(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Sessional papers of the Dominion of Canada 1902"

\ 



/ 



Oa.n 



oc 



SESSIONAL PAPERS 



VOLUME 1-3 



SECOND SESSION OF THE NINTH PARLIAMENT 



OP THE 



DOMINION OF CANADA 



SESSIOl*^ 1902 










^ 



VOLUME XXXVI 



2 Edw. VII. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. 



A. 1902 



i^rSee also Numerical List, page 3. 

ALPHABETICAL INDEX 

OF THE 

SESSIONAL PAPERS 

OF THE 

PARLIAMENT OF CANADA 



SECOND SESSION, NINTH PARLIAMENT, 1902. 



Adulteration of Food 

Agricultural Implements ... 

Agriculture, Annual Report 

Alien Labour Law 

American Bank Note Co 

Archives, Canadian. 

Auditor General, Annual Report 



Banks, Chartered 

Belleville Post Office 

Biology, Canadian 

Bonds and Securities 

British Canadian Loan and Investment Co. 
British Columbia Acts 



« 
.59 
22a 
44 

55 
67 



Canadian Contingents to South Africa «)3, 96 

Canadian Pacific Railway : 

Appeal to Privy Council 80 

Business with Interior Deijartment . . 70a 

Increase of Capital Stock 48 

Lands sold by 70 

Cattle, Canadian 42 

Central Experimental Farm 56 

Chartered Banks 6 

Chinese Immigration 54 

Civil Service : 

Appointments and Promotions 47 

Examiners . 31 

Insurance . 41 

List 30 

Superannuations S8 

Clinton, David 59c 

Coal Mining in British Columbia 89 

Cold Storage on Steamships 101 

Commutations of Sentences 93 

Coronation of the King 64 

Contract?s, Railways and Canals 61 

Criminal Statistics 17 

1 



D 

Devlin, C. R 58 

Disallowance of British Columbia Acts ... 67 

Dividends unpaid in Banks 7 

Dominion Lands 7,5, 75a 

Dominion Police 52 

K 

Estimates 3 to 5c 

Ewing, Treadgold & Barwick 81, 81a 

Exchequer Court 45, 45rt 

Experimental Farms 16 

F 

Farmer's Farm 56 

Farm Land Values 62 

Fisheries, Annual Rei)ort 22 

Fishery Regulations 226 

Fishing Bounties (59 

<; 

Geographic Board 21a 

Geological Survey Report 26 

Glasgow Exhibition g? 

Governor (General's Warrants 37 

H 

Hamilton and Guelph Mail 5% 

Harbour Commissioners 23 

I 

Immigration 68 

Indian Act 32 

Indian Affairs, Annual Report. 27 

Inland Revenue, Annual Report 12 

Insurance, Abstract 9 

Insurance, Annual Report g 

Intercolonial Railway lOO 

Intercolonial Trade 77 

Interior, Annual Report 25 

Interior Department Officials 73 



2 Edw. VII. 



Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. 



A. 1902 



Japanese ImmigTation 
Justice, Annual Report 



Labour, Department of. Annual Report 

Lake Sirocoe 

I^ngelier, Hon. F 

Library of Parliament, Annual Report. 
List of Shipping 



79 
94 
33 

216 



91 



MacKenzie & Mann 98 

Mail, Hamilton and Guelph 596 

Manitoba Public Lands 83, 83<t 



Marconi*8 Wireless Telegraph Co. ... 

Marine, Annual Reixirt 

Marine Biological Station 

Militia and Defence, Annual Report. 
Monument to General Montgomery . , 



51, 



N 

New Brunswick Railways. . 
North-west Irrigation Act 
North-west Mount«Kl Police. 

O 



Ontario Subsidies 

Ottawa Improvement Commission. 
Over-rulings of Treasury Board.. . . 
Oyster-Fishing Licenses 



Pan-American Exhibition 

Pajjer Manufacturers' Combine 

Paris Exhibition 57 

Police, Dominion. , . 

Police, North-west Mounted 

PoHtmaster General, Annual Report 

Predaceous Fish 

Preferential Trade 

Public Accounts, Annual Report 

Public Printing and Stationery ., 

Public Works, Annual Rejjort 



C^iebec Shoe Workers' Union 



Railway Commispions, &c 

Railways and Canals, Annual Report. 
Railways and Canals Contracts 



51a 

21 

22a 

35 

91 



92 
39 
43 

99 



53 
, 57a 

52 

28 

24 

226 
102 
2 

32 

19 . 



90 



20a 

20 

61 



Restigouche Indians 85 

Rossland Miners' Union 90a 

Roy, Adrien 80 

Royal Commission, Chinese and Japanese.. 54 

Royal Commission re Paper Combine 53 



Secretary of State, Annual Report 29 

Seine Licenses in British Columbia 95 

Shareholders in Chartered Banks 6 

Shipping, List of 216 

Simcoe, Lake 79 

Soulanges Canal 71 

South African Constabulary, &c 63, 96 

Steamship Subsidies 97 

St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary 84, 84a 

Sugar Imix)rts 73 



Taylor, Colonel, ReiX)rt of 

Therien, H 

Thomas, Alphonse 

Timber Limits 

Trade and Commerce, Annual Report . 
Trade and Navigation, Annual Report . 

Trade Unions 

Treasury Board Over-rulings 

Trout Hatching . . . 



Unclaimed Balances in Banks. 
Unforeseen Expenses 



89 

md 
me 

88 
10 
11 
50 
43 
226 



Vegetables from United States. . 
Violations of Alien Labour Law 



\\ 



Warrants, Governor (General' 

Weights, Measures &c 

Winnipeg Post Office 

Wireless Telegraph 

Wurtele, Hon. Mr 



m, 66a 
60 



37 
13 
59a 
51, 51a 



Yukon : 

Concessions and Leases 

Ewing, Treadgold & Barwick 
Ordinances passed by Council 
Timber Licenses 



94 



65 

81, 81a 
46 

M/, 



2 Edw. Yll. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1902 



See also Alphabetical Index, page 1. 

LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS 

Arranged in Numerical Order, with their titles at full length; the Dates when 
Ordered and when ^presented to the Houses of Parliament ; the Name of the 
Member who moved for each Sessional Paper, and whether it is ordered to 
be Printed or Not Printed, 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 1. 

(This volume is bound in two parts.) 

1. Report of the Auditor General for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1901. Presented 18th February, 

1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribution and sessional papers, 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2. 

2. Public Accounts of Canada, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1901. Presented 17th February, 1902. 

by Hon. W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribution and sessional jMpcrs. 

3. Estimates of sums required for the services of Canada, for the year ending on the 30ch June, 1903, 

Presented 17th February, 1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional jyapers. 

4. Supplementary Estimates for the year ending 30th June, 1902. Presented 6th March, 1902, by Hon . 

W. S. Fielding ... Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

5. Further Supplementary Estimates for the year ending 30th June, 1902. Presented 30th April, 1902, 

by Hon. W. S. Fielding •...., .Printed for both distribution and sessional paper?. 

5a, Supplementary Estimates for the year ending 30th June, 1903. Presented 7th May, 1902, by Hon. 

W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

5b. Further Supplementary Estimates for the year ending 30th June, 1902. Presented 7th May, 1902, by 

Hon. W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

5c. Further Supplementary Estimates for the year ending 30th June, 1902. Presented 14th May, 1902, 

by Hon. W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

6. List of Shareholders in the Chartered Banks of Canada, as on the 31st December, 1901. Presented 21st 

April, 1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribution and sessional j^apers. 

7.' Report of dividends remaining unpaid, unclaimed balances and unpaid drafts and bills of exchange in 
Chartered Banks of Canada, for five years and iipwards, prior to December, 1901. Presented 9th 
May, 1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding .Printed for both distribution and sessional j)apers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 3. 

8. Report of the Superintendent of Insurance, for the year ended 31st December, 1901. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

9. Abstract of Statements of Insurance Companies in Canada, for the year ended 31st December, 1901. 

Presented 26th March, 1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

^ 3 



2 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1902 



CO^^TENTS OF VOLUME 4. 

10. Report of the Department of Trade and Coinmerce, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1901. Pre- 

sented 18th February, 1902, by Sir Richard Cartwright. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers . 

COIS^TENTS OF VOLUME 5. 

11. Tables of the Trade and Navigation of Canada, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1901. Presented 

18th February, 1902, by Hon. W. Paterson. . . Printed for loth distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 6. 

12. Inland Revenues of Canada. Excise, etc., for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1901. Presented 27tb 

February, 1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

13. Inspection of Weights, Measures, Gas and Electric Light, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1901. 

Presented 27th February, lfK)2, by Hon. W. S. Fielding. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers^ 

1 4. Report on Adulteration of Food, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1901. Presented 17th February, 

1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

15. Report of the Minister of Agriculture, for the year ended 31st October, 1901. Presented 21st Febru- 

ary, 1902, by Hon. S. A. Fisher Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

16. Report of the Directors and Officers of the Experimental Farms, for the year 1901. Presented 8th 

April, 1902, by Hon. S. A. Fisher. . Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 7. 

17. Criminal Statistics for the year 1901 Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

18. Report on Canadian Archives, 1901. Presented 23rd April, 1902, by Hon. S. A. Fisher. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional jxipers. 

19. Report of the Minister of Public Works, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1901. Presented 17th 

February, 1902, by Hon. J. I. Tarte Printed for both distribution and sessio'nal papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 8. 

20. Annual Reix)rt of the Department of Railways and Canals, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1901 . 

Presented 19th February, 1902, by Hon. A. G. 'BAa^T. Printed for both distribution and sessional papers^ 
20a. Reports upon Railway Commissions, Railway Rate Grievances, and Regulative Legislation. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers^ 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9. 

21. ReiX)rt of the Department of Marine and Fisheries (Marine), for the fiscal year ended 30th Juno, 

1901. Presented 19th February, 1902, by Hon. J. Sutherland. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 
21a. Third Annual Report of the Geographic Board of Canada. 1901. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 
21b, List of Shipping issued by the Department of Marine and Fisheries, being a List of Vessels on the 
registry books of Canada, on the Slst December, 1901. 

Printed for both distribution and sessioiud papers. 

22. Reix)rt of the Department oi Marine and Fisheries (Fisheries), for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 

1901. Presented 26th February, 1902, by Hon. J. Sutherland. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional petper.--. 
22a. Contributions to Canadian Biology, being studies from the Marine Biological Station of Canada, 1901. 

Printed for both di.'^tribution and sessional, papers. 



2 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1902 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME ^^Continued, 

226. Special Reports on the Hatching and Planting of Trout ; the Propagation and Planting of Pi-edaceous 
Fish, and the Aim and Basis of Fishery Regulations. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 
23. Report of the Harbour Commissioners, etc., 1901 Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 10. 

544. Report of the Postmaster General, for the year ended 30th June, 1901. Presented 17th February, 
1902, by Hon. W. Mulock Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

25. Annual Report of the Department of the Interior, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1901. Presented 

20th February, 1902, by Hon. C. Sifton Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 11. 

26. Summary Report of the Geological Survey Department for the calendar year 1901. Presented 14th 

April, 1902, by Hon. C. Sifton Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

27. Annual Report of the Department of Indian Affairs, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1901. 

Presented 20th February, 1902, by Hon. C. Sifton . Printed! for both distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 12. 

28. Report of the North-west Mounted Police, 1901. Presented 12th March, 1902, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

29. Report of the Secretary of State of Canada, for the year ended 31st December, 1901. Presented 27th 

February, 1902, by Hon. C. Fitzpatrick Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

30. Civil Service List of Canada, 1901. Presented 19th February, 1902, by Hon. C. Fitzpatrick. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

31. Report of the Board of Civil Service Examiners, for the year ended 31st December, 1901. Presented 

20th March, 1902, by Hon. H. G. Carroll Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

32. Annual Report of the Department of Public Printing and Stationery, for the year ended 30th June, 

1901. Presented 27th February, 1902, by Hon. C. Fitzpatrick. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

33. Report of the Joint Librarians of Parliament for the year 1901. Presented 13th February, 1902, by 

the Hon. The Speaker Printed for sessional papers. 

34. Report of the Minister of Justice as to Penitentiaries of Canada, for the year ended 30th June, 1901. 

Presented 17th February, 1902, by Hon. C. Fitzpatrick. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers . 

35. Report of the Department of Militia and Defence of Canada, for the year ended 3l8t December, 1901. 

Presented 17th March, 1902, by Hon. F. VV. Borden. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 13. 

36. Report of the Department of Labour, for the year ended 30th June, 1901. Presented 17th February, 

1902, by Hon. W. Mulock Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

37. Statement of Governor General's Warrants issued since the last session of parliament, on account of 

the fiscal year 1901-02. Presented 17th February, 1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding Not printed. 

38. Statement of all superannuations and retiring allowances in the civil service during the year ended 

31st December, 1901, showing name, rank, salary, service, allowance and cause of retirement of each 
person superannuated or retired, also whether vacancy filled by promotion or by new appointment, 
and salary of any new appointee. Presented 17th February, 1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding. 

Not printed. 
5 



2 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1902 



COITTENTS OF VOLUME IZ-^ Continued. 

39. Statement of receipts and expendituffes of the Ottawa Improvement Commission, for the fiscal year 

ended 30th June, 1901. Presented 17th February, 1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding Not printed. 

40. Return showing the expenditure on account of unforeseen expenses from the 1st July, 1901, to the 

13th February, 1902. Presented 17th February, 1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding Not printed. 

41. Statement in pursuance of section 17, of the Civil Service Insurance Act, for the fiscal year ended 

30th June, 1901. Presented 17th February, 1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding. Not printed, 

42. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 19th February, 1902, for copy of all papers and 

correspondence exchanged between Canadian and British authorities, with reference to the 
embargo imposed by the British government on Canadian cattle. Presented 6th March, 1902.— Mr. 
Boiirassa Not printed. 

43. Return of over-rulings by the treasury boai'd of the auditor general's decisions between the commence- 

ment of the session of 1901 and the session of 1902. Presented 18th February, 1902, by Hon. W. S. 
Fielding Not printed 

44. Detailed statement of all bonds and securities registered in the department of the secretary of state of 

Canada, since last return, 11th February, 1901, submitted to the parliament of Canada imder section 
23, chapter 19 of the Revised Statutes of Canada, Presented 19th February, 1902, by Hon. C. Fitz- 
patrick Not printed. 

45. Orders of the Exchequer Court. Presented 19th February, 1902, by Hon. C. Fitzpabtrick . Not ]jrinted . 
45a. Rules of the Exchequer Court, pursuant to 52 Victoria, chapter 38, section 2. Presented 19th March, 

1902, by Hon. H. G. Carroll Not printed. 

46. Ordinances passed by the Yukon council during the year 1901. Presented 19th February, 1902, by 

Hon. C. Fitzpatrick - Not printed. 

47. Return of the names and salaries of all persons appointed to or promoted in the Civil Service of 

Canada during the year 1901. Presented 19th February, 1902, by Hon. C. Fitzpatrick.. iSToi printed. 

48. Copy of a report of the committee of the honourable the privy council, approved by his excellency on 

the 23rd January, 1902, relative to a proposed increase of the capital stock of the Canadian Pacific 
Railway Company, by twenty millions of dollars and correspondence relating thereto. Presented 
19th February, 1902, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier Priiitcd for sessional papers. 

49. Copy of a rejjort of the committee of the honourable the privy council, approved by his excellency on 

the 31st May, 1901, relating to a contract with the American Bank Note Company and correspon - 
dence relating thereto. Presented 20th February, 1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding. 

Printed for sessional papers. 

60. Annual return under chajjter 131 (R.S.C), intituled : " An Act respecting Trade Unions." Presented 

21st February, 1902, by Hon. C. Fitzpatrick. Not printed. 

51. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 26th February, 1902, for a copy of the correspon- 

dence relating to an agreement made between the government of Canada and the Marconi's Wireless 
Telegraph Company, Limited. Presented 26th February, 1902, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier. 

Not printed. 
ola. Memorandum of agreement made the seventeenth day of March, 1902, between Marconi's Wireless 
Telegraph Company, Limited, and the Marconi International Marine Communication Company, 
Limited, and His Majesty King Edward Seventh, represented herein by the Right Honourable Sir 
Wilfrid Laurier, G.C.M.G., President of the King's Privy Council for Canada. Presented 15th 
April, 1902, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier Printed for sessional papers. 

52. Report of the Commissioner, Dominion Police Force, for the year 1901. Presented 26th February, 

1902, by Hon. C. Fitzpatrick JVb< printed. 

53. Report of Commissioner and other documents in connection with the Royal Commission in re the 

alleged combination of paper inauufacturers and dealers. Presented 21st April, 1902, by Hon. W. 
S. Fielding . . , Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

54. Report of the Royal Commission on Chinese and Japanese Immigration. Part I. —Chinese Immi- 

gration. Presented 27th February, 1902, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier. Part II.— Japanese Immigration, 
together with all the evidence taken before the said Conmiission, Presented 14th April, liK)2, by 

Sir Wilfrid Laurier Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

6 



2 Edw. VIL List of Sessional Papers. A. 1902 



COKTEC^TS OF VOLUME IS— Continued. 

55. Statement of the affairs of the British Canadian Loan and Investment Company, as on the 3Xst 

December, 1901. Presented 3rd March, 1902, by the Hon. The Speaker Not printed. 

56. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 19th February, 1902, showing the names and 

number of men employed on the 200 acres set apart at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, as a 
farm proper to be handled as a farm, that is, as any farmer's farm might be handled ; mentioned in 
the evidence of J. H. Grisdale, Esq., given Thursday, April 11th, 1901, at the morning session of 
the select standing committee on agriculture and colonization. The number of employees and the 
wages paid to each employee. The total crop of various kinds grown on said 200 acres, and the 
amount said total crop was sold for. Presented 4th March, 1902. — Mr. Wilson Not printed. 

57. Supplementary return to an order of the Hovise of Commons, dated 18th February, 1901, for copies of 

all correspondence, telegrams, letters, notes and memoranda exchanged between the Canadian com- 
missioner at the Paris exhibition, or any member of the Canadian commission, and Lord Strathcona. 
or the royal commission or the colonial secretary, in relation to the representation of Canada at the 

exhibition. Presented 4th March, 1902. — Mr. Bourassa. Not printed. 

57a. Report of the Canadian Commission at the Paris exhibition. Presented 22nd April, 1902, by Hon. 
S. A. Fisher Not printed. 

58. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 19th February, 1902, for correspondence between 

the department of the interior or the minister of the interior, and Mr. C. R. Devlin, with reference 
to a letter that appeared in United Canada on 11th May, 1901, and a letter that appeared in the 
Montreal Herald on the 18th May, 1901 ; in both of said letters Mr. C. R. Devlin made certain 
statements regarding members of this house. Presented 6th March, 1902. — Mr. Wilson. 

Not printed. 

59. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 19th February, 1902, showing : 1. The names of 

all employees in the post office at Belleville, Ontario, on June 30th, 1896, together with the age of 
each, date of entry in the service, and the salary of each on the said date. 2. The number of 
employees dismissed from the Belleville post office since June 30th, 1896, with cause and 
date of dismissal. 3. The number of employees superannuated, the date of their superannuation, 
reason for their superannuation, how much superannuation allowance has been allowed to each ; 
giving the names of all said employees so superannuated who have asked to be superannuated. 4. 
How many employees were employed in the Belleville post office on 1st January, 1902 ; what were 
their names and the age and salary of each employee on said date, and date of appointment. Pre- 
sented 7th March, 1902.— Mr. Wilson Not printed. 

59«. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 10th March, 1902, for a list of the names of all 
permanent and temporary officials employed in the Winnipeg post office since the 1st of July, 1896 ; 
date of appointment, length of service, and salary up to the 1st of January, 1902. Presented 3rd 
April, 1902.— Mr. LaRiviere Not printed. 

596. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 28th April, 1902, of copies of all tenders re- 
ceived by the post office department in June, 1901, for carrying mail between Hamilton and 
Guelph. Presented 7th May, 1902.— Afr. Smith (Wentworth) Not printed. 

59c. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th April, 1902, for copies of all petitions, 
correspondence and any and all other documents addressed by any person or persons to the honour- 
able the postmaster general upon which he or the department acted in dismissing, or which led to 
the dismissal of David Clinton, lately postmaster at Wellington, Ontario. Presented 9th May, 
1902.— i¥r. Alcorn Not printed. 

o9d. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 28th April, 1902, for a copy of the petition sent 
to the government asking for the dismissal of Mr. H. Therien, postmaster at Grandes Piles, in the 
province of Quebec ; and copies of all correspondence between the government and all persons- in- 
terested in the subject of such dismissal. Presented 14th May, 1902.— ilfr. ^a/^ Not printed. 

59c. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th April, 1902, for copies of all correspondence, 
petitions, affidavits and documents relating to the dismissal of Alphonse Thomas as postmaster 
at La Prairie, P.Q. Presented 14th May, 1902.— Mr. Monk Ifot printed . 

60. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 27th February, 1902, for copies of all letters, tele- 

grams and other correspondence between the department of labour and the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way, Mr. John Wilson and other parties, in respect of alleged violations of the Alien Labour Law, 
between June 1st and September 1st, 1901. Also between officers of the immigration department 
and the Canadian Pacific Railway. Presented 7th March, 1902. — 3£r. Puttee Not printed. 

7 



2 Edw. YII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1902 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME IZ-^ Continued, 

61. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 3rd March, 1902, showing:—!. All contracts 

awarded by the department of railways and canals during the year ending June 30th, 1901, in which 
the "Current Wages" clause was mcorporated, and the amount of such contracts. 2. The number 
of such contracts in which the schedule of wages was prepared by the fair wages officers. 
3. The number of such contracts in which the schedule of wages was prepared by the contractors and 
accepted by the department. 4. The number of such contracts whicli were unaccompanied by 
schedule of wages. 5. The number of contracts awarded by the department of railways and canals 
which did not contain either the " Current Wages " clause or a schedule of wages. Presented 11th 
March, 1902.— Mr. Puttee Not printed. 

62. Report on the trend of farm land values as indicated by the selling price. Presented 11th March, 

1902, by Hon. S. A. Fisher Notprmted. 

63. Return to an older of the House of Commons, dated 27th February, 1902, showing : 1. Whether the 

government or any member thereof, by letter or otherwise, gave any public or private assurance 
that in the selection of officers for the Canadian South African constabulary, which left for South 
Africa, last year, preference would be given to those Canadian officers who have served in South 
Africa and to other officers of the Canadian militia. 2. What persons, officers or others, api>lied for 
commissions in said constabulary. What is the military record of each, either in Canada, South 
Africa or elsewhere 3. (a). What officers were selected and appointed ; [h). What is the military 
record of each. 4. Who of those selected as officers had never before been officers. 5. Whether 
there were enough applications from officers of the Canadian militia to officer the constabulary, and 
the reason for theii being passed over, and men without qualification, if there were any such, 
selected. 6. How n any commissioned officers of the Canadian militia were enlisted in the first and 
second contingents, ia the Royal Canadian Regiment, the Canadian Mounted Infantry, the Royal 
Canadian Dragoons, and the Canadian Artillery, as (a.) non-commissioned officers and (6.) as men. 
7. How nianj' non-co.nmissioned officers and men of the permanent corps were enlisted in the corps 
named in question. How many of these were non-commissioned officers in South Africa, (c.) Why 
were the commissioned officers enlisted in the corjjs as privates, not given the non-commissions. 
Pre.sented 11th March, 1902.— ilfr. Monk Not printed. 

64. Return to an address of be House of Commons, dated 19th February, 1902, for a copy of all papers 

and correspondence relating to the coronation of his majesty the king ; the imperial conference 
which is to be held in London, and the appointment of Canadian delegates to the same. Presented 
11th March, 1902. — Mr. Bourassa Printed for sessional papers. 

65. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 19th February, 1902, for : 1. Copies of all 

applications for any portion of the ground covered by the Matson concession (so-called), or lease No. 
9, in the Yukon district. 2. Copies of all applications for any portion of the ground covered by the 
Doyle concession (so-called), in the Yukon district. 3. Copies of all applications for any portion of 
the ground covered by the Bronson & Ray concession, in the Yukon district. 4. A memorandum 
showing the date on which the application in the Brcnson & Ray concession was granted. 5. Copy 
of the application for all lay-overs in all these cases. 6. Copies of orders in council or other authority 
under which the minister of the interior granted any lay-over in these cases ; and copy of the 
material, reiwrts or other evidence upon which such lay-overs were granted. 7. A description of 
the Boyle concession and a map of same. 8. Copy of the application for Boyle concession. 9 The 
exact terms of the application in the case of the Milne concession. 10. The dates on which this 
application was made and granted. IJ. Map showing ground covered. 12. The date when the 
application for the Slavin & Gates concession was made and filed. 13. Copy of Green's original 
map, with copy of field notes attached in the case of the Slavin & Gates concession. 14. Copy of 
telegram from the deputy minister of interior to E. C. Senkler as to the boundaries of this concession, 
• dated on or about the 5th June, 1901. Presented 12th March, 1902.— ilifr. Taylor Not printed. 

66. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 20th February, 1902, for a statement in detail 

showing the quantity of vegetables imi)orted from the United States and entered at the ])orts of 
Montreal and Toronto during the years 1900 and 1901, respectively, as well as of the amount of 
duties collected by the government of Canada during the said two years at each one' of the said i)orts. 

Presented 14th March, 1902.— Mr. Leonard Not printed. 

66a. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 20th February, 1902, for coi>ies of all petitions, 
resolutions, letters, etc., addressed to the government in relation to an increase or a readjustment of 
the duties on vegetables, and of all replies sent by the government to said resolutions, petitions and 

letters. Presented 24th March, 1902. —Mr. Leonard Not printed. 

8 



2 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1902 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME U— Continued, 

67. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 19th Februaiy, 1902, for a copy of all papers 

and correspondence relating to the disallowance of chapters 11 and 14 of the Statutes of 1900, pro- 
vince of British Columbia, viz. : "An Act to regulate immigration into British Columbia,"' and 
"An Act relating to the employment on works carried on under franchises granted by Private 
Acts." Presented 17th March, 1902.— il/r. Bourassa Not printed. 

68. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 19th Febriiary, 1902, showing : 1. The amount 

of money spent each year from June 30th, 1891, to June 30th, 1901, on immigration. 2. The number 
of immigrants reported each year to have settled each year in the Dominion of Canada during the 
ten (10) years from 1891 to 1901. and the total for the ten years. 3. The number of immigrant 
agents employed by the Dominion government each year in Great Britain and Ireland from 1891 to 

1901, and the total amount paid each year to the said agents, and the amount spent each year for 
printing and other ex})enses by the said agents. 4. The number of immigrant agents employed by 
the Dominion government each year in the continent of Europe from 1891 to IfcOl, and the total 
amount paid each year to the said agents, and the amount spent each year for printing and other 
expenses by the said agents. 5. The number of immigrant agents employed by the Dominion gov- 
ernment each year in the United States of America from 1891 co 1901 ; and the total amount paid 
each year to the said agents ; and amounts spent each year for printing and tether expenses by the 
said agents; and by the government of the Dominion of Canada. Presented 18th March, 1902. — 
Mr. Wilson Printed for sessional papers. 

69. Statement for parliament relative to fishing bounty payments for the year 1900-1901, required under 

section 4, of chapter 96, of the Revised Statutes of Canada, intituled : " An Act to encourage the 
development of the sea fisheries and the building of fishing vessels." Presented (Senate) 19th March, 

1902, by Hon. R. W. Scott Not printed. 

70. Return of all lands sold by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, from the 1st October, 1900, to 

the 1st October, 1901. Presented 2l8t March, 1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding Not printed. 

70o. Return (in so far as the department of the interior is concerned) of copies of all orders in council, 
plans, papei's and correspondence which are required to be presented to the House of Commons, under 
a resolution passed on 20th February, 1882, since the date of the last return under such resolution. 
Presented 21st Marcli, 1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding Not printed. 

71. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 3rd March, 1902, for copies for all applica- 

tions for water powers and other similar rights on or connected with the Soulanges canal, and all 
correspondence with respect thereto, and all reports, letters and communications of or from engineers 
or other experts respecting the same. Also all leases granted to any person, firm or corporation of 
water powers or other similar rights on or connected with the above named canal. Presented 20th 
March, 1902— Mr. Bennett Not printed. 

72. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 26th February, 1902, showing amount of the 

rebate paid on agricultural implements exported from Canada for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 
1901, specifying amount paid to each firm. Presented 20th March, 1902 — Mr. Henderson. Not printed. 

73. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 6th March, 1902, showing : 1. The amount of 

refined sugar imported into Canada (a) from the first of January to 31st December, 1900 ; (b) from 
the first of January to the 31st of December, 1901 ; 2. The amount of raw sugar imported within 
same dates, each year separate, and the name of the country from which it has been imported. Pre- 
sented 20th March. 1902— 3/r. Madore Not printed, 

74. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated ioth March, 1902, for a tracing showing the 

principal railway lines in operation in New Brunswick, and showing the railway lines, or ix>rtions 
of such lines, over which postal cars are run. Presented 24th March, 1902— /l/r. Costiyan . 

Not printed. 

75. Return of orders in council, which have been published in the Canada Gazette and in the British 

Columbia Gazette, between 1st January and 31st December, 1901, in accordance with the provisions 
of subsection (d)' oi section 38 of the regulations for the survey, administration, disposal and manage- 
ment of Dominion lands within the 40-mile railway belt in the province of British Columbia. Pre- 
sented 21st March, 1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding Not printed. 

9 



2 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1902 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME IS— Continued, 

75a. Return of orders in council which have been published in the Canada Gazette between 1st January 
and 31st December, 1901, in accordance with the provisions of clause 91 of the Dominion Lands Act, 
chapter 54 of the Revised Statutes of Canada and its amendments. Presented 21st March, 1902, by 
Hon. W. S. Fielding Not printed. 

76. Return of orders in council which have been published in the Canada Gazette between 1st January 

and 31st December, 1901, in accordance with the provisions of section 52 of the North-west Irrigation 
Act, chapter 35 of 61 Victoria, Presented 21st March, 1902, by Hon. W. S. Fielding. — Not printed. 

77. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 19th February, 1902, for copies of all letters, 

telegrams and other correspondence between the governments of Canada, Australia and New Zealand 
or any member thereof, respecting trade transportation, cable and other subjects of intercolonial 
concern. Presented 26th March, 1902 — Mr. Campbell Printed for sessional papers. 

78. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 10th March, 1902, for list of the names of all 

permanent and temporary officials of the several branches of the department of the interior, date of 
appointment, and their salaries, on the 1st July, 1896 ; also a similar list on the 1st July, 1901 . 
Presented 26th March, 1902. — Mr. LaRiviere Not printed. 

79. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 21st February, 1901, of all papers, reports and 

other data relative to the lowering of the waters of Lake Simcoe, with a view towards reclaiming 
certain flooded lands. Presented 26th March, 1902.— ilfr. McLeod Not printed. 

80. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 27th February, 1902, for a copy of the report 

from the judicial committee of the privy council, dated the 8th day of December, 1901, in the matter 
of an appeal from the court of king's bench for the province of Quebec (appeal side) between the 
Canadian Pacific Railway Corajjany, appellant, and Adrien Roy, respondent. Presented 7th April, 
1902.— Mr. Lemieux . .- Not printed. 

81. Orders in council with respect to the application made by Messrs. Ewing, Ti'eadgold and Barwick, to 

divert water for mining purposes. Presented 8th April, 1902, by Hon. C. Sifton. 

Printed for loth distribution and sessional papers . 

81a. Partial return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 9th April, 1902 : 1. For copies of all 
orders in council, petitions, applications, reports, telegrams, correspondence, grants, contracts, 
agreements, documents, and communications in writing, relating to or concerning the grant to or 
concession to A. N. C. Treadgold and others, or to the Hydraulic Minmg Syndicate, either 
separately or associated with A, N. C. Treadgold, of any claims, rights, and privileges on Bonanza, 
Bear and Hunker Creeks or their tributaries, or elsewhere in the Yukon territory. 2. A description 
and plan showing the situation, location, area, and other particulars of all the claims, rights, and 
privileges so granted or conceded to the said A. N. C. Treadgold and others, or to the said Hydraulic 
Mining Syndicate, as aforesaid. Presented 23rd April, 1902.— iJfr. Borden (Halifax). 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

816. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th April, 1902, indicating : 1. The names of 
all gi-antee.s of permits to cut timber in the Yukon, to whom permits, licenses or leases have been 
issued since the 1st January, 1899. 2, The location of such grants. 3. The annual amount payable 
by the grantee, licensee or lessee. 4. The price or consideration of the grant. 5. The name in each 
case of the present holder of grant or lease, if transferred. 6. Whether each and every grant was 
puV)licly advertised for sale by auction. Presented 29th April, 1902.— Mr. Monk Not printed. 

82. Return showing the reductions and remissions under section 141 as added to the Indian Act by section 

8, chapter 35, 58-59 Victoria, during the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1901. Presented (Senate) 8th 
April, 1902, by Hon. R. W. Scott. Not printed. 

83. Return to an address of the Senate, dated 20th February, 1902, for copies of all orders in council, 

documents, memoranda, or other papers, relating to the transfer, from the federal to the provin- 
cial control, of public lands alloted for education in Manitoba, or relating to the payment by this 
government to the Manitoba government of any money— whether it be on the capital or on the 
interest— derived from the sales of such lands ; also copies of all corresijondence between the govern- 
ment or any memljer thereof, and the government of Manitoba or any member thereof, or any other 
persons, up to this date, in connection with the above matters. Presented (Senate) 9th April, 1902. 

— Hon. Mr. Bernirr Printed for both distribntion and sessional papers. 

10 



2 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1902 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME IS— Continued. 

83a. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 19th February, 1902, for a copy of all corres- 
pondence, petitions, orders in council, and any and all documents in connection with the demands 
of the provincial legislature, with regard to the school lands in Manitoba ; moneys derived from 
sales thereof, together with interest accrued thereon. Presented 25th April, 1902. — Mr. LaRiviere. 

Incorporated with 83. 

84. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 9th April, 1902, for copies of all correspon- 

dence, papers, letters, telegrams, etc., between the department of justice and the authorities of the 
St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, relating to the leave granted to the present warden, as well as 
that which passed respecting the superannuation of the said warden. Presented 21st April, 1902. — 
Mr. Leonard Not printed . 

84a. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th April, 1902, for copies of all correspondence, 
letters, claims, etc., addressed to the government in regard to the indemnity of Treffle Nantel, a 
guard at the St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, who died on or about the 12th September, 1900; as 
well as all documents relating to that matter. Presented 21st April, 1902. — Mr. Leonard. 

Not printed. 

85. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th April, 1902, for a copy of the report of 

Inspector McRae of the Indian department relating to the investigation held by him respecting the 
complaint by the Restigouche Indians against Indian Agent Peters, together with all corresix)ndence 
and documents in connection therewith. Prcsf^nted 21st April, 1902.^ilfr. Foioler Not printed. 

86. Reix)rt of the Commissioner for Canada at the Pan-American exhibition. Presented 22nd April, 

1902, by Hon. S. A. Fisher . Not printed. 

87. Report of the Canadian Commissioner at the Glasgow exhibition. Presented 22nd April, 1902, by 

Hon. S. A. Fisher . Not printed. 

88. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 13th March, 1902, showing :— 1. The number of 

timber limits, and where located, that have been disposed of by the government since July, 1890, in 
the province of Manitoba and North-west Territories. 2. The names of the purchasers in each case, 
and price paid for each limit. 3. Copies of tenders for each limit, and names of newspapers in 
which advertisements appeared. Presented 23rd April, 1902. — Mr. Roche (Marquette). 

Not printed. 

89. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th April, 1902, for any communications, reports, 

or other documents received by the government, or any member or department thereof, from Colonel 
Taylor, of Pittsburg, U.S.A., with reference to the deposits of coal and coal mining in South 
British Columbia, particularly the Crow's Nest Pass coal fields. Presented 25th April, 1902.— il/r. 
Bennett Not printed. 

90. Return to an order of the House of Conunons, dated 9th April, 1902, for copy of petition dated on or 

about November 29th, 1901, from the president of the Quebec Trades and Labour Council to the 
department of labour, and of all documents connected with said petition or mentioned therein, or 
correspondence ensuing therefrom in reference to the arbitration controversy or conflict between the 
Shoe Workers' Union of Quebec city and Mgr. L. N. Begin, Archbishop of Quebec. Presented 28th 

April, 1902.— iWr. Pwftec Not Printed. 

90a. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th April, 1902, for copies of all letters, 
telegrams and other correspondence between the department of labour and the officers of the 
Rossland Miners' Union and other persons, -in reference to the alleged violations of the Alien Labour 
Act in connection with the Rossland miners' strike. Presented 9th May, 1902.— il/r. Smith 
(Vancouver) Not printed. 

91. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 14th April, 1902, for copies of all memorials, 

petitions or protests received respecting the erection of a monument to General Montgomery at 
Quebec, with dates ; also copies of replies sent thereto. Presented 29th April, 1902.— ilfr. Clarke. 

Not printed. 

92. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 9th April, 1902, for a statement of all moneys 

paid by the Dominion government to the province of Ontario during the calendar years 1900 and 
1901, respectively ; stating in each case how nmch of such moneys so paid was on account of subsidy, 
allowance for government, and interest, respectively. Also copies of all telegrams, letters, or cor- 
respondence of any kind in any way relating to or connected with the transmission of such moneys. 

Presented 30th April, 1902.— J/r. Henderson Not printed. 

11 



2 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1902 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME IS— Continued. 

93. Returntoanorderof the House of Commons, dated 26th February, 1902, showing (1st) the number 

of commutations of sentences that have been granted through the department of justice to prisoners 
convicted of arson or incendiarism during the years 1899, 1900 and 1901, respectively ; (2nd) the 
places where the crimes were committed ; (3rd) the sentences imposed. Presented 1st May, 1902.— 
Mr. ATonk ^ot lirinted. 

94. Retvarn to an address of the Senate, dated 9th Ajjril, 1902, for a copy of the orders in council appoint- 

ing : 1. The Honourable Mr. Wurtele, one of the judges of the court of appeal for the province of 
Quebec, chairman of the commission for the revision of the statutes of the Dominion of Canada. 2. 
The Honourable Justice Francois Langelier, one of the judges of the superior court of the province 
of Quebec, a judge of the court of appeal of the same province, in the room and place of the said 
Honourable Judge Wurtele. 3. Cancelling the aforesaid appointments ; together with a copy of all 
correspondence exchanged on the subject of these appointments and the cancellation thereof. Pre- 
sented (Senate) 2nd May, 1902.— JJon. Mr. Landry Not printed. 

95. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th April, 1902, showing : 1. The number of 

seine licenses issued f>or the province of British Columbia for the year 1901. 2. To whom the said 
licenses were issued. 3. The number operated by those to whom they were issued, and by whom. 
4. By whom those were operated which were not used by the parties to whom they were issued. 
Presented :»tli May. 1902.— il/r. Earle Not printed. 

96. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 19th February, 1902, for a copy of all papers 

and correspondence exchanged between his excellency the governor general, the Canadian govern- 
ment, or any of its members or departments, the officer commanding the Canadian militia, and the 
British authorities, in relation to the South African war, its conduct and its settlement ; and the 
sending or recruiting of Canadian troops to South Africa, — for the three last yeai's. Presented 7th 
May, 1902. — .!//•. Bourassa Not printed . 

97. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 3rd March, 1902, for copies of all contracts made 

during two years past between the government of Canada and all steamship companies with whom 
it is agreed that a subsidy, bonus ur grant of any kind shall be given by the government of Canada 
for services to be rendered in connection with transatlantic, transpacific or West Indian business. 
Presented 9tli May, 1902.--Mr. Smith ( Wcnttvorth) , Not j)rintcd. 

98. Copy of the finding of the judge of the exchequer court of Canada, in the matter between William 

Mackenzie and Donald D. Mann, claimants, and His Majesty the King, defendant. Presented 9th 
May, 1902, by Hon. C. Fitzpatrick Not printed. 

99. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th April, 1902, showing what licenses, during 

the year 1900, were issued, entitling the persons named therein to fish for oysters on the beds 
planted by the government in the harbour of Shediac. And also showing to whom such licenses 
were issued, and on what dates tliej'^ were respectively issued, and by whose authority thej'^ were 
issued in each instance, and whether such licenses, or any, and which of them were cancelled ; and if 
so, how many, and on what date, and for what reason, such licenses were cancelled ; and what 
quantity of oysters was secured under such licenses during the period they were in force. Presented 
• 9th May, 1902.— Jifr. Borden (Halifax) Not printed. 

100. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th Aiml, 1902, for a statement showing: 1. 
Into how many cla-sses the employees of the Intercolonial Railway are divided. 2. The name, 
residence and the salary of each of the employees of the first class. 3. The name, residence and 
salary of each of those of the second class. 4. The number of those of the third cla>>, and the total 
amount of the yearly salary paid them. Presented 10th May, 1902. — Mr. L(ou<n-<l Not printed. 

101. Return to an addres- oi rlji Si nut . dated 23rd Ajml, 1902, of all correspondence which has taken 
place within the last two years between the government of Canada or any department or officer 
thereof, and any steamship company or agent of such company, engaged in the transportation of the 
i)roduce of Canada from any port in Canada to Europe, regarding the ventilation of space on steam- 
ships used for storage during transixirtation of perishable products such as apples and cheese ; also 
copies of all clauses in contracts with steamshii) companies relating to the ventilation of the holds or 
spaces between the decks of steamers employed as aforesaid ; also a statement giving the names of 
all steamships and the owner.s thereof which have been equip|)ed with means of generating cold air 
and distriVjuting the san.e throughout their holds and between decks, in terms of the appropriation 
made for such jiurpose during last session of parliament, giving the cost to the government in the 

12 



2 Edw. Vir. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1902 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME Id^ Con eluded. 

case of each steamer ; also a statement showing the daily minimum and maximum temperatures 
maintained during each voyage in the holds or between the decks of steamers equipped in terms of 
the said parliamentary appropriation of last session ; also a statement showing the comparatiA e 
results in the transportation of apples between steamers equipped as above described and steamers 
without any special means of ventilatic^n ; and also a statement giving the names and owners of 
steamers which it is proposed to equip as aforesaid, for the approaching season, and giving the port 
of departure from. Canada of such steamers as well as of those already equipped as aforesaid. Pre- 
sented (Senate) 13th May, 1902.— Hon. Mr. Ferguson liot printed. 

102. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 15th May, 1902, for copies of all papers relating 
to preferential trade. Presented loth May, 1902.— Mr. Bdcourt Not printed. 



13 



1-2 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



A. 1902 



REPORT 



OF THE 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 



1901 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

PRINTED BY S. E. DAWSON, PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST 

EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1902 

No. 28—1902] 



1-2 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 A. 1902 



To His Excellency the Right Honourable the Earl of Minto, <i:G., d'c, Governor 

General of Canada, (tc, (tc. 

May it please Your Excellency : — 

The undersigned has the honour to present to Your Excellency the Annual Report 
of the North-west Mounted Police for the year 1901. 

Respectfully submitted 



WILFRID LAURIER, 

President of the Council 



February 15, 1902. 



1-2 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 A. 1902 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
PART I 

NORTH-AVEST TERRITORIES 

Pack 

Commissioner's RejiorY 1 

APPENDICES TO ABOVK. 

Appendix A. — Sui)eriuteudent A. H. Criesbach, Battleford 10 

B.— Superintendent G. B. Moffatt, Maple Creek 24 

C. -Superintendent J. Howe, Macleod 33 

J). Sui)erintendent C. Constantine, Fort Saskatchewan, witli lieport or liis[nHtor ( '. 44 

H. West, Commanding Peace River District • 58 

E. Superintendent ii. E. .Sanders, Calgary 63 

F. Superintendent W, S. Morris, I)e|H)t Divisi'on, Regina 77 

G. Inspector A. R. Cuthbert, Frince Albert. . 81 
H. -Inspector .1. O. Wilson, Regina District . SS 

J. — Insi»ector H. S. Casey, Lethbridge . !>.') 

K.— Assistant Surgeon C. S. Haultain 10.') 

L. Assistant Surgeon (i. Pearson Bell . ](MJ 

M.— Acting Assistant Surgeon F. H. Mewbinn . 108 

X. -Acting Assistant Surgeon P. Aylen 109 

O. Acting Assistant Surgeon E.-C. Kitchen 111 

P. Acting Assistant Surgeon E. H. Rouleau . . 113 

Q.— Acting Assistant Surgeon A. Blouin llf) 

R. Acting Assistant Surgeon R. B. Deane 117 

S. - Veterinary Surgeon J. Burnett 110 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT GRIESBAGH 17 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

ASSISTANCE TO INDIAN DEPARTMENT. 

An escort was detailed and placed at the service of the Indian agent at Onion Lake 
during the treaty payments there. The Battleford agent did not ask for an escort. A 
constable was also applied for by the Scrip Commissioner, and attended the court during 
the scrip payments. 

DISCIPLINE AND CONDUCT. 

The conduct and discipline of the division has been fair. 

DRILLS AND TARGET PRACTICE. 

In August last, both mounted and dismounted drills were carried on daily, and 
continued up to September 17, on which date the ' C ' Division contingent of the Royal 
Escort left for Regina. 

Owing to the weakness of the division, and the large amount of work to be done 
in the way of repairs and so forth to the barracks, it has not been possible up to date 
to do any target practice. 

LECTURES. 

The usual lectures were held during the winter months, but were discontinued in 
March when the small-pox quarantiiie was established. 

PHYSIQUE. 

The physique of the men of the division is up to the standard. 

CLOTHING AND KIT. 

The clothing and kit supplied are of good quality. 

CHANGES. 

Two staff sergeants and four constables were re-engaged during the year. Within 
the same period, one officer, two staff sergeants, two sergeants and seven constables were 
transferred to this division from other posts. On the other hand, one sergeant was 
transferred to the Yukon, and one corporal and eight constables to the depot. In 
addition, one constable was discharged at the expiration of. his term of service, one 
bought his discharge, and four others were permitted to leave the force, 
to join the South Africa Constabulary, and one died. 

HEALTH. 

The health of the division has been good, there having been no contagious diseases. 

DEATHS. 

I am sorry to have to record one death in the division, viz.: — that of Reg. No. 1353 
Constable Timothy Lucey, who died at Onion Lake on May 1 7 last, from some disorder 
of the kidneys, after an illness which lasted barely a fortnight. 

28—2 



Ig NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

DESERTIONS. 

There were no desertions from the division during the year. 

HORSES. 

When I arrived and took over the command of the division last May, I found the 
horses here few in number and generally used up. This was accounted for by the fact 
that the work done by them, owing to the exigencies of the small-pox quarantine, was 
beyond their strength. I am glad to say, however, that matters have much improved. 

During the year one remount was purchased and twenty-two horses were received 
from the depot. Eight were cast and sold out of the service, and seven more that are 
Also cast will be sold. 

ARMS AND AMMUNITION. 

The arms in use in this division are in the same condition as those in the force 
■generally, i.e., pretty well worn out, and they should be replaced at an early date by 
other weapons of a better and improved type. 

The ammunition is complete and in good condition. 

ARTILLERY. 

I have in my charge one 9-pounder muzzle-loading gun, and two 7-pounder brass 
guns. 

The 9-pounder and its carriage are in fair order, and with some necessary repairs 
could soon be got ready for service. The carriages of the 7-pounders, however, are worn 
-out and unfit for further service. 

Tlie harness, though old, is in good order and repair. The ammunition also is very 
old and from its appearance is I think unfit for use. 

HARNESS AND SADDLERY. 

The harness in use in the division is generally very old, and the leather perished, 
necessitating repairs after each occasion on which it has been used on a trip. The bulk 
of it requires to be rented and at an early date. 

TRANSPORT. 

The transport of the division is worn out, and with few exceptions requires to be 
renewed before the coming season. 

FORAGE. 

The oats supplied this year are of excellent quality, and reasonable in price, costing 
only from twenty -seven to thirty-four cents per bushel. 

The hay supplied this year is also of good quality and reasonable, the price being 
five dollars and ninty cents per ton. 

TELEGRAPHS AND TELEPHONES. 

The Government telegraph frcwn Qu'Appelle to Edmonton passes through Battle- 
ford, at which point there is an office. There is also a telephone service between the 
barracks and different parte of the town, which is not, however, at the present time very 
efficient. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT GRIESBAGH 19 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

FIRE PROTECTION. 

A fire engine, complete with all hose appliances, is kept in a small house next to 
the well, which is in the centre of the square. There are three tanks of water in vari- 
ous positions in the inclosure, the capacity of which I am unable to accuratel}^ vouch 
for. As far as possible the necessary precautions are taken against the outbreak of 
fires, and the buildings are supplied with fire ladders, babcocks, fire buckets and water 
barrels. 

WATER SUPPLY. 

The water supply for the post is drawn from a well by means of a pump driven by 
a wind mill, which is useful and answers its purpose so long as there is wind enough to 
drive it, but as at present no tank has been supplied for the storage of water, there is a 
scarcity of this very necessary commodity when the wind fails which becomes at times, 
to say the least, very inconvenient. This would be obviated by the erection of a suit- 
able tank made to hold from one to two days' supply. 

ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

On account of the wet season the roads during the past year have been very heavy 
and muddy, otherwise, owing to the improvements put on them, they are in a fair and 
passable condition. 

Credit is due to the North-west government for the exertions they have made to 
improve both the roads and bridges in this district, as will be shown hereunder. 

On the Onion Lake trail, on the north side, the following improvements have been 
effected : — An addition has been built on the Flammand bridge at Jackfish Lake, a new 
one has been erected over Charett's Creek, another over Englishman's River, one over 
Pipestone's Creek, and one over Old Man's Creek. 

On the Battleford and Jackfish Road, the ' narrows ' of Jackfish Lake have been 
bridged. On the Saskatoon Road, a new bridge has been built over the West Branch 
Creek, and on this same trail twenty-two bridges and culverts have been repaired and 
improved, and where necessary, regraded. 

One bridge is required over the Little Red Deer on the Onion Lake Road, and when 
this has been erected that road will then be fully bridged and in a good passable con- 
dition. 

FERRIES. 

There is a government steam ferry which plies between the north and south banks 
of the Saskatchewan River, but owing to the formation of numerous sand-bars in the 
river, which are continually shifting, the service is not as efficient as it might be it 
steps were taken to keep the bars moving, which I am given to understand is a very 
simple matter to do. 

LIQUOR LAWS. 

The license system is in force in this district, and from what I have been able to 
learn, the law regarding it has been respected and observed. 

I have punished several persons for selling liquor to Indians, but no infringement 
other than this has been brought under my notice. 

GLANDERS, LUMPY JAW, AND TYPHOID FEVER. 

I am glad to be able to report that no cases of glanders were brought to my notice 
during the year. One case of lumpy jaw, however, was reported and dealt with by the 
veterinary staff sergeant, who also treated sixteen cases of typhoid, all of which re- 
covered. 

28— 2J 



20 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

SETTLEMENT AND AGRICULTURE. 

Owing to its distance from railway communication only a few new settlers came 
into the district during the past year. Some delegates, however, passed through the 
country and expressed themselves as well pleased with the outlook, and their visit will, 
I think, bear fruit in the future, especially as it is now understood that in all probability 
railway facilities will be given next year. 

RANCHING PROSPECTS. 

There are many ranches scattered over the various parts of the country which are 
said to be thriving. 

Cattle and horses do well, and there appear to be good openings for men of meang 
and energy to enter largely into the business of horse and cattle rearing. 

CREAMERIES. 

There is only one creamery at work in this district which is a private concern, the 
owner of which supplies the police butter, which is of excellent quality. 



GAME. 

Ducks, geese, prairie chickens and partridges were very plentiful this year, as also 
were antelope in some parts of the district. It is said that rabbits, according to their 
custom, are again increasing. 

FISHERIES. 

I am informed that both whitefish and lake trout are very plentiful in some parts. 
The police render any assistance required by the fishery inspector when called upon. 

RAILWAYS. 

At present there is no railway in my district. 

Saskatoon, ninety miles distant from Battleford, is at present the nearest point 
where railway facilities can be obtained. 

GENERAL EQUIPMENT. 

The equipment of the division cannot be said to be in good order, as most of it is 
very old and practically worn out, and requires renewing. 

BARRACK FURNITURE. 

We have just received thirty iron cots which will be a comfort to the men, and 
will add greatly to the appearance of the barrack rooms. 
The rest of the furniture is complete. 

IMPROVEMENTS TO BARRACKS. i 

Some slight repairs were effected by our own carpenter as a temporary measure, 
but much still requires to be done in the way of repairs and improvements at this pQ§]b» 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT QRIESBAGH 21 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

INDIANS AND HALF-BREEDS. 

The conduct generally of the Indians in this district has been good. Four only 
have been punished during the past year — one for supplying liquor to Indians, and three 
were committed for 'drunk and disorderly.' 

Relief in the way of free rations has been given to destitute half-breeds during 
the year, amounting to between $10 and f 15 per month. 

CANTEEN. 

A canteen is maintained at this post, which has been placed on a better footing 
than it was, and is now doing well, and is a convenience to the members of the division. 

INSPECTIONS. 

The division has been inspected twice during the year — first by the Assistant Com- 
missioner in December last, and the second time by yourself in the middle of November, 
1901. 

PRAIRIE FIRES. 

I am glad to say that no prairie fires have occurred in this district during the past 
year, and as snow is now on the ground, I think that all danger this season is over. 

MILEAGE. 

The total number of miles travelled by the horses of the division during the past 
year was 53,540, 

CRIME. 

I am glad to say that no crimes of a serious nature have occurred here during the 
past year. The only one which could be so classed was a case of cutting with a knife 
in a drunken aifray, which has been sent up for trial. 

I attach a classified summary of the cases dealt with during the year in which the 
nature of the crime is set forth ; but I have further to say that I believe that in the 
district there are a number of crimes committed, particularly with regard to horses and 
cattle, which cannot be traced home to the ofienders. Horses, and especially cattle, 
disappear, leaving no clue behind to enable the owners to bring forward a case, the sup- 
position being that the animals are killed by wandering Indians or half-breeds. Several 
such cases have been reported to me, but beyond the fact of the disappearance, the 
owner had no clue or information to give which would have enabled me to take the 
necessary action. I think that the weakness of the division in this district during the ' 
past two years, which prevented an efficient system of patrols from being established, 
is a cause of a great deal of the undiscovered crime. 

The total number of crimes dealt with was 36, and the number of prisoners con- 
fined in the guard-room was 18. 

No lunatics came under my notice during the year. 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Classified Summary of cases in ' C Division District for the year 1901. 



Classification. 



Offence against Indian Act — 

Supplying liquor to Indians 

Indians drunk , 

Offences against the person — 

Assault 

Offences against property — 

Cattle stealing ". 

Theft 

Forgery 

False pretenses 

Offences against public morals — 

Drunk and disorderly 

Creating a disturbance , 

Offences against North-west Territories ordinances 

Masters and servants 

Liquor license , 

Totals 







6 






£^ 




§ 




i 


> 






o 




o 


Q 


Q 


4 


4 




6 


4 


2 


8 


7 





2 




1 


5 


1 


4 


1 


1 




1 
3 






3 




1 


1 




3 


2 


1 


2 


2 




38 


25 


8 



Remarks. 



1 waiting. 
1 waiting. 
1 waiting. 



INCIDENTS AND OCCURRENCES. 

An outbreak of small-pox took place at the commencement of March in the Onion 
Lake district, which extended up to St. Paul des Metis. On the receipt of the news here, 
a party consisting of a non-commissioned officer and two men was at once sent to Onion 
I^ake, and as the disease spread, further reinforcements were despatched, amounting in 
all to one sergeant, one corporal and nine constables. One corporal was stationed at 
St. Paul des Metis. A strict quarantine was established, and all necessary steps taken, 
as far as possible, to prevent the spreading of the disease, such as disenfecting the 
houses and isolating the patients. Two doctors were sent by Dr. Patterson, one to 
Onion Lake and one to St. Paul des Metis, when the police surgeon was recalled. 

At the end of February, a prisoner named Francois Hamlin, who escaped from Fort 
Saskatchewan on July 18, 1900, was recaptured by the Onion Lake detachment and 
brought in to headquarters, and from there taken to Regina.. 

A sad accident occurred on July 18, when a boy named Oliver was drowned in the 
Saskatchewan River near the ferry landing. A party was sent to try and recover the 
body, but owing to the high water the search was unsuccessful. 

On July 11, Mr. Smart, the Deputy Minister of the Interior, paid a visit to 
Battleford. He travelled from Prince Albert on the north side of the river, and was 
met by myself at Redberry Lake, and from there driven to Battleford, which place he 
left next day en route for Saskatoon. 

On September 1 7, a party consisting of one officer, two staff sergeants, one sergeant 
and sixteen rank and file, with twenty-two horses, left this post for Regina for the 
purpose of forming part of the escort provided for their Royal Highnesses the Duke and 
Duchess of Cornwall and York. 

On November 12, Sergeant Parker, Constable Clisby and a hired special left 
Saskatoon in pursuit of certain Indians who were under suspicion of having killed 
cattle and also cut down telegraph poles near Humboldt. This party succeeded in 
capturing one of the suspects who was handed over to Sergeant Bird of ' F ' Division, 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT ORIESBAGH 23 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

as the party was operating out of its own district. They returned to Saskatoon after 
the completion of this duty, leaving the further action in the case in the hands of ' F ' 
Division. 

In view of the fact that two railways are about to come into this district, which 
will cause an influx of a mixed population, it is apparent that this division should be of 
such a strength, and state of efficiency, as will enable it to cope with the work that it 
will be called upon to perform. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

A. H. GRIESBACH, Supt., Commanding 'G' Division. 



24 NORTH- WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



APPENDIX B. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT G. B. MOFFATT, COMMAND- 
ING 'A' DIVISION, MAPLE CREEK. 

North-west Mounted Police, Maple Creek, Dec. 9, 1901 

The Commissioner, 

North-west Mounted Police, 

Regina. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following, my report, as commanding ' A ' 
Division and the Maple Creek District, for the year ended November 30, 1901. 

general state of the district. 

The winter of 1900-1 passed off as a very successful one. A very unusual sum- 
mer followed by a very wet autumn, and a heavy fall of snow towards the end of 
November, led most to expect the worst, and rather to dread the months following, 
however, matters turned out well. There were no prolonged periods of cold and very 
little snow, as a result stock did well until the spring of the year, then the lack of snow 
caused some suffering from want of water and the grass not coming on quickly. 
These wants were seasonably remedied by a steady and plentiful rain fall, under the in- 
fluences of which grass came on most abundantly, and I think that no more plentiful 
hay crop was ever cut. On account of the rapid growth of grass, the commencing of 
the cutting of hay upon government lands, which usually begins on July 25, was this 
year allowed on July 8. 

What was of benefit to the prairie, also exercised its influence upon the cultivated 
lands, the result being an unusually plentiful return of grain and vegetables. I must 
not omit to say that, though in the minority, there were some sufferers, heavy losers 
by hail. 

We were visited by hail storms on several occasions, they were, however, not 
general, but passing over strips of the country, flattened out everything that came in 
their way. A crop here would be destroyed while that of a neighbour adjoining would 
escape uninjured. 

The hailstones were of a most unusual size, but those which fell here were nothing 
to those at higher altitudes. 

Several cases of mange and lumpy jaw were reported by the patrols, but stock 
owners when spoken to, took*up and quarantined infected animals at once. 

A more serious trouble was the outbreak of anthrax at Swift Current on the 
ranche of the Canada Land and Ranche Co. 

The company sustained a heavy loss, but the early grappling with the disease and 
the stringent measures taken for quarantining overcame it. 

There have been a few cases of glanders, principally in the Medicine Hat District. 
Animals found infected have been destroyed by the veterinary inspectors in their re- 
spective Districts. 

There was an outbreak of small-pox in this place last winter, fortunately of a very 
mild type, it did not spread much, and no deaths resulted, the most serious inconven- 
ience being the quarantining of the district which affected the business interests of the 
place somewhat. 

Sheep seem to have taken quite a hold this year, with a result that some 8,552 
have been brought in from the south. Next year will, I think, see a greatly increased 
nimiber imported. Cattlemen are very much opposed to this. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT MOFFATT 25 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

For exports and imports of stock see attached statement. 

The visit of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York 
to the territories was an event of no small importance to the country generally, and to 
the force in particular in the furnishing of the escort, and I was pleased to be able to 
convey to those members of the division under Inspector Baker, who formed one troop, 
your expression of satisfaction at the manner in which they performed the duties 
required of them. The people in the different places along the railway were somewhat 
disappointed at not seeing anything of the Royal visitors when passing on their return 
journey from the coast. Here the station was decorated and quite an expectant crowd 
had gathered on the platform but the trains passed without stopping. 

The strike of the C.P.R. trackmen in the summer, which lasted some twelve weeks, 
was a great inconvenience, and though the company must, no doubt, have been losers, 
it was not through criminal damage to property, our men having been on duty at dif- 
ferent points while it lasted. 

CRIME, 

By comparing the classified summary of crimes which accompanies this, with that 
for last year, it will be observed that there has been quite an increase in the number of 
cases, not merely those entered, but also in those in which the defendants were 
convicted. The increase is happily not in crimes of a serious nature, but can be classified 
almost entirely under the vagrancy sections of the Crimin al Code. 

On September 26, it was reported to the non-commissioned oflicer in charge at 
Medicine Hat that a man named Sam Larson had come across from Montana, bringing 
with him a number of horses which he and had put across the river a few miles up and 
had himself come down and crossed near the town by the ferry. This man Larson 
some years previously had been living in the Medicine Hat district and so was known 
there. 

The non-commissioned oflicer above mentioned, Reg. No. 619, Staff-Sergt. Allen, 
knew Larson, and knew, further, that he was a bad character and was ' wanted ' in 
Montana. He therefore, with Mr. Walton, sub-collector of customs, took immediate 
steps towards effecting his arrest. It was at this time that Their Royal Highnesses the 
Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York, were making their journey, and several of the 
men from the division having been taken to form portion of the Royal Escort, I was 
rather short handed. With such men as were available, however, we managed to track 
Larson and get his horses from him one by one, iMitil he was finally left afoot, and the 
Royal Escort being no longer required, an oflicer. Inspector Baker, with additional men, 
took up the trail and Larson was captured on October 3. He appeared before Messrs. 
Crosskill and Cochran, two Justices of the Peace, the following day, on a charge of evading 
the customs, and was remanded until the 9th, when he came up again, and having been 
tried, was found guilty and sentenced to a fine of $50 and costs, or, in default of pay- 
ment, one month's imprisonment at hard labour. He chose the latter alternative and 
was brought down here to undergo his sentence. This man Larson is a desperate char- 
acter, as I have above stated, and there is a warrant out for him in Montana for assault 
in the first degree, which, being an extraditable offence, Sheriff Crawford from Fort 
Benton had come over for the purpose of going through the necessary formalities with a 
view to taking him back. Larson, having a month's imprisonment to undergo, would, 
it was thought, make this all right, and the required action for extradition was taken. 
I am sorry to have to report, though, that on the night of October 22, between 6 and 
6.30 o'clock, Larson made his escape from the guard-room and, despite every effort to 
recapture him, made his way out of the country and has not since been caught. His 
brother, Henry Larson, is now in the guard-room here on a charge of horse-stealing, but 
his case has not yet been heard. He-remains on remand. 

There was another escape no later than last month, when a prisoner who had been 
committed for trial at Medicine Hat on a charge of theft, jumped from the car while on 
the way here under escort. He took the leap when the train was on its way up hill to 
Dunmore and was in consequence running at a low rate of speed. This man was 
recaptured that afternoon and is now in the guard -room. 



26 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

There was one offence under the Brand Ordinance which resulted in a conviction, 
and of which I wish to make special mention. In August last, the American round-up 
had come across here hunting up their strays, and on the 7th of that month they had 
camped near the Ten Mile Police detachment. It was noticed that a cow bearing the 
W.W. brand, belonging to Wm. Wallace, a Montana stockowner, seemed loath to leave 
the bunch of Canadian stock from which she had been taken. Something was sus- 
pected and she was allowed to go loose, whereupon she made straight to the Canadian 
cattle from among which a calf came out to her. This was noticed by police who were 
there and others. Upon examining the calf it was found to have been branded 2 P.D., 
the brand of one Henry Marshall, a rancher in the vicinity. There was not a doubt 
about the cow being the mother of the calf, and it was taken away without any objection 
being raised by Marshall. 

One of the men from the detachment came in here and reported, laying an infor- 
mation against Marshall. The case came up for trial before Inspector Baker, J. P., and 
the defendant having been found guilty was fined $75 and costs, which he paid. 

What I wish to bring out is that the offence which I have here described is noth- 
ing less than cattle stealing, and in a ranching country, which this unquestionably is, 
stock raising being the industry, I do not think that it should be possible for an offender 
to escape with a fine, imprisonment without any option, even for a short term would 
have a much more deterrent effect. I must say, however, that I believe it to be a fact 
that the manipulating of brands goes on to a greater or less extent throughout the 
country and that the offences have been condoned by the owners of the animals 
operated upon. 

AMERICAN CATTLE. 

The evil of American cattle ranging this side of the ' Line ' still exists though there 
have been but few complaints. Canadian stock, both cattle and horses, find their way 
into our neighbour's territory, not to the same extent as we are intruded 
upon but in about the same proportion. The impossibility of preventing such intru- 
sions is recognized and assistance has been rendered on both sides in the rounding up 
and returning of stock to their respective side of parallel 49°. Unhappily, however, 
opportunities for such crooked work, as I described above, through the improper use of 
the brand are thus offered and taken advantage of. 

At the last sitting of the court h^re, which was on the 5th and 6th of November, 
before Judge Scott, there were five cases in connection with stock. The first to be heard 
was a charge against a man named John Hastie, a rancher living near here, of cattle 
stealing, in selling a steer, the property of J. H. Spencer, of Medicine Hat. The hide of 
the animal was brought up in evidence and bore Spencer's brand unmistakably, but 
notwithstanding this the result was an acquittal. 

The next case was one of horse stealing, in which J. Pierce, Jr., was the defendant. 
This young fellow, little more than a lad, was arrested at Battleford on a warrant issued 
at Medicine Hat. He was found guilty, but was permitted to go under suspended sen- 
tence, bonds to be given for his appearing any time within the next three years if 
called upon. There is another charge of horse stealing against him which will be 
heard when next the court sits at Medicine Hat. 

A case against A. McConnell who was committed for trial on a charge of cattle 
stealing was adjourned until next court, while a fourth, wherein T. M. Palmer, for 
fraudulent cattle dealing, was the defendant, was dismissed, the prosecutor not 
appearing. 

QUARANTINE, 

The district is still under quarantine so far as the shipment of cattle is concerned. 
None of these can be exported nor in fact loaded upon cars for transport until they 
have first been examined by a duly appointed veterinary inspector. I 
think that there should be another inspector for this district. At 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT MOFFATT 27 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

present there are but two, namely, Dr. Hargrave, V.S., who lives at Medicine Hat and 
whose district extends from Stair in the west of Medicine Hat to Walsh in the east, 
both inclusive, and Staff Sergt. Coristine of this force who takes in the railway from 
this place to, and including. Rush Lake. During the shipping season the stretch named 
with its various points is rather more than these officials can look after as demands for 
their services are frequently made from two or more points at the same time. The rule 
of first come first served obtains, and while the fairest, causes some grumbling on the 
part of impatient shippers. All live stock brought in by trail from the south is closely 
examined either here or at Medicine Hat. Sheep coming in are held south of the Hills 
and the inspector goes there for the purpose of examining them. 

At Ten Mile Detachment there is a quarantine ground and a sheep corral of wire 
netting, and iron posts were sent up for that place by the Department of Agriculture. 
It was put up this season as notice was given of the intended bringing in of sheep. 
Over 6,000 head were examined there and though the corral was found better than 
nothing it is not adapted to the work. An inclosure for the purpose should be close so 
that sheep cannot see through it. 

Under the head of ' Customs ' I give the number of animals imported by trail from 
the south through this outport, they were all examined and found free from disease, 
and the necessary certificate to that effect given to the owners. 

CUSTOMS. 

The work of an outport was carried out here and all duty collected forwarded to 
the Port of Lethbridge. The following are the numbers of different stock brought in 
from the south by both settlers, under free entry and others. Horses, 492 ; cattle, 113 
and sheep, 8,552. 

INDIANS. 

There is but little to be said with reference to Indians, there being no more than 
a few stragglers, who are non-treaty. They earn a precarious living in various ways, 
the polishing and selling of buffalo horns being their chief occupation. Quite a number 
of Indians passed through here this summer on their way from Battleford and the north 
and from Duck Lake, they had passes and were on their way to a ' Sun Dance ' which 
was to come off at Havre in Montana. 

There were but six breaches of the Indian Act, all connected with liquor and re- 
sulting in convictions. 

STRENGTH OF DIVISION. 

The nominal strength of the division is 40 all told, this, as can readily be under- 
stood, with the increasing number of settlers, and the extent of country throughout 
which they are located is hardly sufficient, and I trust that it may be found possible to 
slightly increase it. 

Inspector Baker's transfer to this division in February last afforded me the assist- 
ance of a second officer which was very much required, the previous jea,T I paving been 
alone (the absence of officers in South Africa rendering it impossible to give me a second) 
enabled me fully to appreciate it. 



28 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

DETACHMENTS. 

There has not been any change made in the detachments, which are : — 





Men. 

1 
2 
1 
3 
3 
1 
3 


Horses. 




Saddle. 

1 

"'"i" 

3 
3 
1 
3 


Team. 


Maple Creek Village 




Medicine Hat , 

Swift Current 

Medicine Lodge 


2 
2 


Ten Mile 

Farwell 


2 


East End 


2 



All the above detachments are well situated and in localities where they can patrol 
to the best advantage, with one exception, namely, Farwell, and I would suggest a 
change there. In its present place, though there is an increasing number of settlers in 
the vicinity, Farwell is out of the way, that is, that unlike the other outposts to the 
south of the Hills, it is not on any travelled trail from the south. During the two past 
summers quite a number of intending settlers and others have come in from Montana, 
notably from the town of Havre, which lies due south of this place on the Great North- 
ern Railway, and passing by the east end of Davis' Lake leave Farwell away to the 
eastward. Though there would not be the slightest difficulty for parties coming in with , 
dutiable goods in the shape of live stock to avoid police detachments, these are more or 
less of a check as all travellers are stopped, their outfits checked, and directions given to 
report here. 

I would, therefore, suggest the removal of Farwell detachment from where it is to 
some suitable point on the trail referred to, and that instead of having one man only its 
strength be increased to three. There should also be one or more detachments to the 
north of us. 

HEALTH. 

I submit herewith the report of Dr. Deane, who, practicing in the village of Maple 
Creek, attends the division medically at this post and all detachments, with the excep- 
tions of Medicine Hat and Medicine Lodge, arrangements having been made with Dr. 
Calder, a resident at the former, for the medical care of the men at these places. 

CLOTHING. 

The abolition of several of the old articles of kit and the introduction of others 
which the new dress regulations are to bring about will be a great improvement, and 
much appreciated. 

DRILL. 

Drill both, mounted and dismounted, was carried on here throughout the early 
part of the year regularly, and again later for the purpose of perfecting the men re- 
quired to form part of the escort for His Royal Highness the Duke of Cornwall and 
York. 

TARGET PRACTICE. 

The annual practice with both carbine and revolver was carried on as opportuni- 
ties offered, but through force of circumstances had to be extended over a considerable 
period. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT MOFFATT 29 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

The calls upon the division for duties of unusually long periods such as the railway 
strike, the Royal Visit referred to above, and the chasing of the prisoner Larson 
all interfered with its speedy carrying out. 

Reg. No. 1985 Sergt. Macleod made the top score at both carbine and revolver 
practice, 205 and 150 respectively. 

I cannot too strongly condemn the ammunition of the Dominion Cartridge Company's 
make. This was used at revolver practice. With it misfires were frequent, it being a 
rare instance to discharge th& six shots from the revolver without one or more occurring, 
while their penetrating power is little more than sufficient to put a ball through an inch 
board. At the longest range the ball would stop at a second thickness on the back of 
the target. 

Reg. No. 3446 S. Sergt. Coristine received a rather severe injury to his right eye 
while at practice, but whether it was due to the cartridge or the carbine cannot be 
determined. Dr. Deane in his report mentions the extent of the hurt. 

TRANSPORT. 



The transport at the post is all in good order. 
The sleighs are all that are required. 



FORAGE. 

Our contract for oats during last year was in the hands of the Calgary Milling 
Company, Ltd., of Calgary. 

This year a contract has been made with Messrs. Dixon Bros., merchants, in the 
village here. They will make delivery in quantities as required. 

The oats which they purpose delivering have been grown in the neighbourhood, the 
season, as I have already stated, having been very profitable to such of the settlers who, 
with their ranching, also put in seed. 

The hay at the post was this year put in by weight instead of by measurement as 
formerly, and is of first class quality. 

TELEPHONE. 

Two new instruments were sent by the department from Ottawa for the line 
between barracks and the village, and are a vast improvement on those which we had 
been using. One of the old ones is still in use in the guard room, which is switched on 
during the night or whenever the office is closed. 

RAILROADS, ASSISTANCE TO. 

Assistance for the protection of their property was asked for by the C.P.R. during 
the trackmen's strike, and was furnished. 

SADDLERY AND HARNESS. 

The harness I cannot say much for. The heavy harness is not in what might be 
classed as very good order. Sergt. Forbes, who was sent here from Regina for the pur- 
pose, overhauled all there was in the division, with the exception of two sets which were 
at East End and Medicine Lodge detachments. These could not be brought in. 

RATIONS. 

We are again for 1901-2 being supplied by the Hudson's Bay Company, Winnipeg. 



so NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

HORSES. 

The division's strength in horses is forty-seven of which twenty-five are team and 
twenty-two saddle. 

Twelve remounts were purchased during the year which it may be said are all doing 
well, though unavoidably subjected to work which must naturally have been extremely 
trying. 

PATROLS. 

Each detachment patrolled its district regularly. Local patrols were sent out from 
district headquarters, whenever men were available, to districts not touched by detach- 
ments. 

Two patrols were made to the Red Deer Forks, the settlers en route being visited. 
Special patrols were made from East End Post to Pelletier's Lake, also from Ten Mile 
to Milk River and East along the boundary. On the whole the district was patrolled 
to a greater extent than during former years. 

With respect to the buildings there is little to be gone into in the way of estimate 
that was not dealt with last year, but, I would urge the advisability of providing for 
the placing of the various houses on stone foundations as early during the summer of 
1902 as possible, more especially those that have cellars, in fact I consider that the 
cellar underneath the division mess kitchen, and possibly the Commanding Officers 
quarters, cannot be looked to too soon, for owing to the very small space between their 
walls and those of the buildings above them, their caving in causes a more rapid 
settling of such buildings. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

GEO. B. MOFFATT, 

Supt. Commanding ' A ' Division. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT M OFF ATT 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

EXPORTS. 



31 



From. 


Cattle. 


Horses. 


, Sheep. 


Wool. 


Maple Creek 


4,060 

4,821 

38 

36 

2,067 


412 

799 

34 


4,343 
4,468 
1,600 


"■ 'm',756' 




Gull Lake 




Rush Lake 


130 












Totals 


11,022 


1,375 


10,411 


171,750 





IMPORTS. 



At. 


Cattle. 


Horses. 


Sheep. 


Maple Creek 

Medicine Hat 


4,309 

10,508 

87 

395 


207 
1.257 


1,039 
117 




80 


Rush Lake 










.... 


Totals 


15,299 


1,464 


1,236 



November 30, 1901. 



DISTRIBUTION. 





1 

1 


1 


1 

1 


1 


-1 

1 


1 


40 


OB 

3 • 


Horses. 


Place. 


1 1 1 


3 


Maple Creek 


1 


1 


2 


1 
1 


2 


13 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
3 
1 


3 
...... 


23 
2 

1 
3 
3 

1 
3 

1 


12 
2 

1 
3 

3 
1 
1 

1 


17 

2 
■■*2" 


29 
2 


Swift Current 








1 








1 









5 


Ten Mile. 






5 


Farwell . . 












1 


East End 












3 


Town Station 













1 












■ "■■ 






1 


1 


3 2 


2 


25 


3 


37 


24 


23 


47 



32 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
"A" DIVISION. 

Classified summary of cases entered, and convictions obtained, during the year ended 

30th November, 1901. 



Crime. 



Offences against the person — 

Assault . 

Offences against property — 

Bringing stolen property into Canada 

Theft .. 

Forgery. 

Horse stealing 

Cattle stealing . . . 

Fraud 

Allowing dogs to worry cattle 

Offences against public order — 

Carrying concealed \^'eapons 

Riding bicycle on sidewalk 

Offences against Customs Act — 

Evading payment of customs 

Aiding and abetting evasion . . . 

Offences against religion and morals— 

Drunk and disorderly, &c 

Vagrancy 

Inmate of house of ill-fame 

Frequenter . . 

Using abusive language 

11 threatening m 

Offences against Indian Act — 

Indian drunks 

Supplying liquor to Indians 

Liquor in possession.. 

Offences against Railway Act — 

Stealing rides 

Corruption and disobedience — 

Escaping from custody 

Refusing inf ormati<5n to census enumerator . 

Obstructing }:>eace officer 

Offences against N. W. T. ordinances- 
Insanity 

Masters and servants 

Health , 

Hawkers 

Liquor ordinance 

Prairie fire 

Brand ordinance 

Game h 



Cases 
entered. 



13 

2 
11 
1 
4 
4 
1 
1 

1 
3 

1 

1 

79 
21 
7 
3 
2 
1 

2 
2 
2 



Con- 
victions. 



192 



164 



x c3 fl 



Remarks. 



Awaiting trial, 1. 
Awaiting trial, 1. 

Awaiting trial, 2. 
Awaiting trial, 1. 



Awaiting trial, 1. 



Nov. 30, 1900. In gaol 1 

Received December 1, 1900, to Nov. 30, 1901 55 

Total 56 

■^Discharged 51 

Nov. 30, 1901. Remaining 5 

*0f these 3 were lunatics. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT HOWE 33 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



APPENDIX C. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT JOSEPH HOWE, COMMANDING 

' D ' DIVISION, MACLEOD. 

North-west Mounted Police, Macleod, November 30, 190L 
The Commissioner, 

North-west Mounted Police. 

Regina. 

Sir, — I have the honour to render j^ou my report for the past year. 

GENERAL STATE OF THE DISTRICT. 

On June 11, I took over the command of the district from Inspector Moodie. The 
year just passed has been very favourable for ranchers and the country generally has 
been blessed with prosperity. The winter losses in cattle were comparatively small, the 
principal being two year heifers dying in calving in the spring, owing to the weak 
condition they were in from want of proper feed. 

The weather generally has been all that could be desired. A severe hail storm 
passed over the immediate district on August 8, but no damage was reported to crops, 
&c. 

During the first week of September, a heavy snow storm fell over the Cardston 
district, which damaged the crops to some extent. 

More settlers have come into this district during the past year than in any previous 
years, they appear to lie of a good class. 

The price of horses has increased and ranchers are turning their attention to horse 
breeding, which, owing to the low prices for the past three or four years has been 
neglected. 

There have been more cattle exported for beef out of the district this year than in 
any previous year, a large number of dogies or eastern cattle have been imported and 
are doing well on the ranges. 

Recruiting for the South African Constabulary commenced here and at Pincher 
Creek on February 21, when 26 recruits were enrolled, including 10 constables of this 
division, who were given a free discharge. They left here for Ottawa on February 28. 

On April 1, the Macleod Coroner was called to Pincher Creek to hold an inquest on 
a Chinaman found dead in his shack, he died of heart failure. 

At about 1 p.m., of April 2, a very high wind from the west set in and blew down 
part of the wagon shed on the south side. 

An accident occurred at the Macleod Hotel on April 16, at which time it was 
quarantined for small-pox, while a man named Simon Palmer, who was a guest there, was 
leaning over the balcony rail it gave way, and he fell on the top of his head, causing 
concussion of the brain ; he died the following day. 

Colonel Dent, of the Imperial Service, arrived here on June 24, to purchase remounts 
for the army. He purchased 105 head, and at Pincher Creek on the 27th purchased 
57. He was very much pleased with the class of horses shown him, and decided, owing 
to the short notice given of his coming, that he would return on August 5, when some 
five or six hundred were shown him, out of which he purchased 1 24 head. I gave him 
every assistance both here, and at Pincher Creek. 

Drs. Bell and Codd arrived here on September 3, and on the 4th and 5th sat as a 
medical board hearing cases of claims for compassionate allowance for men wounded in 
South Africa. 
28—3 



34 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

On September 20, I left here with three officers and forty-two N.C. officers and 
men for Calgary by trail to take part in the review by the Duke of Cornwall and York 
on the 28th. Supt. Deane and twenty N.C. officers and men of ' K ' Division accom- 
panied us on the line of march. We had very unpleasant weather during the trip and 
arrived in Calgary on 23rd and went into camp. 

On October 1, a Peigan Indian named 'Strong Buffalo' was found dead on the 
Peigan reserve. I sent St. Sergt. Hilliard to investigate the case and Dr. Forbes, who 
was then acting as medical officer for the Indians, examined him, and found his neck 
broken, and from the indications of the ground it appeared that his horse had fallen and 
rolled over him. The coroner did not think it necessary to hold an inquest on him. 

On October 5, an ex-policeman named Edward Denne died very suddenly at the 
McCrae Bros, ranche from heart failure. The N. W.M.P. Veterans Association took charge 
of the body and buried him the following day. 

On October 13, I received a telegram from Dr. Malcolmson of Blairmore, stating 
that he was bringing down a lunatic by train. I sent Asst. Surgeon Haultain to meet 
the train, and he brought him to our hospital. His name is Eugene Costonguay, he had 
attempted to cut his throat. He remained in hospital until fit to travel, when he was 
committed to the Brandon Asylum, and left for there under escort on November 5. 

During the strike on the C.P.R., I stationed a N.C. officer and constable at Cowley 
as instructed by you. The majority of the section men over the Crow's Nest branch 
kept to their work during the strike and no damage to the track or rolling stock was 
done. 

Blairmore on the C. N. railway is virtually a new town. Adjoining Blairmore is 
Franktown, a mining town which sprang into existence in the past six months. It was 
started by Mr. Frank of Montana, who has bought large coal interests there. The town 
is rapidly going ahead. Mr. Gebo is manager for the mines and at present there are 175 
men employed by him. 

The McLaren lumber mill about four miles above Blairmore employs about sixty men. 

Cardston, which is the centre of the Mormon settlement is a flourishing town with 
a population of about 1,000, doing a great quantity of mercantile and other business. 
It was incorporated last July, and now enjoys a mayor and town council. Mr. Charles 
Ora Card, one of the pioneers of this settlement was justly honoured by being selected 
the first mayor. Mountain View, Etna, Leavitt, Caldwell and Taylorville are villages 
in the district, and are rapidly assuming fair proportions. These people have worked 
wonders in the Cardston district since their immigration into Canada, and I feel sure 
they will continue to be of great benefit to the country. They possess pluck, determin- 
ation and thrift, and are determined to succeed, and this portion of Southern Alberta 
bids fair to be a well populated and thoroughly prosperous community before many 
years. The proposed extension of the St. Mary's River Railway from Spring Coulee 
to Cardston, will be a great boon to these people, but many think that an extension of 
the Calgary and Edmonton line from Macleod to the boundary line would be of still 
greater benefit. There are only two hotels in this settlement and these are at Cardston. 
A poll is to be held at the end of this month for the purpose of deciding whether or not 
liquor licenses shall be granted in the district, and as the great majority of voters are 
Mormons who are adverse to the use of liquor, the probability is that the sale will be 
prohibited in the Cardston district. 

INFECTIOUS DISEASES. 

On March the 11th, a case of small-pox was reported in the family of Mr. Stedman, 
in town, and another case on March 19 in that of ex-constable Macdonald. Three of 
his children had been running about the town suffering from a mild form of the disease 
for several days before being examined by a doctor. 

On April 1 2, the Macleod Hotel was quarantined for small-pox, one of the guests, a 
C. P. R. operator, being found there suffering from the disease. He was moved to the 
isolated hospital and the rest of the guests being kept under quarantine for sixteen days, 
when they were released after being thoroughly disinfected by the health officer. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT HOWE 35 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

At the request of the town council two men were sent to assist the special constables 
sworn in by that body. 

There are at present two cases of diphtheria in town. Both of them have been 
quarantined by the health officer, Dr. Kennedy. 

Inspector Davidson reports two cases of chicken-pox at Pincher Creek on Novem- 
ber 21, they have been isolated. One of them, a family named Jackson, being utterly 
destitute, I instructedlnspector Davidson to supply them with rations for their immediate 
wants and reported the case to the Deputy Minister of Agriculture at Regina. 



PATROLS. 

On May 24, Sergt. Major Genereux with three constables and a pack outfit left to 
patrol into the Livingstone range, it having been reported that cattle and horses stolen 
off the prairie were driven in there and cached. It appears that this was an old story. 
The patrol returned on June 21, and reported that no horses or cattle were seen, neither 
could they find out that any one had seen, or heard of, horses or cattle ever being in 
there. 

Inspectors Davidson and Irwin have patrolled the Pincher Creek, St. Mary's and 
Cardston districts, and officers from the post have patrolled the northern part of the 
district, reports of which have been forwarded to you from time to time. 



INDIANS. 

The behaviour of the Indians of the Blood and Peigan reserves has been very good. 
The Bloods have put up large contracts of hay during the past summer, the principal 
being the Cochrane Ranche Co., 800 tons, and the Brown Ranche Co. 400 tons, and lots 
of smaller contracts. They sold quite a lot around the town. They are, however, not 
allowed to sell hay without a permit from the agent, and when they cannot produce 
it the police take the money they get for the hay and send it to the agent from 
whom I suppose they subsequently receive it. They are quiet and well behaved when 
about the town, but have a natural fondness for liquor which they manage to get, and 
are extremely reticent and evasive as to where they get it, making a conviction against 
the one who supplies it very difficult. Both reserves were paid their treaty on the 5th 
and 6th of November and during the time they were trading in town there was quite a 
lot of drunkenness among them. I had four of our Indian scouts on duty under Sergt. 
Camies in town, and cannot speak too highly of the way in which they did their work, 
especially 'Peigan Frank' who has no friends when duty has to be done. 

The Blood Indians have sold over 1,000 head of ponies this year to eastern buyers 
who ship them east where they find a ready market. They are breeding larger horses. 

Indians are doing remarkably well with the cattle issued to them by the depart- 
ment, some having from 50 to 75 head. 

There have been 45 convictions against Indians for being drunk, and 25 persons 
brought to trial for supplying liquor to them, resulting in a conviction of 17. 



CROPS. 

I am glad to report that the crops throughout this district are excellent, in the 
Cardston district the yield of fall wheat averaging 35 bushels to the acre, while some 
went as high as 50 bushels. The irrigation ditch in this district was not required this 
season. In the Pincher Creek district the average yield of fall wheat was 45 bushels, 
and oats 65 bushels. The root crops were fairly good. The farmers in this district say 
this has been one of the best years they have seen. Threshing is still going on all over 
the district. 



28-3J 



36 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

ASSISTANCE TO DEPARTMEXT OF AGRICULTURE. 

The veternary staff of this division have been kept very busy during the past year, 
Insp. Burnett, Y.S., being away a good deal of the time engaged in examining remounts 
for the force, and Staff Sergeant Fraser inspecting cattle and horses for export. Eight 
thousand and fifteen head of cattle and 1,756 head of horses were inspected for export 
to eastern and western markets. 

On the 5th, 6th and 7th November, Inspector Burnett inspected 41,565 sheep im- 
ported by Knight ct Sons, from Montana. These sheep were corralled at Lonely Valley 
on the boundary line and were found to be free from any contagious disease. 

On November 13, Inspector Burnett left for Lonely Valley to inspect another im- 
portation of sheep from Montana, numbering 17,731, which were found to be free from 
contagious disease. The}^ were imported by C. McCarty. 

Staff Sergeant Cotter, in charge of the St. Mary's detachment, inspects all cattle, 
horses, Arc, coming in from Montana, and has performed this duty very efficiently, as no 
animals suffering from diseases of a contagious or infectious nature have come to my 
knowledge in this district. He performs this work in addition to his police duties, but 
gets no pay for it, as he is not a qualified veterinary surgeon. He collects all fees for 
the inspection of animals. 

One constable went with each of the rounds up in this district, viz., Pincher Creek, 
Mosquito Creek, Oxley and Willow Creeks, and only five cases of mange were found. 
These were taken up by the owners, and treated, and seven cases of lumpy jaw were 
destroyed. 

DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS. 

Staff-Sergeant Hilliard, at Stand Off Detachment, is the preventive officer appointed 
by the customs department to enforce the Customs Act among the Blood Indians. 

CONDUCT. 

The conduct of the men of this division has been very good on the whole. Four 
men were dismissed from the force by your orders for drunkenness. 

DESERTIONS. 

Reg. No. 3568 while on duty at Lethbridge, deserted on May 14. 

DRILL AND TRAINING. 

The division has been drilled, both mounted and dismounted, whenever possible, a 
large number of the N.C. officers and men on detachment were brought in for the Duke 
of York's escort, when practically the whole division were drilled together for the 
first time. 

Lectures on police duties have been given by myself and other officers during the 
summer. 

TARGET PRACTICE. 

The whole division has been put through the annual target practice, and, with one 
or two exceptions, all went through the preliminary practice. 

ARMS AND AMMUNITION. 

This division is armed with the Lee Metford Carbine, which are in good order. 
The Enfield revolvers are old and the rifling worn out. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT HOWE 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



37 



The Dominion make cartridges for the Enfield revolver is of very inferior make, 
and it is impossible to do good shooting with it. 

HEALTH OF DIVISION. 

The health of the division has been excellent. 

On April 1 2, Inspector Moodie sent Sta£f-Sergeant Stewart to investigate a reported 
case of small-pox, in a family named Marlowe, living on a ranche about six miles from 
'here. He reported to Acting Asst. Surgeon Forbes that there was small-pox in the 
family, and that he had been in touch with it. Dr. Forbes ordered him and the 
teamster to be quarantined. They were quarantined for sixteen days and then 
thoroughly disinfected and returned to duty. 

Reg. No. 3409 Const. J. B. Hay, accidentally shot himself at Kipp en the 1st of 
November. In taking off his cartridge belt the revolver dropped out of the holster and 
the hammer striking the floor, caused the discharge of the cartridge, the bullet entering 
the leg above the ankle, and coming out just above the calf. He will suffer no 
permanent disability. 

CHANGES IN STRENGTH 



Gain. 


CO 




-g 


1 


1 
& 


i 
1 

00 


i 
1 

m 

|l 

m 


H 


Engaged 












1 

4 

5 

21 


14 
...... 


15 


Re-engaged after leaving 






'■3' 

3 


2 


"2" 


4 


Re-engaged witTbout leaving 

Prom other Divisions 


...... 


■■■5 ■ 


11 
33 




1 


5 


6 


3 


2 


31 


15 


63 


Loss. 


1 
•E 


so 

h- 1 


1 


+5 


c5 


1 

1 


36 
I 


3 
^ 


Discharged 










1 1 


21 


23 


Discharged free, S. A. C 










10 
2 

I 

4 

12 


10 















2 


Deserted 








.. ..; 


1 


Dismissed . . . , 






4 


To other Divisions .... 




1 


3 




1 i 


17 














1 


3 




2 1 30 

1 


21 


57 



38 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
Distribution State of 'D' Division, November 30, 1901. 



Station. 


I 


M 


f 
1 


"■3 

> 


1 

1 
1 

1 


1 


i 

a 

a 


1 

OS 

1 


1 
1 


-SO 

1 

6 

"i' 
"i" 


H 

44 
6 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
7 
4 
3 
1 
7 


1 

41 
7 
3 
3 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 

6 

4 
1 


i 

I 


Macleod 


1 


3 

1 


1 


1 


4 


i" 


4 


24 
4 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
I 


1 


Pincher Creek. . . 




Big Bend 




1 
















1 


















1 


Peigan . . . . 


















Mosquito Creek 
















1 


















1 


















7 


Town Patrol 












1 






Stand Off 










1 
1 




2 
3 
1 

■4' 


4 
"i" 

■2" 




St, Marys 














1 




... 














Blairniore 










1 




On Command 












1 


., . 




1 


5 


1 


1 


6 


3 


6 


49 


15 


87 


80 


8 



SADDLERY AND HARNESS. 



The saddlery is in first class shape. The harness on hand is in good condition. 
The repairs are done by our own saddler. 



transport. 



The transport of this division is in very fair condition with the exception of three 
heavy wagons which should be condemned and sold. 



telephones. 



The telephone line between Lethbridge and Macleod is not working very satisfac- 
torily, it being continually out of repair. A line from here to Stand Off would mean a 
great saving in time, and three scouts could be dispensed with, all despatches for the 
southern detachments being carried by scouts to and fro daily, the saving in pay, would 
pay for the line in a year. 



CANTEEN. 



The canteen at this post is in a good financial condition, 
thing it buys, and is a great boon to the command. 



It pays cash for every- 



RECREATION ROOM. 



Is well supplied with daily, weekly and illustrated papers and magazines. 
The library contains over 500 volumes and is kept up entirely at the men's expense, 
the monthly subscription being 25 cents per man. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT HO WE 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

OUTPOSTS SUMMER MONTHS. 



S9 







:iQ 
































Place. 


i 


i 


i 


i 


1 










au 
f3 


1 


t 




"S 




o 


.2 
"S 
o 




(— 1 


02 


m 


^ 


^ 


m 


III 


^ 


Pincher Creek 


1 




1 


..... 


3 


1 


7 




Big Bend 








1 


2 




3 




Kootenai 










2 

2 




2 
2 












Peigan 


.... 




.... 




1 


1 


1 




Mobquito Creek 












2 





2 




Leavings 










3 




3 




Kipp 










1 


i 






Town Patrol 






i 












Stand Off . 




.,.' 






2 
4 


5 
1 


5 

7 




St. Mary's 


1 


1 




1 


Cardston 




1 


;;;::: 




1 

1 




2 
1 




Blainnore 






Cowley, during C.P.R. strike 






1 




1 











Total 


2 


2 


4 


1 


25 


9 


35 


8 



INSPECTION OF OUTPOSTS. 

The Leavings and Mosquito Creek detachments have been inspected monthly by 
either Inspectors Begin or Hefferman. 

The Peigan and Porcupines by Inspector Begin and by myself. Inspector David- 
son is stationed at Pincher Creek, and has charge of that place and Kootenai. I have 
inspected Pincher Creek twice during the summer. Supt. Deane inspected both of 
these detachments also. 

Inspector Irwin is stationed at Cardston, and has charge of that place and St. 
Mary's. This sub-district is under the supervision of Supt. Deane and has been inspected 
by him during the summer. 

Stand Off and Big Bend have been inspected monthly by Inspectors McGibbon and 
Hefferman, and once by myself. 

With the number of men on the detachments, these districts have been I consider 
well patrolled, almost daily patrols are made in the different parts, and the settlers 
visited, and the men are familiar with every portion of their districts. Friendly relations 
exist between the police and settlers. 

The settlers have been unanimous in their praise of the men for the strict yet 
courteous manner in which they have performed their duties. 

BARRACK FURNITURE. 

Forty-eight iron cots have been received lately, and they make a great improve- 
ment to the appearance of the barrack rooms, besides adding to the comfort of the men. 



FIRE PROTECTION. 



The fire engine at this post is in good working order, and the water tank is kept 
full at all times, fire pails are kept full of water in the barracks and guardrooms. 
Babcocks and hand grenades are placed in the most convenient places, and kept freshly 



charged. 



The men are exercised in fire drill and know their stations thoroughly. 



*) 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



HORSES. 



Gain. 


w 


1 


Loss. 


w 


i 
& 


Purchased .•.••.•, 

From other divisions 


39 
2 




Cast and sold 

Died 


33 

1 
2 
9 

1 
1 


4 




Destroyed , . . 






To other divisions 

Eleturned to Mr. Woolf 

n Mr. Lane 

Total 




Total 


41 


46 


4 



The present state of the division is 56 saddle horses, 25 team horses and 8 pack 
horses. 

The remounts have turned out well, taking into consideration that most of them 
had to be trained for the Duke of York's escort, and in such a short time they did remark- 
ably well. The squads going to the rifle range took their horses with them, thus getting 
them accustomed to the sound of fire arms, and being picketed by the heel. All the 
horses in the division are in good condition and fit for police work. 



PRAIRIE FIRES. 



On October 24, a prairie fire started on the Peigan reserve at Scot's coulee, and 
burnt over an area of four miles, by one and a half miles. It was supposed to have 
been started by a passing locomotive, or by section men burning a fire guard, the In- 
dians and section men put it out. No damage to property was done. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT HOWE 41 

SESSIONAL PAP5R No. 28 

CRIME. 

The following is a classified summary of crimes in the Macleod district during 
the year : — 



Nature of Offences. 



Offences against public order — 

Challenge to fight a duel 

Having weapon on person when arrested . 
Offences against morals — 

Incest 

Rape and seduction 

Vagrancy 

Drunk and disorderly conduct 

Keeping house of ill-fame 

Inmates of house of ill-fame 

Offences against the person — 

Wounding 

Assaults 

Offences against property — 

Killing cattle . 

Horse stealing 

Theft 

Forgery 

Mischief, miscellaneous 

Bringing stolen property into Canada. . . . 
Offences against the Indian Act — 



Supplying intoxicants to Indians. 
Indii 



lians into.xicated 

Having intoxicants in jxjssession 

Having intoxicants on Indian Reserve 
Offences against N.W.T. Ordinances — 

Setting out prairie fire 

Profanation of the Lords Day . . 

License, liquor Ordinance 

Health Ordinance , . 

Drunk while iuterdicted 

Miscellaneous 



O 



1 
1 

1 
3 
9 

59 
5 

11 

2 
12 

4 

14 

6 

2 

1 

1 

25 

49 

9 

3 

1 
8 
5 
3 
4 
7 



246 



17 

45 

6 



182 



o 
2-g 



64 



Some of the above cases call for a little comment. The case of challenging to fight 
a duel, a man named Sampson Jackson, residing at Pincher Creek, fancied he had suf- 
fered some wrong from a lawyer named A. C. Kemmis, and went to his office and 
invited him out in the street to have it out at sixteen paces, the weapons to be revolvers. 
This man was committed for trial and brought before Judge Scott, on November 14. 
He asked to be tried by jury, and was released on his recognizance to appear at the 
assizes in March next. 

The case of incest, wherein no conviction was obtained, Richard Yadnais, of 
Boundary Creek, was arrested on the information of his wife and committed for trial 
by the Justice of the peace at Cardston. He was brought before the judge at the March 
assizes, when the Crown prosecutor entered a nolle prosequi. 

The two cases of rape, 'Hank,' a Blood Indian woman, laid information against 
'Black White Man' and 'Tom Daly,' two Bloods, who were tried and the cases dis- 
missed for lack of corroboration. 

The case of seduction mentioned in last year's report was dismissed by the judge at 
the March assizes for want of corroboration. 

The charge of wounding. On January 27, a telephone message was received from 
the C. P. R. station that two Italians named Yenere and Magrulio had stabbed each 



42 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

other in a box car, and asked to have some men sent over to arrest them. They were 
brought to barracks. They had injured one another considerably. Venere was taken 
into hospital here with seven knife wounds in his body. Some six inches of bowel pro- 
truded from his abdomen and an ugly cut in the left side of the chest. Magrulio was 
taken to the guard-room suffering from a broken finger and two broken ribs. MagruHo 
had $950 on his person and Venere $845. Venere's story was that he was lying on his 
bed in the car where they were living, and the other man came to him and began stab- 
bing him. He picked up an axe and began defending himself. They had their prelimi- 
nary trial on March 9, and Magrulio w^as committed for trial. Venere was remanded 
from time to time until the 27th, when the information was dismissed against him. 
Magrulio was tried before Judge Rouleau with a jury and acquitted. The jury could not 
decide which was to blame. 

Of twelve cases of assault, seven were convicted, one w^thdrawm, three dismissed 
and one not tried. The latter was a common assault and the defendant has left the 
district. 

The schedule shows four cases of cattle killing. Two of these were sent to the 
Supreme Court, those of ' George Dog Child ' and ' Jim,' two Indians, and as according to 
the evidence, the animal which, belonging to the Brown Ranching Co., was found dead 
by them on the prairie, killed by wolves or coyotes, the judge dismissed the case. The 
other two, that of ' Commodore ' and ' Yellow Face,' two Indians, was dismissed by the 
magistrates, there being no evidence to convict. 

Of the fourteen cases of horse stealing, wherein only two convictions were made, 
five were thrown out by the examining magistrate, and seven were acquitted by the 
Supreme Court. 

In Rex vs. Wolf, a Sarcee* Indian was charged with having stolen on June 29 a 
grey gelding from ' Owl Moccasin,' a Blood Indian, and sold the same to a section fore- 
man at West Macleod. On November 14 he was found guilty by Judge Scott and 
released on suspended sentence. 

In Rex vs. *]^ice Rider' or 'Handsome Rider,' a Blackfoot Indian was charged 
with stealing a bay gelding from ' Mike,' a Blood Indian, on June 27, 1900. On Novem- 
ber 1 3 he pleaded ' guilty ' before Judge Scott and was released on his own recognizance 
of S400 to appear for sentence when called on. 

In Rex vs. Fisher. On July 4, Mr. John R. Craig, of Meadow Creek, made com- 
plaint that two men named Cuffling and Stagg, employees of Fishers, had driven away a 
bunch of unbranded horses claimed by him (Craig). These horses were eventually found 
by Craig at Millarville with Fisher's brand on. A warrant was issued for their arrest on 
the information of Sergeant Camies and Fisher. Cuffling and Stagg had their prelimin- 
ary trial in August last, and were committed for trial and were released by order of 
Mr. Justice Scott on substantial bail. The horses stolen were two three-year-old fillies, 
one two-year-old filly and three yearlings. The defence claimed that the three-year-old 
fillies got away from Fisher in 1899 when yearlings, the two-year-old in 1900, and the 
colts this spring. They produced witnesses who swore that Fisher owned these or some 
of these horses. One of the witnesses, a relative of Fisher's, was brought from Ontario^ 
his trade being that of a lumberman. This man in 1899 was staying with Fisher and 
knew his horses, and swore positively that during the last week he had identified the 
two three-year-old fillies as Fisher's property at the barracks among nineteen other 
horses, and that he was positive of their identity when fifty yards away from them and 
the corral they w^ere inclosed in, although he had not seen them since 1899. 

The Crown placed Messrs. Sharpies, DeRenzie and Damon in the box, three of the 
best known horsemen in Southern Alberta. They one and all swore that with their 
experience they would not swear to the identity of a three-year-old mare if they had 
not seen it since it was a j^earling, nor did they know of any man that could. 

The Crown made out a clear case of horse-stealing against these men. The judge 
in summing up charged strongly against the prisoners. The jury brought in a verdict 
of ' not guilty '. 

This case has caused considerable interest in Southern Alberta, and the verdict was 
very unpopular. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT HO WE 45 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

In the fall of last year forty head of horses were stolen from a man named Lind- 
quist at Boundary Creek. Certain men were suspected, and warrants issued for their 
arrest, but they could not be found in Canada. Subsequently, through the instrument- 
ality of Supt. Deane, one Smith was arrested on a charge of having brought these stolen 
horses into Montana and was tried at Great Falls, and proved guilty of being an accom- 
plice in the theft and was sentenced to one year in the penitentiary. The whereabouts 
of another party cannot be ascertained. On June 22, St.-Sergt. Armer, while at Bound- 
ary' Creek, learned from a man called Fidler that the stolen horses had been driven into 
his corral the night before they were stolen, and that a man named Percy De Wolfe, well 
and unfavourably known in this district and in Montana, had evidently been the prin- 
cipal man in the theft, with two others acting with him. De Wolfe was arrested in 
Montana after some difficulty, and brought to trial at Great Falls. Supt. Deane worked 
up this case from the beginning, and the evidence he brought up at the trial was so con- 
clusive and convincing that the jury were but a very short time in pronouncing De 
Wolfe guilty. He was sentenced to 10 years in the penitentiary. This case will ha\e 
a great effect on would-be horse thieves near the boundary line. 

CATTLE AND HORSE STEALING. 

I will now venture a few remarks upon the subject of increase or decrease, during 
the past few years, of crime as it affects the stock industr^^ of this district. I have been 
carefully considering the matter and have interviewed cattle men and ranchers on the 
subject and many of them are of opinion that cattle and horse stealing is on the decrease, 
but we have had more complaints of calf 'rustling' than in former years. 

CASES OF THEFT. 

Of the 6 cases of theft wherein 3 convictions were made and 3 dismissed. The 
cases convicted were one for stealing a ring, one for stealing some clothing and one, an 
Indian, for stealing a fur coat for which he was sentenced to four months' imprisonment. 

In Rex vs Seaman, the accused was charged with forging a promissory note for 
$50 and was acquitted by Judge Scott on July 17, owing to the principal witness being 
in the United States. The same man was arrested by order of Judge Scott, on another 
charge of forgery and was again brought before him on November 13 and was released 
on bail to appear for trial when called on. 

One case of bringing stolen property into Canada that of ' Baptiste Fossenauive ' or 
' Big Tobacco ' is still sub judice. 

SUPPLYING LIQUOR TO INDIANS. 

Of the 25 cases of supplying liquor to Indians, 17 convictions were made and eight 
were dismissed on account of non credibility of Indian witnesses. It is very hard to obtain 
a conviction, as Indians will not tell where they get their liquor from. I think that drun- 
kenness among the Indians is on the increase, they have more money to spend from their 
coal and hay contracts yearly, and the young Indians who have been educated at the 
various missions and industrial schools, readily pass themselves off as half-breeds, and walk 
openly into bars and buy liquor without a question. Thevse boys in many cases are the 
means by which a number of the Indians procure their liquor. Forty-five Indians were 
convicted for drunkenness this year. 

CONVICTIONS UNDER LIQUOR LICENSE ORDINANCE. 

Of the five cases under the Liquor License Ordinance, five convictions were made, 
one against Macleod Hotel, two against two women of ill-fame at Blairmore, and two at- 
Cardston. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH HOWE, 
SwpL ComiTianding ' D ' Division. 



NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



APPENDIX D. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT C. CONSTANTINE, COMMAND- 
ING 'G' DIVISION, FORT SASKATCHEWAN, TOGETHER WITH 
REPORT OF INSPECTOR C. H. W^EST, C0M:MANDING IN THE 
PEACE RIYER SUB-DISTRICT. 

North-west Mounted Police, 

Fort Saskatchewan, December 1, 1901. 
The Commissioner, 

North-west Mounted Police, 

Regina. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the annual report of ' G ' Division for the year 
ended November 30, 1901. 

I took over command of this division from Superintendent Griesbach on February 
20 last. The district under control of this division is very large, extending from Red 
Deer River on the south to the Arctic Ocean on the north, including in that area the 
Athabasca, Peace and Mackenzie rivers, all of which are important streams with large 
tributaries. I propose dividing my report into two sections, the first dealing with the 
foreign settlements to the east and north of us, and the general police work throughout 
the district, and the second embracing the natural features of the north, modes of 
travelling and transportation, and such general information as I have gathered from 
time to time from our own people and from different parties trading in that section of 
the country. 

general state of the district, including foreign settlement. 

The district generally is in a prosperous and flourishing state, the crops on the 
whole yielding even beyond the expectations of the farmers. Owing to the increased 
area under cultivation the amount of grain raised in this district exceeds that of previous 
years. 

A special and unique feature of this district is the great variety of nation- 
alities within its boundaries. Not only is there the usual class of settler, viz., 
Canadians, English, Scotch and Irish, French both from Europe and Eastern Canada, 
and Americans, with the usual population of half-breeds, but there are also Germans, 
Russians, Scandinavians, Galicians, Austrians and Hungarians. Of several of these 
last nationalities, subdivisions might again be made on account of the difference in 
dialects. For this reason it is somewhat difficult to find an interpreter to handle the 
different cases. This special foreign element is settled for the most part east of Fort 
Saskatchewan ; the land occupied by them extends for some 100 miles on the south 
bank of the Saskatchewan River. Immediately east of the fort lies the German and 
Austrian settlements. These people have been on the land, some eight years, and are 
therefore thoroughly settled and prosperous ; they have adapted themselves to the wa^' 
of the country, and their houses differ in no way from those of the ordinary settler. 

An attempt was made this year to grow flax on a large scale by a syndicate under 
the management of a Pole in this neighbourhood. The experiment was only partially 
successful, the amount of land sown to the flax (over 300 acres) being too much for the 
limited number of men and teams to sow sufficiently early for the crop to ripen before 
the frost came early in the fall, but a very fine sample of flax was secured off the land 
which was earliest sown. The land throughout this district is, for the most part, low 
lying. The past three wet summers have accordingly made the trails very heavy for 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT CONSTANTINE 45 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

travelling, in some places they have been simply impassable. However, as the 
land lies with a marked slope towards the river Saskatchewan, and is drained by creeks 
at short intervals, the roads could be made very fair under skilled supervision. 

A Government ditch is in course of construction in the German settlement imme- 
diately east of the village : this ditch extends about three miles, and when completed 
promises to be of great benefit. Other ditches, notably one draining the land on the 
west side of BeaA^er Creek, w ould be greatly to the advantage of the settlers and others 
using the main trail. A special bad place in this trail occurs in the Moravian settle- 
ment, eighteen miles from the fort. This swamp could be drained by a ditch into the 
tw^o creeks. 

There is a small village with three stores and a licensed hotel at Star on the Beaver 
Creek. This village owes its existence to the Galician and Russian trade as those 
settlements commence at this point. During the latter part of the summer we 
established a detachment there. 

From Star, for eighty miles east, the land is mostly taken up by Russians and 
Galicians, extending twelve to fifteen miles north to the Saskatchewan River, and 
as far as twenty-five miles south to Beaver Hills Lake. Their numbers are estimated to 
be some 13,000. The pioneers among them have now been settled for five years. These 
earty settlers have made wonderful progress, and have proved themselves desirable 
colonists. Storekeepers and machine agents bear witness to their general integrity ; as a 
rule they pay cash for everything they buy, but when given credit, they very seldom 
make any delay in settling up. As evidence of their industry and progressiveness, I 
may instance the case of William Poulshie, one of the earlier comers, who with his son, 
took off this year a crop of 180 acres, 120 of which was excellent wheat. The majority 
of them sow a few acres of rye, from which they make bread for their own consumption. 
Rye grows luxuriantly (the straw attaining the length of 6 ft.) and moreover being very 
hardy, they thus insure for themselves a sufficient supply of breadstuff for the winter. 
The straw is used for thatching their houses, which are built very warm, and in the 
majority of cases kept very clean. To this cleanliness may be attributed their immunity 
from c'ontagious diseases, and consetjuently their low death rate. 

The total record of deaths registrated for the past year amounted only to twenty- 
four, less than two per thousand. During the year the number of births registered was 
216. 

Among local industries might l^e mentioned a brick kiln, which turns out a very 
serviceable, if somewhat unwieldy, brick two feet by two feet six inches thick, and a 
grist mill at Wostock, about twelve miles from Star, which is operated by a home-made 
wind fan. 

Religion is a very real thing to the Galician, and on this matter he feels very 
strongly. A religious question of some importance came up during the spring, 
threatening for some time to cause a serious disturbance. Prompt measures were 
however taken to prevent trouble. In order to understand the nature of this trouble 
and the various issues involved, it is necessary to know something of the different 
creeds of these Russians and Galicians. The settlers in this district may be roughly 
divided into three parties, in accordance with their religious tenets : first, Roman Catho- 
lics, comprising those Russians, Poles and Galicians who acknowledge the Pope of Rome 
as their spiritual head, and conform altogether to the Roman doctrine and ritual. 
The second party, the Orthodox or Russian Church, repudiates the claims of the 
Pope of Rome and have their own doctrine and ritual. The third party is known 
as the Greek Catholic, or Uniate Church. This party occupies a position midway be- 
tween the other two, inasmuch as, while they acknowledge the Pope of Rome as their 
head, they use a ritual of their own, and many differences of doctrine exist. Thus their 
priests are allowed to marry. All these three parties are represented in this district, 
and the trouble arose in this way. The third party or Greek Uniates built a church 
and clergyhouse, but had no priest of their own. Some of them, including the two 
trustees in whose names the church property was held, invited Father Korchainski, of 
the Russian Orthodox party (No. 2) to minister to them. The majority of them, how- 
ever, preferred to ask Father Zaclinski, of the Roman Catholic party, to be their priest. 



46 NOR I H- WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Then both priests laid claim to the building and property. Party feeling ran high and 
threats were uttered on both sides. The matter came to a head on Easter day, when 
both priests came to hold service in the church, each attended by more than 200 sup- 
porters. I had despatched a sergeant and two men with orders to prevent a breach of 
the peace. The church is situated four miles from Star, where there is a telegraph 
office. As there was no possibility of bringing the rival parties to an agreement, the 
church door was locked and the priests were directed to retire with their respective 
congregations on either side of the building, where services were conducted by each of 
them quietly and without molestation. So passed off what at one time threatened to be 
a, serious trouble, particularly when the excitable temperament of the Galician, coupled 
with his strongly seated sense of religion, is taken into consideration. 

The dispute concerning the ownership of the church has been taken into court for 
settlement, and is still undecided. From my observation of these people I should judge 
that those professing the Orthodox or Russian faith are the most intelligent and pro- 
gressive. The people of this creed have erected no less than three churches of their 
own, the one at Wostock, thirty-five miles from here, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, 
with accommodation for 800 worshippers, being a very fine building. The trustee of 
this church, Fetha Mamerski, is also postmaster at Wostock, in which capacity he gives 
good satisfaction. Two of these churches are built by little Russians, the third by 
colonists from Bokovina and Herzgovina. 

They are all three under the charge of Rev. J. Korchainski, who was formerly 
Russian missionary in the Yukon. The three buildings were consecrated on the 8th of 
last September by Rt. Rev. Bishop Tikhore, Metropolitan of North America. I was 
informed by the interpreter that the bishop, in his addresses, reminded his people that 
they were now British subjects, and specially enjoined upon them the duty of conform- 
ing in all ways to the laws of the country. And it is greatly to their credit that com- 
ing from the much harder circumstances and severer rule of their own countries, 
they have not more frequently come into collision with our own laws. Of course, under 
their new and unfamiliar conditions, a simple uneducated race needs careful watching 
a-nd judicious handling. But in this, as in other matters, they seem to show a laudable 
desire to learn as much as they can, and to fit themselves as well as they are able, for 
their new duties as colonists. They are industrious workers both for themselves, and as 
hired servants. The young girls make excellent domestics with a little training. 

On the whole, therefore, my observation leads me to believe that the Russian and 
Oalician immigration has brought a very desirable class of settler to the North- west, 
and one which will, in a short time, be of material assistance to the productiveness and 
prosperity of the Dominion. 

ASSISTANCE TO INDIAN AND OTHER DEPARTMENTS. 

During the past season, as heretofore, every assistance has been rendered to other 
departments and transport placed at the disposal of their representatives whenever it 
was required. 

The treaty payments were attended by escorts and every possible help given to the 
Indian Department in making the payments. In connection with the latter, it should 
be said that the various trips were very hard owing to the state of the trails. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT CONSTANTINE 47 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

DISTRIBUTION STATE— 'G' DIVISION. 

Fort Saskatchewan, November 30, 1901. 





1 

s 
S 

a 

zn 


t 

h-l 


1 

zn 


i 


1 


1 


1 

02 


H 


Remarks, 


Horses. 




Station. 




13 


i 

1 


1 


¥ort Saskatchewan. . 
A th al^asoa Tjan f1 • ti sTii 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 
1 


21 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 

41 


2 
"2' 

"i 

1 
1 

7 


• 
3(» 
2 
1 
1 
1 
8 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
6 
3 
3 

62 


. 


11 


13 


10 


34 


:Star 














1 
1 


i 

■3' 
4 


1 


Whitford 












1 


Lac la Biche 












1 


Kdmonton 




1 




1 


"l" 






4 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 


9 


St. Albert . , . 




1 


Wetaskiwin 


Calgary & Edni. Relief Det. 
II II . . 




2 


Lacombe 










1 


Ponoka 












1 














1 


Tjesser Slave Lake 




1 




1 

1 




Spl. Const. Interpreter . . . 




8 


Peace River Landing 
Fort Chipewyan 








4 










Total 


1 


3 


3 


4 


3 




16 


25 


18 


59 



48 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
Summary of Cases in Fort Saskatchewan District from Dec. 1, 1900, to Nov. 30, 1901. 



Crime. 



Crimes 
entered. 



Offences against the person — 

Murder 

Assault 

Rape 

Seduction 

Assault aggravated 

Shooting and wounding 

Offences against property — 

Theft... 

Horse stealing 

Burglary ." . 

Miscellaneous . 

Killing cattle and horses.. 

Catile stealing 

False pretenses 

Forgery 

Fraud 

Arson 

Damaging property 

Offences against public order — 

Carrying concealed weapons 

Contempt of court 

Carrying loaded firearms 

Offences against the Customs Act — 

Evasion of customs 

Offences against religion and morals- 
Vagrancy 

Drunk and disorderly and creating disturbance. 

Inmate of house of ill-fame 

Keeper of house of ill-fame 

Insulting language 

Using threatening language 

X^nnatural offence 

Attempting to procure defilement of women. . . 
Offences against Indian Act — 

Supplying liquor to Indians 

Desertion from Indian schools ...... 

Drunk on Re.serve 

Misleading justice- 
Perjury ........... ... 

Corruption and disobedience— 

Obstructing police officer 

Offences against N. W. T. Ordinances- 
Master and servants 

Quarantine and Herd Act . . 

Game ordinance 

Sunday observance 

Prairie fires 

Liquor ordinance 

Insanity 

Illegally practicing medicine 

Breaking jail 



Total 



1 
41 

1 
2 
2 
2 

47 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 

13 
2 
5 
1 

16 

1 
1 
5 



276 



Con- 
victions. 



17 



135 






g^O- 



Remarks. 



24 

"2 
"1* 
33 

1' 

1 



2 


1 


54 


6 


2 




1 
1 




1 





1 




1 


4 






122 



awaiting trial, 
awaiting trial, 
awaiting trial. 

10 awaiting trial. 



2 awaiting trial.. 



awaiting triaL 



The attached list comprises all complaints of offences which have arisen within the 
district during the year. 

There are three cases coming under this head which I would allude to briefly, as 
follows : — 

On Sunday, June 9, C. T. Phillips, of Battle Lake, reported to the Wetaskiwin de- 
tachment that a body had been discovered that day by one F. J. Bullock on his 
(Phillips') land. The coroner from Lacombe, Dr. Sharpe, held an inquest on June 1 1 
and returned a verdict that the deceased, unknown, came to his death at an unknown 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT GONSTANTINE 49 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

date. (Since ascertained that the crime was committed on April 21 last.) In August 
the remains were positively identified by James Smith, of Kalamazoo, Mich., as those of 
his stepson, Leon W. Stainton. Suspicious circumstances pointed strongly towards 
Charles B. BuWock, alias 'Bud Bullock,' and Corporal Hetherington was placed in 
charge of the case. After three months searching, Bullock was arrested by Corporal 
Hetherington, at Great Falls, Mont., on November 22. Bullock waived extradition and 
is on his way to Canada. 

In October, two half-breed prisoners were brought in by Sergeant Anderson and 
Constable Riddoch, from Fort Vermilion, 700 miles north of here, and which necessi- 
tated 1,100 miles travelling by land and water. Both prisoners were committed for 
trial by Mr. Wilson, J. P., Vermilion, one on a charge of ' carnally knowing a girl under 
14 years,' and the other for 'incest.' One of the prisoners was captured by Sgt. Ander- 
son just as he was about to leave for the mountains during a snow storm in September. 

The Strathcona post office was broken into during September and $800 stolen. It 
appears the postmaster left the previous evening taking a large sum of money home with 
him as there was no safe in the office. The smaller amount of $800 w^as left in the 
office. It transpired that the back door had been forced. The lock, however, was a 
simple one. Up to the present the mystery has not been solved. 

I would here draw attention to the length of time, in many instances, that com- 
mitted prisoners have to wait trial, sometimes for several months. It is unfair to the 
prisoner, and is also an inconvenience to us, inasmuch as we cannot put him at labour 
and we cannot affi)rd the men to parade prisoners around for exercise. 

DISCIPLINE AND CONDUCT. 

With perhaps two exceptions, the discipline and conduct of the division during the 
past year has been good. 

FUR. 

Fur this year has been plentiful, and the returns show $596,000 worth purchased in 
Edmonton by the various merchants, viz.: McDougall & Secord, Coaskie, Hudson's Bay 
Co., Larue & Picard and Ross Bros. 

DRILL AND TARGET PRACTICE. 

During the summer and early autumn the command was put through a regular 
course of spring drill and the usual weekly parades were held, but owing to the pressure 
of Avork and the greatly reduced strength effective work could not be done. 

During the two weeks prior to the departure of the party for Calgary in connection 
with the Royal visit, they were put through a thorough course of mounted drill. 

All ranks have gone through the preliminary practice with the carbine and also the 
revolver annual practice. 

CLOTHING AND KIT. 

The quality generally has been good. I regret to say, however, that the supply of 
some articles has not been up to the demand. 

HORSES. 

The horses under my command are in good health and condition. I regret to have 
to report the death of two horses (1853 and 1854) and a pony (200) at Lesser Slave 
Lake. Seven horses were cast and sold, being unfit for further service. 

Thirteen remounts were received from Calgary and two were purchased locally 
during the past summer. They turned out well. 
28—4 



50 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

FIRE PROTECTION. 

We have a fire engine with all necessaiy hose appliances in close proximity to 
all buildings except the hospital. A tank which holds 2,500 gallons of water is situated 
under the engine house. The necessary precautions are taken against fire, the buildings 
all being supplied with babcocks, fire buckets, etc. 

ARMS. 

The arms are in good order and repair, but obsolete. In my opinion, we, as a 
permanent corps, should be furnished with more modern weapons. 

HARNESS AND SADDLERY. 

The harness and saddlery are in fair condition and good repair. We require a 
few sets of new harness and they have been requisitioned for. 

TRANSPORT. 

The transport is in good order and repair. Our summer transport was re-painted 
Khaki colour according to regulation. A few jumpers are required for railway detach- 
ments, as well as some of the Eastern Detachments. They have been asked for. 

FORAGE. 

Ko contract has been let yet for oats for Fort Saskatchewan and Edmonton, they 
are being purchased locally. The hay is of good quality. 

TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE LINES. 

The C.P.R. have brought their telegraph line across from Strathcona to Edmonton, 
via the Hudson's Bay Fort. There is also a telephone communication between St. 
Albert and Edmonton, Strathcona and Edmonton, and Edmonton and Moranville. 

A telegraph office has been established at Star, 25 miles east of here, and is found 
very beneficial to settlers, as well as to ourselves. 

RAILWAYS. 

At present there is only one railway in my district, the Calgary and Edmonton, a 
branch of the C.P.R. Great improvements have been made on this line during the 
year, on which there is a daily service at present, with the exception of Sundays. The 
railway construction between North and South Edmonton is progressing, and at the 
present time employment is given to about 125 men and 20 teams. 

EXPORTS. 

From information gathered the following is a list of exports during the year from 
this district : — 

Oats 6,060,549 lbs. 

Wheat 178,610 " 

Barley 7,143 " 

Potatoes 238,600 " 

Flour 996,517 " 

Hogs 144,075 " live weight. 

Horses 104 

Cattle 60 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT CONSTANTINE 51 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

QUARANTINE. 

During the year small-pox prevailed to a large extent all over this district. Pest 
houses were established in the Edmonton district to which a good many patients were 
moved. The district was thoroughly patrolled, and rations, (fee, forwarded to the suf- 
ferers when necessary. I^o outbreak of small-pox occurred in the foreign settlements, 
their immunity therefrom being, in my opinion, accounted for by their being vaccinated 
before being allowed to land in this country. 

INDIANS. 

The conduct of the Indians in this district has been good, no crimes of a serious 
nature having been brought to my notice. 

LANDS AND HOMESTEADS. 

Lands sold by railway and other companies amount to 375,270 acres. The land 
office returns to October 1 of this year, show that 1,383 homesteads have been entered, 
embracing 242,280 acres, bringing the total acreage taken up this year to 617,550 acres. 

CREAMERIES. 

The creamery industry has been very successful this year, and the outlook most 



GAME. 

Ducks, geese, prairie chicken and partridge have been plentiful during the 
season. 

Coyotes have been very troublesome this year, and apparently are getting more 
numerous. They have done a great deal of mischief among poultry and young animals. 

DREDGING INDUSTRY. 

I learn from the different banks that gold has been deposited to the extent of 
84,266, taken from the river Saskatchewan by miners working independently of the 
Dredge Co. 

The Alberta Gold Dredging Co. Syndicate has had three dredges at work at 
various points on the river during the summer, the yield of gold being only $6,000. 
This is accounted for by the machinery getting out of repair frequently, and the dredges 
obliged to stop work in consequence, everything is expected, however, to be in good 
shape for next year, and the yield greater. 



PRAIRIE FIRES. 



With the exception of one in the neighbourhood of Lacombe, said to have done 
considerable damage, there have been practically no prairie fires this year. 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 



Good work has been done by the North-west government this year, upwards of 
84,000 has been spent on drainage between Moranville and St. Albert, and two new 
bridges erected on the Sturgeon River, $2,000 has been expended on the base line west 
28—41 



52 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

of Edmonton to Stony Plain, and }?1,200 on the one east of Edmonton tlirough tlie 
Clover Bar district. New bridges have been erected over the White Mud River, Clear- 
water Creek, and a number of minor improvements carried out there. 

A new road has been opened from Beaver Lake to Cooking Lake, and on to Strath- 
cona. The trail going from Edmonton to Athabasca Landing has been graded and 
generally improved at an outlay of 81,500. 

A government ditch is in course of construction in the German settlement east of 
here. It extends some three miles, and when completed promises to be a great benefits 

LIQUOR LAWS. 

Infraction of the law in this regard has been dealt with, and the offenders punislied. 

SETTLEMENT AND AGRICULTURE. 

Immigration this year has been large, as shown by the following figures : — 

English 413 

Scotch 520 

Irish 270 

Germans from Austria and Russia 1,000 

Scandinavians 1,734 

Belgians 146 

French 42 

Galicians , 800 

From IT.S.A 4,289 

Canadians ■ 1,840 

Other countries 260 

Total 11,314 

Effects brought into the country by these people through Calgary and Edmonton 
amount in value to $274,176. 

As an example of the improved condition of farmers, and the large area of land 
under cultivation, I am in a position to state that implements to the value of 8143,000 
have been purchased in this district. 

BARRACKS. 

A number of young poplar, cottonwood and spruce trees were planted round the 
square last spring. The experiment so far has been a success, the spruce trees especially 
thriving. 

The hospital building requires repairs generally, and a lean-to kitcken thereto would 
be a great advantage. 

I have frequently drawn attention to the fact that a new guard room is an absolute 
necessity, the accommodation, and the building generally is altogether inadequate and 
unsuitable for our requirements. 

A good well with a force pump and windmill would be a great boon here. At 
present the water for cooking and drinking is taken from the river, and it is hardh^ fit 
for consumption as it contains so much refuse. A man and horse are continually em- 
ployed hauling it. If a well was sunk, it would also be invaluable in case of fire. 

LIBRARY AND AMUSEMENTS. 

A library has lately been started here and is a source of much pleasure and advan- 
tage to all the members of the division. It is kept up by voluntary monthly subscrip- 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT CONST ANTINE 53 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

tions, and you have kindly recommended a grant from the fine fund towards it. The 
library is managed by a committee, and every one has the opportunity offered to 
submit the names of books desired to be purchased. It opened with a stock of eighty 
volumes. 

The billiard table was lately repaired and renovated, and it also is a great benefit 
to the men. 

THE NORTHERN COUNTRY. 

Athabasca Landing, which is ninety-six miles from Fort Saskatchewan, is the great 
shipping depot for all goods tire, imported for trade into the northern country, both by 
the Hudson's Bay Co., and free traders. Navigation opens generally about May 1, and 
remains open until about the end of October. The river from the Athabasca Landing 
to the Grand Rapids, a distance of 165 miles is very shallow in places, and is plentifully 
sprinkled with large boulders. At Grand Rapids all the freight for the North is tran- 
shipped. A large number of half-breeds and Indians are employed at this work as 
guides and steersmen, by the company and traders. The Grand Rapids are the 
principal rapids on this river, and have a fall of about 85 feet from what is called the 
old Police shack to the eddy, a distance of three quarters of a mile, and the river at this 
point is full of boulders. The head of the rapids is divided into two channels by a small 
island ; the right hand channel, going down stream, being the one used for the lowering 
of scows. Strangers without guides are very apt to take the left channel, as up to the 
head of the rapids it is comparatively free from boulders especially in high water. The 
freight brought down to this point by boats is unloaded and taken across to the lower 
end of the island on a tram car, the scows and boats are then lowered down the right 
hand channel with ropes, and receive their cargoes again at the end of the island. 
Free traders and others, who bring their goods from the Athabaska Landing in scows, 
unload about half the freight near the Police shack and run their scows to the head of 
the island with the remaining quantity, poling and tracking back for the other half. 
Below the head of the rapids the river can be navigated with loaded boats, provided one 
secures the services of an experienced guide, as there are several difficult rapids between 
the head of the rapids and Fort McMurray, especially when the water is low. ' Big ' 
and ' Little ' cascades being about '26 miles above McMurray. At this point there is a 
ledge of stone across the river causing a drop of about 4 feet. On both sides of the 
river abo\e and below the cascades is found a ledge of limestone from 4 to 8 feet thick. 
The river banks between the Grand Rapids and McMurray, rise in places about 500 feet, 
and are fairly well covered with spruce, poplar, and in many places, birch. From Grand 
Rapids to McMurray, a distance of about 85 miles, can be run in 2 days providing 
there is a good stage of water and no accidents. 

Fort McMurray, at the junction of the Clearwater and Athabasca rivers, is a place 
of decidedly decayed grandeur. At one time it was quite an important place, but now 
only a few half-breeds and Indians are left to mark its former significance, and the 
Hudson's Bay Co., have moved their trading post about 35 miles down the river to a 
place formerly called Little Red River, but now designated Fort McKay. McMurray 
during the summer months is a fairly busy place, owing to the transhipment of the 
freight brought down the rapids in scows to the steamer Grahame. The fish supply for 
this post is procured from Fish Lake, 75 miles east, the nearest lake to McMurray. 
The site of the old Hudson's Bay Co.'s post is near the river bank, it was established 
by Mr. Moberly some 35 years ago. 

The Clearwater River is about 100 yards wide at it's mouth with steep banks. It 
is said that there is a bench between this point and Grand Rapids, which is fairly level 
with a summer horse trail. 

At Fort McKay, 35 miles below, there is a small H. B. Co., trading post; with a 
young half-breed named Thos. Clarke in charge, and on the opposite side of the river is 
a small settlement of Indians, mixed Crees and Chipewyan. 

The distance from Fort MciVIurray to Fort Chipewyan by the summer route is 185 
miles ; the river in width between these points averages from four to five hundred 



54 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD Vll.j^ A. 1902 

yards, and will float a boat drawing from two to three feet of water. The banks of the 
river from McMurray to Chipewyan are not so high as above the former place, they are 
thickly covered with spruce and poplar of fair size. There are numerous small islands 
in the river betw^een these points. Fort Chipewyan is by far the most central post in the 
north, to the east is Fon du Lac, to the west the Peace River Forts, and from the north 
and its settlements it is easily accessible both in the summer and winter. This point 
is the most likely place for the headquarters for the police ; having been for a long 
time the principal post of the Hudson's Bay Co. in the north. There is a much larger 
population here than elsewhere, and it may be added that much of it is of 
decidedly unsavoury reputation, which might give additional weight for the police 
location. 

Fort Chipewyan is pleasantly situated at the west end of Lake Athabasca. The 
buildings at the fort are of a substantial character, built of squared logs, two-storied, 
and present a neat appearance. Outside the fort there are a number of small log build- 
ings occupied by the employees of the company — 'free men' — as they call themselves. 
The population is twenty w^hites and 150 half-breeds. Very few Indians reside at 
this post, although it is the trading point for several hundred who visit it two 
or three times during the year. Besides the Hudson's Bay Co. there are two other 
trading posts, that of Colin Fraser and Peter Loutit. The Churches of England and 
Rome both have missions, the former in charge of the Rev. A. J. Warwick, and the 
latter the Rev. Father DeSaul, assisted by three other priests and four or five lay 
brothers. Attached to the Roman Catholic mission is a convent of the Grey Nuns. 
There are upwards of 100 Indian children attending the mission schools. The mission 
possesses a saw-mill and a small steamboat for conveying supplies to the other missions, 
the latter being found necessary on account of the freight rate. The greater part of the 
population at Fort Chipewyan belongs to the Roman Catholic Church. 

The catch of fish, w^hicli is the principal article of diet, is usually plentiful, but the 
sj^stem of catching and storing them is very much behind the times. Little attention 
is paid to the laying in of a supply of smoked or otherwise cured fish, although salt in 
abundance can easily be procured from Salt River, near Fort Smith. Potatoes and 
other vegetables and barley, do well at Fort Chipewyan, and a plentiful supply of hay 
can be obtained from sloughs in the neighbourhood. 

The steamer Grahame, 140 feet long by 28 feet beam, a stern wheeler, and capable 
of carrying 150 tons of freight, owned by the Hudson's Bay Co., makes this her head- 
quarters, and runs from Fort McMurray to Smith's Landing, on the Great Slave River. 
The Roman Catholic mission consumes about 25,000 fish between the beginning of 
November and the end of April, which are caught in Lake Athabasca. Lake Atha- 
basca is about 185 miles long, w^ith an average width of thirty miles, the shores are 
principally rocky with background wooded with spruce, poplar and jackpine. In the 
lake excellent whitefish are caught both in the fall and in the winter under the ice. 
Smith's Landing, which is at the head of the sixteen-mile portage, consists of about ten 
families of Indians and Half-breeds mixed, who live by hunting, fishing and trapping 
during the winter, and in summer are employed in the transporting of the freight for 
the Hudson's Bay Co. and the traders over the portage to Fort Smith. The portage is 
through bush and a fair cart trail has been made. This is the centre of the buffklo 
country. There are four minor trading posts in this vicinity, and the Indians known as 
the 'Caribou Eaters' trade there. 

Fort Smith is a shipping point for the Great Slave Lake and the McKenzie River. 
The Hudson's Bay Co. steamer Wrigley, a screw steamer, 80 feet keel, 20 feet beam, 
drawing six feet of water, plies between Fort Smith and McPherson and Peel River. 
The Hudson's Bay Co. own a telephone line between Smith Landing and Fort Smith. 
The distance from Fort Chipewyan to Fort Smith is 106 miles. 

There are numerous small lakes in the neighbourhood of Fort Smith, well stocked 
with fish. Moose and caribou also abound here. The supply of salt for the district is 
gathered on the banks of the Salt River, twenty miles down from the fort, where beds 
are formed by natural evaporation. The w^ood buffalo make this point the middle of 
their range, probably on account of the salt. One band ranging from Peace Point, on 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT CONSTANTINE 55 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

the Peace River, to Salt River ; the other band from the latter place to about twenty- 
five miles of the Great Slave River. The bands are said to keep separate and never 
cross the Salt River. Leaving Fort Smith and travelling down the river for about 185 
miles brings one to Fort Resolution on the Great Slave Lake. This lake, if it was not 
for some islands seen in the distance, could be taken for a vast sea. It is in length 
about 500 miles and about 200 in width, and very deep. ISTagle and Hyslop, who 
receive their supplies from McDougall & Secord, of Edmonton, own and operate a steam- 
boat which plies between Fort Smith and Fort Good Hope, on the Mackenzie River. 
It is a twin-screw steamer of sixty horse power, 60-foot keel and 12-foot beam. The 
R. C. mission have also a steamer of about the same dimensions plying between the same 
points. This may be called the land of plenty as regards fish and meat. The caribou 
were reported numerous last year ; the lake trout are of great size and plentiful. Dog 
Ribs, Yellow Knives and Slavey Indians, who are members of Treaty No. 8, trade at 
Fort Resolution. Navigation on the lake generally opens about June 23 and closes 
about the end of October. From information received it would appear that the w^halers, 
mostly American, who traded with the Eskimos and other northern Indians along the 
Mackenzie River and the Arctic Coast, and are said to have wintered in Mackenzie Bay 
and Richards Island deal principally in liquor, no duty being paid on goods or liquor. 
It is also reported that drunken sailors debauch the women and frequently commit other 
acts of depredation. Poison is also said to be extensively used in that section of the 
country. 

The river from Smith to Resolution is splendid for steamboat navigation ; it is deep, 
without rocks or any other obstacle of any kind. The banks are not quite so high as 
further up the river, and are thickly timbered with spruce and pine of good size. 

From Great Slave Lake fai'tlier north very little can be said owing to its being at 
the present time beyond the pale of police jurisdiction, but, from what can be gathered, 
the country in general is very similar to that already described in this report. The 
Mackenzie, from Great Slave Lake to the Arctic, averages between two and three miles 
in width ; very deep with a strong current. Vegetables, such as potatoes, and barley, 
are grown as far north as Good Hope. The buffalo are increasing rapidly, their chief 
enemy being the wolves, who attack the young before they are strong enough to offer 
resistance. Only for this they would be much more numerous. 

In referring to the steamer Grahame, I omitted to say that in addition to running 
between Fort McMurray and Fort Smith, it also plies occasionally from Fort Chipewyan 
to Red River Post, a small trading post of the H. B. Co. at the mouth of Red River, just 
below the shoots on the Peace River, a distance of about 240 miles. Leaving the str. 
Grahame below the shoots, and taking the sturgeon head boats from there, brings you to 
Fort Vermilion, a distance of 60 miles. Vermilion is a large trading section, where the 
H. B. Co. do a large business, together with other traders. It is a trading centre for 
Cree and Beaver Indians, and there ai-e also several prosperous farms, owned by whites 
and half-breeds, on which several thousand bushels of wheat were raised last year, but 
unfortunately were touched by the early frost. This country is wonderfully well adapted 
for farming, the soil being very rich, and its resources great if only developed. Fourteen 
days journey as a rule, will bring one by boat from Vermilion to Peace River Crossing, 
a distance of 300 miles up stream, into the newly established Peace River sub-district. 
This sub-district was established during the present year, and is under the command of 
Inspector West, who went there in February. His headquarters are at Lesser Slave 
Lake. Fort Chipewyan is also under his supervision, where one N.C.O., one constable 
and an interpreter are stationed. At Lesser Slave Lake the detachment consists of one 
N.C.O., two constables and one interpreter and three pack ponies, and that at Peace River 
Crossing comprises one N. CO. one constable and interpreter. There is also an outpost 
at Sturgeon Lake where a constable is stationed.. Since the establishment of this dis- 
trict by the police in February, drinking and illicit whiskey dealings have greatly 
diminished, and law and order prevails to a greater extent than heretofore. Up to August 
of this year permits were not granted to any one at Lesser Slave Lake, owing to the 
reported abuse of the privilege ; since then, however, the issuing of permits has com- 
menced, and several of 5 gallons each have been granted to traders and others, but so 



56 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

far, no irregularities in connection therewith have l^een brought to my notice. In my 
opinion, nevertheless, such large quantities should not be granted to any one person at 
a time, and I would suggest a limit of, say, two gallons be adopted until such time as the 
country is better policed. The Indians generally are well behaved in this part, and are 
prospering. I may sa}^ that since treaty payments, a few isolated cases have arisen 
necessitating the issue of temporary relief. Two Indian reserves have been surveyed 
during the j^ear at Lesser Slave Lake, for the use of Cinaysayo's band, one is located at 
Drift Pile River, and the other at Sucker Creek. 

Lesser Slave Lake is a very fine body of water 80 miles long, with an average w^idth 
of 15 miles and navigable at all places. The settlement j^roper of the lake commences at 
Stony Point, adjacent to a small river which connects Buffalo Lake with Lesser Slave 
Lake. Passing up the river, Buffalo Lake is reached, where tons upon tons of hay is 
gathered every year. On both sides of this lake the settlement is established, and 
extends to a distance of 10 miles towards Sturgeon Lake. The Catholic and Anglican 
denominations have missions here, and about 125 children attend the schools of the 
missions. 

Proceeding north overland to Peace River Crossing, a distance of 90 miles, no 
settlers are seen until within 30 miles of Peace River, when the country becomes open, 
and fitted for ranching operations, in consequence of which a few ranchers are met with 
who ranch on a small scale. 

As it would take a good size volume to deal thoroughly with the northern country, 
moreover reports have been submitted to you from time to time dealing w ith all the 
features of the north, I would beg to conclude my report of this particular connection with 
the following observations and suggestions. In my opinion the time is rapidly approach- 
ing when the north should be more closely looked after, and the number of men and 
stations increased, and facilities for better communication improved. With the railroad 
approaching this point, and the available land taken up by new settlers, fresh fields will 
be sought after, which will naturally lead towards the country north of here, where 
thousands of acres of fertile land is awaiting the advent of the agriculturist. 

The existing conditions in the north are somewhat similar to those formerly preval- 
ent in our organized portions of the territories, means of communication are hard, mail 
service being almost unknown, except for the Hudson Bay Co., who now, as in the early 
days, carry the packet to and from the north, two or three times at the outside during 
the year. As is generally known b\^ those who have travelled through the unorganized 
parts of the territories, vast stretches of good land can be found at such places as Grand 
Prairie,^Vermilion, Lesser Slave Lake, and other places along the Peace River and right 
down to Lake Athabasca, where the banks are low% and the soil adapted for the growth 
of almost anything. Lack of regular mail service and the many ditiiculties attending 
transportation, together with the lack of police protection,"*hinders in a great measure, 
the settlement of the country. By having police at all points likely to be settled, and 
possible commercial centres, a step in the right direction will have been made foi:. the 
ad%'ancement of the country. 

I have already advocated the establishment of a division in the northern country, 
with its headquarters at Fort Chipewj^an, being the most suitable and central point. 
In the event of such a move being made, steamers would become necessary in order to 
carry on sufficient patrols along the many lakes and rivers. For instance, a small 
steamer drawing about 16 inches of water and of about ten tons burden, would be in- 
valuable for useon Lesser Slave Lake, as a steamer of thatdraught could navigate the waters 
between Athabasca Landing and Lesser Slave Lake. Another one of the same description 
would also be necessary on Peace River, plying between the shoots on the Peace to Fort 
St. John, or beyond if required. Then again, should we extend our attentions to the 
Great Slave lake and Mackenzie and Arctic districts, in connection with the Esquimos 
and Indians, a steamer of at least 50 tons burden, of the ocean going type, drawing 
between 5 and 6 feet of water, would have to be put on below Fort Smith portage, 
especially if Herschell Island was to be visited, and also other points in Canadian terri- 
tory, frequented by the American whalers. 



EEPORT OF SUPERINTENDEST CONSTANTINE 57 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

The stretch of navigable water between Fort Smith Portage and the shoots on the 
Peace, as well as Fort Chipewyan, McMurray and Fon du Lac on Lake Athabasca, 
would require a steamer of the same type as the one on the Peace River, with the excep- 
tion that this one should be a side wheeler. Those steamers would, of course, be under 
our own control, and would be invaluable, not only for patrolling the country, but also 
for carrying supplies for police stations which might be established along the water 
routes. 

The distance from Fort Saskatchewan to'our northern posts is too great for effective 
service, and our operations could be conducted with greater advantage, from a central 
point like Chipewyan. 

I forward, herewith the annual report of Inspector West. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

C. CONSTANTINE, 

Supt., Commd'g ' G ' Divn. 



58 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR C. H. WEST, COMMANDING PEACE RIVER 

SUB-DISTRICT. 

Lesser Slave Lake, November, 25, 1901. 
The Officer Commanding- 
North-west Mounted PoHce, 

Fort Saskatchewan. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my report of the Peace River sub-district from 
the time of taking over the command, viz., Feb. 14, to present date. 

Since my arrival here I have visited the following places, Sturgeon Lake twice, 
Peace River Crossing twice, Vermilion, Red River, Ft. Chipewyan, Smith's Landing, 
Fort McMurray, Wabiscow and Whitefish Lake, covering a distance of nearly 3,000 
miles, 300 miles being upon Hudson's Bay Co.'s steamer Grahame, and the remainder in 
canoe, boats of various descriptions, raft, wagon and saddle. 

I should say the general state of the district has been prosperous. There have been 
three survey parties here most of the summer, two working in the immediate vicinity 
and the third on the Peace River, viz. : Mr. Fairchild and party, and Mr. Eraser and a 
party have been at work on the Peace River road since August last. This has been the 
means of bringing a little cash into circulation and has given work to several Indians 
and half-breeds. There have been a few cases where relief was absolutely necessary, but 
it has been among very old Indians, who are unable to work for themselves and whose 
sons and daughters have married and left, or a few who were too ill to work for them- 
selves and with no one to work for them. These were all cases that would probably 
have perished of starvation had not relief been given. 

The fur catch last winter was small compared to former years, but it is the general 
opinion that this winter it will be especially good. We have already had lots of snow and 
the Indians by seeing the tracks of fur bearing animals are able to judge pretty well the 
prospects of a good or bad winter's hunt. No doubt fur is not "generally as plentiful as 
it was years ago, the reason being that Indians having a certain tract of country to 
hunt over, in due course of time it naturally becomes hunted out. This is especially the 
case with beaver, where the Crees are hunting them. These Indians kill everything in 
sight, whereas the Beaver Indians never kill a houseful of beaver, they always leave the 
young ones. When the fur becomes scarce, they strike out for some other hunting 
ground and the former tract is not hunted for years. Up to a few years ago there were 
two traders at the mouth of the Battle River on the Peace, then it became hunted out 
and has been deserted by hunters and traders until now, when the Hudsons' Bay Co. 
and Messrs. Bredin & Cornwall have sent traders there and several families from here 
and the Grand Prairie have gone in to hunt, everything being indicative of a good 
season. 

Already a large quantity of prime fur has been traded, bear, lynx, mink, marten 
and foxes, the prices being about the same as last year and the competition is about as 
keen as it can be. A few years ago, before the traders came into the country, at any 
rate before they were as numerous as the}^ are now, the competition was practically nil 
and the Indians would bring the fur to the trader, nowadays the moment the traders 
hear of an Indian or half-breed having fur, they vie with one another to get there first 
and the Indians are not to be inveigled into selling under market price. I am told on 
good authority that the quantity of fur marketed is about 50 per cent less than it was 
twenty years ago, but that it is not altogether due to the decrease of fur-bearing animals. 
An Indian gets such a good price for fur to-day compared to what he did years ago that 
he has not the same incentive to hunt that he had formerly. Twenty years ago a man 
had to kill 20 silver foxes to buy a gun valued at 80 skins (50 cents per skin), to-day he 
can buy five of the same kind of guns for one silver fox. As the price of fur is now, an 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR WEST 59 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Indian only has to kill a few bear, marten and lynx and he has sufficient to provide him- 
self with clothes, tobacco, tea and ammunition for a year. Prime bear are worth from 
15 to 25 dollars, marten 3 dollars and large lynx 3 dollars. Outside of these things his 
living costs him practically nothing. Flour is a luxury with them and they buy it when 
they can, but they get on very well without it, in fact are in much better health when 
they stick to their fish and dried meat. If they would only cook the flour it would be all 
right, but they mix a little flour and water together, half cook it in front of a fire and 
eat it in this doughy condition. After the spring hunt is over they camp round the 
lakes where they have all the fish they can eat, what they don't eat they dry and smoke. 
As soon as they have suflicient to keep them going for a time they strike off to the bush 
after moose and bear. Moose have been very plentiful this year. One man killed 30 
within 20 miles of Fort St. Johns, and I camped with a family of Indians on the Peace 
River who had any quantity of dried meat and 3 or 4 freshly killed animals, and one has 
only to see the moose skins in the traders stores at different posts to convince oneself of 
the large number killed. The number of moose and deer killed in the winter depends 
very much upon the depth of snow. If it is deep the Indians get after them on snow- 
shoes and kill large numbers, otherwise the number killed is small. In the fall of the 
year most of them have sufficient dried meat to last them for a while, others have more 
than they actually require and sell it at the stores for 7 to 8 cents per pound, they then 
come back to the lakes and as soon as it is cold enough they catch sufficient fish to do 
themselves and their dogs for the winter. They hang the fish on sticks, 10 fish to the 
stick and build small log huts in which they cache them. Then again, apart 
from the number of ducks they shoot in summer and rabbits they snare in winter, 
they eat a large number of the fur bearing animals they kill, bear, lynx, muskrat, beaver 
and skunk, but they won't eat foxes, martens, otter or fisher unless they are really 
hungry. One hears occasionally of cases of extreme hardship, where Indians and their 
families have gone on hunting expeditions, been unsuccessful and reduced almost to 
starvation, but these cases are rare and very often due to improvidence in spending 
what they had on trash instead of taking a little grub to see them through in the event 
of unsuccess. 

LIQUOR. 

If the reports were true that large quantities of liquor were frequently brought 
into the district and sold to the natives, things have taken a decided turn for the better. 
A freighter last spring was convicted and fined for having liquor in his possession at 
Aseno River and John Gladu was fined for giving liquor to a beaver squaw. We were 
unable to discover where Gladu obtained the liquor, but I was told that one or two 
gentlemen felt extremely uncomfortable at the time the case came off. These gentle- 
men have since left the district. To the best of my knowledge and belief the illicit 
importation and sale of whiskey is at a standstill. Permits have been allowed recently 
for Lesser Slave Lake, but I don't think the privilege has been abused in any way and 
if it is I shall soon hear of it. There have been a few cases of drunk and disorderly 
among the half-breeds, but it has been proved beyond doubt that these cases were the 
result of ginger drinking. The sale of this stuff and perfume still remains a thorn in 
the side to those who have the welfare of the native population at heart. Things have 
been quiet for some months past, but I am afraid it has been a compulsory term of 
sobriety due to the fact that there has been no ginger or perfume for sale, but I am told 
on good authority that a large consignment is expected shortly, the H. B. Co. bringing 
100 doz. of ginger besides perfume. This ginger is put up in 2 oz. bottles, costs about 
$1.62 per doz. landed here and is retailed at 50c. a bottle. Every trader very naturally 
wants to make as much money as possible, and every H. B. Go's, official wants the 
returns of his post to show as large a profit as possible, but from conversations I have had 
throughout the country with these traders and officials, I can safely say that 90 p. c. 
would like to see intoxicants of every description prohibited. I don't mean permits, 
for they are only granted to responsible parties, but this ginger, perfume, beef iron and 
wine, etc., and they claim that a better fur trade would be done. As it is now, if one 



60 -VO A' TH- WES T MO UNTED POL ICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

keeps it, they all have to keep it, for it is almost the first thing asked for and if they 
cannot obtain from one trader, off they go with their fur to some other place where they 
can, so from a business point of view, the H. B. Co. and traders would be foolish not to 
keep it, but it does seem inconsistent that liquor of all kinds is prohibited, and the un- 
limited importation and sale of ginger, tire, proved by chemical analysis to contain large 
percentages of proof spirit is allowed. 

SETTLERS. 

With the exception of the Roman Catholic and Church of England missions and 
traders there are very few white people in the district. There are three white settlers 
here, they have small shacks and own one team of horses, they make a livelihood by 
taking odd jobs, such as freighting, hauling hay and wood, ttc. At Grand Prairie there 
are four white men trapping. Messrs. Bredin and Cornwall, traders of this place have 
a ranche there, they have about thirty-five head of cattle and broke about fifty acres. 
They had fifteen to twenty acres under cultivation, wheat and oats and raised a splendid 
garden. Mr. Bredin was unable to tell me the yield of grain per acre, but said it was 
good and first class quality. The Grand Prairie, from all accounts, has been well 
named, it is about fifty miles square, with the finest of feed, also a plentiful supply of 
wood and water. From what I hear of the climate I should judge it to be about the 
same as Maple Creek only better. Several halfbreed families have settled there recently 
and I am told that several more are going there from Lac St. Anne. Under these cir- 
cumstances I would advise a police detachment there instead of at Sturgeon Lake, as 
being more central, as Port St. John's, Dunvegan and Sturgeon Lake could all be patrolled 
from Grand Prairie. At Spirit Rivers Messrs. Macleod and Gilroy are ranching and 
doing well, the former was one of the many unfortunate Klondikers that came by this 
route, however, he managed to tide over the storm of adversity and start a ranche and 
w^ent out this fall to bring his family in and is also going to try and induce some of 
his friends to come up and settle. At Vermilion on the Peace River there are three 
families named Lawrence, all farming and ranching, also two or three others whose 
names I have forgotten. They raise their own flour and have a plentiful supply of 
butter and eggs. At Fort Chipew^yan I think the only white settlers are Messrs. 
Emerson and McSwain and both these men are reported to have small private means. 

HALF-BREEDS. 

There are between five and six hundred half-breeds living in this settlement and 
scattered round the lake. They make their living by freighting, trapping and the 
young men work on the boats in the summer time. They nearly all have a few head of 
cattle and horses, and live in log shacks in winter and tents and tepees in summer. 
The majority of them live in a happy go lucky style, taking no thought for the morrow, 
make a few dollars at freighting, boating, etc., and spend it on a lot of useless truck, 
coloured handkerchiefs, perfume, ttc, a few" on the other hand are prosperous farmers, 
they have lots of cattle and good horses, put up plenty of hay, raise oats and have good 
gardens. At Peace River there are about sixty-five, none at Dunvegan and about five 
families at Fort St. John's, the last moved up from here to hunt. At Vermilion there 
are about twelve families, they have cattle and horses and do a little farming and hunt 
in the winter. At Chipewyan there are about twenty-five families, at Ford du Lac, 
six, and at Fort McMurray two families. 

TRAVELLING AND PATROLS. 

As the rivers and lakes afford the easiest means of travelling through the Athabasca 
district, as soon as the ice disappears nearly all our patrols are done in canoe. Those 
that have to be done on land are attended with great difficulties, viz., to Sturgeon Lake, 
Whitefish Lake and Peace River crossing, owing to the state of the trails. Up to two 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR H EST 61 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

years ago, dry seasons followed one another in succession for six or seven years, it was 
hard to make good camping places through scarcity of water, but the last two years it 
has been just the reverse. A large amount of freight is taken across the Peace River 
portage, cutting the road up badly. The Hudson's Bay Co. made this road years ago and 
kept it in good repair, sending out a gang of men to fix the bridges, &c., every spring, 
but as soon as the traders came the company ceased making these improvements, and 
the road was allowed to go from bad to worse until this summer it became practically 
impassable. Last July when I went over it I never saw^ such a condition of things, it 
was one continuous mudhole from start to finish, bridges down, corduroy rotted out and 
floating. It was as much as horses could do to walk through it without having to draw. 
We had a wagon and four good horses with about 400 lbs. on and it was as much as we 
could do to get through. Mr. Fraser and his men have been at w^ork on it since last 
August and I hear have made a good road, so that things will no doubt be better next 
summer. 

Travelling on these rivers is also attended with difficulties. Going down stream 
with a current of four or five miles an hour is easy work, but coming up stream is quite 
another matter. The more one travels on these rivers the stranger it seems that no 
improvement has been made in the way of getting up stream. These unwieldy flat 
bottomed scows and York boats have been tracked up for generations one might say, 
six to eight men on the end of a tracking line dragging a boat with several tons of 
freight on board against a strong current, crawling over fallen logs, sometimes up to 
their waist in mud arid w ater, and in the fall of the year their clothes freezing on them. 
The Peace River is one of the finest in the country, with a stretch of water four or five 
hundred miles in length, with no rapids to speak of, that is from Hudson's Hope to the 
chutes, the rapids sixty miles below Vermilion, and yet I believe I am correct in saying- 
there has never been a steamer on it. Last summer the water was so high the men in 
lots of places could not track, they had to pull themselves along by the bushes until 
their hands were raw, and it took them three weeks to track up from Vermilion to 
Peace River crossing, 300 miles. On September 12,1 had to send Sergt. Anderson and 
a constable to Vermilion on special duty, and they arrived here with two prisoners on 
October 12, as luck would have it, the water was low and the tracking was good, but 
four men had to be hired to track up at a cost of ^$30 a piece, besides their food. Sergt. 
Anderson steered the boat and Const. Riddoch was escort. The money expended on a 
few trips of this kind would soon pay for a small steamer, and we would be compara- 
tively independent of wind and current. There is any quantity of dry wood the whole 
length of the river, and good coal can be obtained up Pine Creek, above Fort St. John, 
that could be rafted down to the river. It is rumoured here that the railroad will pass 
through the Grand Prairie, and that the Hudson's Bay Company are not going to rebuild 
the steamer Athabasca until the}' know for certain. The machinery in her is good yet, 
but she requires a new hull. In the event of this coming to pass, they would rebuild 
her on the Peace River, and freight their supplies from the railroad to the Peace. This 
would do away with navigation on the Athabasca below the Landing and avoid the 
danger of the rapids between the Grand and Fort McMurray. The steamer Athahaska 
would take all the supplies down the Peace to the Chutes rapids, the Grahame from 
below the Chutes to Smith's Landing, and the Wriyley from Fort Smith to Great Slave 
Lake and the Mackenzie River. 

When the winter once sets in good and solid, one can travel everywhere with dogs, 
and most places with horses and flatsleighs. With horses it is a qu'>stion of being able 
to procure hay, or of the trail being sufficiently cut out to admit of a horse going through, 
but I think for all round work, dogs would be the better of the two and decidedly 
cheaper. 

COXDUCT, ETC. 

The men have been exemplary in their conduct and seem to be liked and respected 
by all the desirable members of the community. They at times have hard trips, 
wet night and day, and sometimes walking up to their thighs in mud and water. I 



62 NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

know that they have had to supplement their kit by buying boots and overalls on several 
occasions, and they wear out a good many more pairs of moccasins than they are issued 
with. Any little luxury outside their rations they wish to buy they have to pay exor- 
bitant prices for. For these reasons I beg to recommend that the members of the north- 
ern detachments receive extra pay. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

C. H. WEST, Inspector. 
Com. Peace River Sub-District. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENLBNT SANDERS 63 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



APPENDIX E. 

A^^NUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT G. E. SANDERS, D.S.O., COM- 
MANDING ' E ' DIVISION, CALGARY. 

North-west Mounted Police, 

District Office, Calgary, November 30, 1901. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the annual report of ' E ' Division for the year 
ending this date. 

On my return from South Africa, where I had the honour of serving as second in 
command of the Canadian Mounted Rifles, I took over the command of ' E ' Division 
and Calgary district from Inspector J. O. Wilson, on January 28, 1901. 

general state of district. 

The district over which my division has police supervision extends from Red Deer 
in the north to High River in the south, and from British Columbia in the west to near 
Medicine Hat in the east. In the last few years settlers have spread out all over it, 
and the population increased, making it, in my opinion, the most important in the 
Territories ; owing, among other things, to the nature of the principal industry (stock- 
raising), and the facilities for crime in connection therewith, unless there is adequate 
police protection. 

Since I left here in the autumn of 1899, a marked progress is observable throughout 
the whole district. Prosperous villages have sprung up along the C. and E. Railway to 
the north, where I remember only section houses before ; older settlements have in- 
creased in size and ranche houses and farms are now found where there was nothing but 
the rolling prairie and a stray cayote to be seen a year or two ago. Settlers have been 
pouring into the Northern country throughout the year and the amount of land taken 
up has been unprecedented in this part of Canada. Combined with this a most excel- 
lent season has gladdened the heart of the farmer and crops of all kinds have been very 
large. If there has been anything to cause complaint it would be in the slight falling 
off of the calf crop, mainly due to the grass last fall not having cured properly and the 
cattle in the spring being very poor. 

The city of Calgary has doubled its business in the last few years, and signs of 
prosperity meet one on every side. Houses to rent are almost unobtainable and many 
large residences and business blocks are being built. 

The amount of work which we have had to attend to has increased enormously, 
and requires a larger number of men than, I have had, to supervise it properly. I have 
not last year's report by me, but I would suggest a comparison between the crime, 
correspondence and general work of this division with those of others. 

crime. 

The attached schedule, which has been prepared from the records, shows the number 
of cases brought to trial by the police in this district during the past year. You will 
notice that crime has not diminished, as there are some seventy odd cases more than 
last year. No doubt that the Innisfail and Red Deer districts help to swell the number, 
these two outposts being transferred to this command on October 1, 1900. 

Fifty-three charges of vagrancy were dealt with, the delinquents in the majority of 
cases being lazy and thriftless half-breeds, who apparently under present conditions are 



64 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

unable to do any good for themselves and whose future lot is much more a matter of 
concern than that of the Indians. 

The regular tramp, I am pleased to relate, has not been as conspicuous as in former 
years, this I attribute to a proper appreciation on their part of the difficulties in evading 
the police when travelling through the Territories, and the prompt punishment accorded 
to them in the past, as you will notice there were only fourteen cases of tramps arrested 
for stealing rides on C.P.R. against forty-one last year. 

A few cases of importance included in the attached schedule require some comment. 

The JIuygard Murder. — This case was mentioned in the annual report of last year, 
the murder took place on Nose Creek, quite close to Calgary, on November 25, 1900. 
Insp. Wilson who was in command at the time left no stone unturned to discover the 
murderer, and one James Mansfield Smith was arrested for the crime. The evidence 
was entirely circumstantial, but the links in the chain were practically complete. The 
prisoner was tried before a judge and jury on February 2, and acquitted. Insp. Wilson 
reported to me, as also the Crown prosecutor, that there was no other person upon 
whom a vestige of suspicion rested. That the murderer, whoever he was, should not 
suffer the penalty of his crime is much to be regretted, especially as I have another 
murder and another acquittal to record below. In both these cases I am satisfied the 
police elicited all the evidence obtainable. 

The Kerr Murder. — This occurred near Innisfail, on the night of April 15, 1901. 
David Kerr was killed by his brother in law, Arthur Bioletti, Constable Shoebotham, 
who was on the spot arrested Bioletti, who admitted the crime, but claimed he had acted 
in self-defence. I proceeded at once to Innisfail, attended the Coroner's inquest, and 
wired for the Crown prosecutor to attend the preliminary hearing. The circumstances 
were these : Kerr and Bioletti had quarreled, the former had accused his brother in law 
of improper conduct with his sister, and an arrangement had been made by which Bioletti 
was to pay Kerr a certain sum to leave the country. On April 15, Kerr left word with 
.Bioletti's mother that he wished to see her son, and stated the settlement must be made 
quickly ; this is the story of the defence. On receiving this message, Bioletti after a 
hard day's work, decides to walk out to Kerr's place seven miles distant and very bad 
roads. He arms himself with a loaded revolver and several loose cartridges. On 
arrival at Kerr's ranch about 11 p.m., he called out Kerr, they quarrel, and he shoots 
his brother in law once through the heart and later on when he was lying on the ground 
through the head. The shooting took place 30 yards from the house. Bioletti's defence 
was that Kerr attacked him with an axe. Kerr was a right handed man and when 
found had a soft cap in his right hand and the axe was at the house 30 yards away. 
The second bullet entered the left side of the head and came out at the right and was 
found in the ground, where the position of the head and course of the bullet through it, 
would indicate it should lie. This shot was proved to have been fired within four inches 
of the victim's head — the hair was scorched. The jury, however, were instructed that 
this last shot could not have been fired when the deceased was on the ground. Bioletti 
was honourably acquitted on June 18, 1901. 

There was one case of cattle stealing brought up for trial which was dismissed, the 
accused being two brothers, John and James Hewitt, of Cochrane. There was not suf- 
ficient evidence to obtain a conviction — the facts of the case being : That a calf, the 
property of one G. W. Johnson, of Cochrane, was found in Hewitt's corrals with a num- 
ber of other cattle, and Johnson at once laid information against the Hewitts, charging 
them with the theft. There are great facilities for stealing cattle, especially calves, and 
the temptation to do so is constantly with those on the cattle range. 

On June 11, Reg. No. 1628 Staif-Sergt. Dee, who is stationed at Okotoks, laid in- 
formation before me, charging James Lineham, James Fisher and Alex. McDougall, all 
of Okotoks, with the theft of thirty-one head of cattle, the property of Messrs. Gould 
and Hubbard. The facts of the case are as follows : — On June 5, thirty-one head of 
yearling and two-year-old eastern cattle (commonly called dogies) were run off from Mr. 
Gould's corrall, near Okotoks. The animals were unbranded, but ear-marked. Staff- 
Sgt. Dee was away on patrol at the time, but immediately on his return went to work. 
The cattle were traced to Crooked Coulee and from thence to Tongue Creek. Some 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT SANDERS 65 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

ranchers had seen a bunch of cattle driven by three men, and Staff-Sgt. Dee found the 
cattle near a corral where they had been branded and their ear marks cut off. The 
brand placed on the cattle was that of James Lineham. From information received, 
Stafl-Sgt. Dee ascertained the three men who had taken the cattle were James Lineham, 
James Fisher and Alex. McDougall, all of Okotoks. They left the country before StafF- 
Sgt. Dee could connect them with the crime. Warrants for their arrest were issued and 
descriptions sent in every direction, but nothing reliable has been heard of them since, 
although we receive information from time to time which is being acted upon. Lineham 
has been reported several times as being in hiding in the district, if so he cannot be 
having a pleasant time. At the beginning of this month (November), finding thaj} these 
men were still at large, you authorized my offering a reward of $200 for their arrest. 

In the latter part of August, a man called Carl Jensen, who had just completed a 
term in the guard room, broke into a private house near Calgary at night and attempted 
an indecent assault upon a Galician servant girl. The police were not notified till late 
the following day, when Constable Elkins was put on the case. He discovered the 
identity of the assailant and traced him as having gone west. Before he left in pursuit, 
T received word from the station agent at Cochrane that a man had assaulted a little 
girl. Constable Peters was detailed to proceed there at once, and on arrival he wired 
me that the ofiender in this case was the same Carl Jensen whom we were after in Cal- 
gary. Peters had to follow him west from Cochrane on a hand-car and arrested him at 
Morley during the night. Unfortunately our troubles with this criminal were not yet 
over. Constable Peters brought him for his preliminary hearing, for the assault at 
Cochrane, before Mr. Fisher, J. P., of that place, aud he was committed for trial. Just 
before Constable Peters got on the train to bring his prisoner to Calgary the latter broke 
away from him and escaped in the darkness. The whole village of Cochrane turned out 
to search, but without avail. We did not catch Jensen till some days afterwards, when 
Staff-Sgt. Brooke very cleverly secured him at Gleichen. He is committed for trial at 
the next sitting of the Supreme Court, on three charges — one for rape, one for attempted 
rape, and the third for escaping from lawful custody. The trial takes place on Decem- 
ber 10 next. 

There are six cases of horse stealing on the classified list. No convictions were 
obtained, and, as I have already reported to you, there seem insurmountable difficulties 
in the way of having parties guilty of this offence punished. To a lay mind legal quib- 
bles and technicalities seem to override common sense. One case, viz., that of a horse, 
the property of Mr. J. R. Thompson, which was branded by a man called Thomas Camp- 
bell, I made the subject of a special report to you. Campbell was acquitted, but has 
since left the country. 

The strike of the trackmen of the Canadian Pacific Railway, which commenced in 
the latter part of June, gave us quite a lot of trouble and extra work. Mr. Niblock, 
superintendent of this division, asked me for assistance and I afforded him all I could, 
at the same time seeing that the strikers were not unfairly dealt with. The majority of 
those on strike were foreigners, mainly Galicians, and very hard to reason with. Sev- 
eral times I had to clear strikers from the railway yards and the station, and to prevent 
them from boarding trains. Supt. Niblock organized working gangs which he accom- 
panied himself, and I furnished him with police to prevent those working being dis- 
turbed. On this duty I had two men west of Calgary and one to the east. The crime 
resulting from the strike, taking it all in all, was very small, the men behaving well, 
and Supt. Niblock and the officials handling them with tact. I, in many instances 
where the offence was not serious, explained matters to the men and persuaded them 
their best course was to behave themselves. A Galician who threatened to wreck a 
train was arrested at Tilley, but acquitted on his trial. Thirty-two Italians seized a car 
in British Columbia. Mr. Duchesnay, C. P. R. superintendent, wired to have them 
stopped at Calgary, and on arrival Corpl. Brankley and five men arrested the whole 
party. Next day they were all charged before me with the offence. The ring-leader was 
given a small sentence and the remainder let off on suspended sentence. They all agreed 
to go to work for the company in the North-west Territories, where they said there 
were police to protect them. They were afraid to work in British Columbia. The 
28—5 



66 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

strike did not terminate till August 18, and hereunder I give a letter I received from 
Mr. J. Niblock, C.P.R. superintendent, living at Calgar}^ : — 

Calgary, August 15, 1901. 
Superintendent G. E. Sanders, 

North-west Mounted Police, Calgary. 

Dear Sir, — I am in receipt of your letter of the 8th inst., regarding Constables 
Fowell and Peters, and in reply beg to state that I will now be able to get along with- 
out them, and will arrange their transportation to Calgary as soon as they receive their 
necessary orders from you. I am sure that the company greatly appreciate the valuable 
services rendered by your most competent force during the present trouble. 

(Sgd.) J, NIBLOCK 

Under the heading of Indians you will notice there have been many cases of drunk- 
enness, this in spite of the severe punishment invariably meted out to those who supply 
the liquor. I am glad to say that in every case we have arrested parties guilty of 
supplying intoxicants to Indians. One Samuel Bruneau, a half-breed, succeeded in 
evading the police for some time. He gave a Sarcee Indian, ' Many Pans,' liquor on 
Oct. 18, and was not caught till November 28, when Corporal Brankleygot an inkling 
of his whereabouts, and acting on this cleverly captured him at about 2 o'clock in the 
morning. He was hiding in the thick bush along the river valley west of Calgary. 

In concluding my remarks on the subject of crime, I regret to say there has been a 
great deal said in regard to cattle and horse-stealing which goes undetected. That 
many cases of this kind should escape the police is only natural, but there might be 
much less if the stockmen and small ranchers would only be fair with us. I find it is 
impossible, except in very rare cases, to get ranchers to give information to our men, 
and when spoken to about it they give some such excuse for their reticence as the fol- 
lowing : That they are afraid of their neighbours, or that ' it is worth a steer or a calf 
to find out what one's neighbours are like.' As I have already stated facilities and 
temptations for cattle stealing are very great throughout the country, and there is not 
the slightest doubt that this class of crime is prevalent. More police detachments and 
patrols would certainly act as a preventative, but a great deal can be accomplished by 
the ranchers themselves, many of whom practically protect the men who are robbing 
them. I have made suggestions to you during the year relative to this class of crime. 



PRISONERS ARRESTED ON REQUISITION FROM WITHOUT. 

On February 9, Geo. Nofield was arrested on requisition f i-om Wetaskiwin on charge 
of fraud. 

On July 4, W. H. Mannix was arrested at Okotoks on requisition from city police, 
charge forgery. 

On July 20, C. A. Ketchen was arrested on requisition from Inspector Belcher, 
Edmonton, charge forgery. 

On August 14, F. Donoghue was arrested on requisition from city police, at Morley, 
charge disobeying summons. 

On August 9, J. Fisher, E. Cufflin and J. Stagg were arrested at Millarville on 
requisition from Macleod, charge horse-stealing. The evidence in this case was chiefly 
worked up by Staff-Sergt. Dee and Constable Pierce — they were all committed to stand 
their trial on the above charge. 

On August 23, The Wolf, Sarcee Indian was arrested on requisition from Macleod, 
charge horse-stealing. 

On August 28, F. Mainwaring was arrested at Calgary on requisition from Innisfail, 
charge fraud. 

On August 31, M. Lauder was arrested at Banff on requisition from Wetaskiwin, 
charge obtaining money under false pretenses. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT SANDERS 67 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

On November 4, J. Lachappelle was arrested at Calgary on requisition from Mac- 
leod, charge supplying liquor to Indians. 

Classified Summary of Crimes in Calgary District for the year 1901. 



Offence. 



Offensive weapons — 

Unlawfully carrying concealed weapons. 
Misleading justice — 

Perjury. ..... 

Offences against religion, morals, &c. — 

Vagrancy 

Drunk, &c 

Gambling . . 

Nuisance 

Housebreaking and theft 

Offences against property — 

Embezzlement 



Cattle stealing. 

Malicious injury to property.. 

Theft 

Forgery 

Horse stealing 



Fraud 

Cruelty to animals 

Offences against the person — 

A ssault 

Indecent assault . 

Attempted suicide 

Murder 

Shooting with intent 

Rape 

Attempted rape 

Intimidation 

Escapes and rescues — 

Escape from lawful custody . . 

Offences against Indian Act — 

Drunk ... . . 

Supplying liquor to Indians 

Offences against Railway Act — 

Stealing ride on C. P. R 

Unlawfully taking possession of C.P.R. car. 
Offences against N. W. T. Ordinances- 
Non-payment of wages 

Driving horses off range 

Setting out prairie fires 

Shooting game out of season 

Liquor Ordinances 

Refusing to fight prairie fire 

Miscellaneous 

Drunk whilst interdicte^i 



m 
Q 



Total. 



36 
12 

14 
32 

7 
1 
3 
2 
3 
1 



317 



13 



rt 


O! 






O 


Q 


3 






1 


49 




47 












7 




11 













237 



04 



Remarks- 



Case withdrawn. 
2 awaiting trial. 

Prosecution failed to ap- 



1 awaiting trial. 

1 

1 

1 settled out of court. 

1 awaiting trial. 



1 settled out of court. 



1 awaiting trial. 
1 



2 settled. out of court. 
1 awaiting jtxdgment. 



16 



PRAIRIE FIRES. 

The extremely wet spring and summer was the means of keeping the district free 
from prairie fires until well on in October. Since then we have had two that burnt 
over a large area of country, one of which was the most destructive that has, to my 
knowledge, ever visited the North-west. 

The rain, our protection before, was the cause of our undoing now, for it made 
the prairie grass grow much higher than usual, and rendered it very difficult to fight a 
fire once it got any headway. 
28-51 



68 SOBTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

On October 1 9, the section foreman at Airdrie when burning the right of way along 
the C. & E. railway, the fire got away from him and burned over a very large tract of 
country to the east of the C. tfe E. and north of the C. P. R. A few hay stacks were 
destrojT^ed, but apart from this there was not much damage. 

The police and settlers fought this fire for several hours, and finally had to give it 
up as hopeless. Several of our men had their hair and clothing burnt. 

On October 30, the section foreman, R. Howard, was brought before me charged 
with starting the fire. The inquiry show^ed that he had taken more than the necessary 
precautions, as called for by the North-west ordinances, to prevent the fire from getting 
away, yet ipso facto he was guilty. I am submitting the following for the judge's 
decision : ' Whether Howard should be convicted under the true construction and inter- 
pretation of sections 2 and 5 of chapter 87 of the Consolidated Ordinances.' 

The second fire started near Queenstown, south of the Blackfoot Reserve on Octo- 
ber 28, 1901. One Dan McNelly was arrested by Staff Sergt. Brooke for starting it, 
and pleaded gvilty before D. F. Knight, J.P., at Gleichen. The cause was a lighted 
match thrown by McNelly to the ground after lighting his pipe, and from this thought- 
less action thousands of dollars worth of property were lost. The fire burnt south and 
then w^est with extraordinary rapidity, people who thought themselves safe and miles 
away from the fire would suddenly from a change in the wind find it right on them, 
travelling at the rate of some forty and even sixty miles an hour. Nothing could escape 
it, and horses, cattle and wild animals were burnt to death or left so injured that they 
died shortly after. Staff Sergt. Dee reporting on this fire says : ' The prairie fire that 
started at the end of October between the Bow and Little Bow caused great loss of 
stock, hay and pasture. In the river bottoms along the Little Bow there are bunches 
of horses and cattle burned to death, others were so badly injured that they had to be 
destroyed. The majority of the dead animals had their eyes burntout, and some had 
their legs and hoofs burned off. The area burnt was about fifty square miles. George 
Lane estimates his loss at $15,000, others think it will be about $25,000.' 

Information gathered from different sources leads me to think that it will take 
$30,000 to cover the loss of property. The heaviest losers were the following : — 

Geo. Lane, approximate loss $15,000 

Mr. Langord .. 5,000 

Mr. G. Ross ,. 2,000 

P. Burns & Co., .. 3,000 

There have been one or two small fires since started by sparks from the engine 
along the C. & E. railway. The settlers were called out by the police and managed to 
put them out. One case, where there seems direct evidence against the C. P. R., I 
referred to the Crown prosecutor, and he has advised that the company be summoned 
through its agent. I have sent the matter to the constable at Olds to attend to. 



DRILL AND TRAINING. 

The division was thoroughly drilled, both dismounted and mounted, during the 
summer. The usual setting-up drill was gone through in the spring. 

I regret to say that I was unable to carry out the complete target practice, many 
things preventing my doing so. I found it very hard to get a squad out of the prelimin- 
ary practice, due a good deal, I believe, to the rifles we have and the imperfect sighting. 
The arrangement by which we use the same range as the Calgary Rifle Association is 
not satisfactory, and next year we should try to have a range of our own. 

It is impossible to get the men for target practice at any fixed time, and when I 
could get a squad together, I found the range occupied by the association. 

Lectures on police and other duties were given during the winter and spring. 



REPORT OF Si. 'PERINTENDENT SANDERS 69 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

DISTRIBUTIOX AXD STRENGTH OF DIVISION. 

A distribution state showing the strength of this division on November 30 is 
attached. 

The effective strength of the division, however, on this date is 3 officers and 35 N. 
C. O's and men. From the total strength shown on distribution state, the following 
deductions have to be made, 9 special constables including scouts, ,5 N. C. O's and men 
transferred to the Yukon and not struck off, 1 constable discharged by purchase and 
not struck off, 1 constable in cells and sentenced to be dismissed and one constable in 
Regina indefinitely with injured knee. 

Six constables, two of whom are now in hospital to perform night and day guards 
and look after, as a rule, about 20 prisoners. The division is much under strength for 
the work, to which is added the care of a large number of prisoners. 

The detachments are under strength and more are required. The clerical staff is 
inadequate and should be increased. The enormous amount of correspondence that 
comes through my office and the extra work thrown on a division stationed at a central 
and distributing point like Calgary, make the clerical work particularly heavy, and 
Corpl. Brankley, my orderly room clerk, has done two men's work. 

This amount of office work with a staff not large enough to cope with it, effects the 
general w^ork of the force, for I am so tied down with it, that it is impossible to give 
the attention to outside work that I feel I would like to. 



HORSES. 

We have a very good and serviceable lot of horses in the division. The total 
strength is 20 team and 30 saddle horses. Twenty-five remounts have been received 
and have turned out well and have been easily trained. Twelve horses have been cast 
and sold and fetched good prices. Eleven horses have been transferred to other 
divisions. 

From present indications I do not think that there will be more than three horses 
to cast next year. 

The total mileage for this division during the past year is 162,782 miles. I have a 
few more team horses than I require and I understand you are sending four of them 
to Macleod. 



BARRACK BUILDINGS, REPAIRS, ETC. 

The main building, where the men's barrack rooms, mess room, offices, tkc, are, is 
in good repair. I have had quite a lot of interior painting and kalsomining done this 
year. A Kelsey heater was put in last winter to replace the old furnace under the 
centre block, and has turned out such an economiser of fuel that you authorized me in 
October last to have one put under the north block, this has been done, the work being 
completed on the 15th of this month. 

The guard room is in good repair, but is not large enough to hold the increased 
number of prisoners and lunatics we are now called upon to look after. As a rule we 
have more than the cells will accommodate. The fence around the prison yard will have 
to be replaced in the spring, and I would recommend that the size be increased. 



FIRE PROTECTION. 

The fire protection is ample and in good order. There are four hydrants in the 
barrack inclosure. I received 500 feet of new hose in November. I had all the old 
hose thoroughly overhauled and tested by Chief Smart of the C. F. B., who put it in a 
thorough state of repair. This with the new hose received completed our requirements. 



70 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
INDIANS. 

Referring to Inspector AVilson's report of last year, the particulars of ' Little Fish ' 
and ' Butterfly ' (Saulteux Indians) from Medicine Hat are recorded where they shot at 
a police patrol with intent to murder. They were brought before the Hon. Mr. Justice 
Scott on February 15, and each sentenced to six months hard labour. They had €tlready 
been six months awaiting trial. 

Two Blackfeet Indians are now in the guard room awaiting trial on the charge of 
housebreaking and theft on Sept. 7, on the Red Deer. I should like to draw your 
attention to the excellent work performed by Staff Sergeant Brooke in this case. Mr. 
Kelly, w^hose house was broken into, had no suspicion of any one, and Staff Sergeant 
Brooke, knowing these two Indians had been away from their reserve, had their return 
watched and found them with the stolen property. 

The above are the only two cases of note as you will see from the magisterial re- 
turns. As usual a great many have come to grief by giving way to a too strong desire 
for liquor — thirty-two being tried for intoxication during the past year, and twelve 
for supplying them with liquor. 

The Indians on the different reserves are in some ways improving and in others 
degenerating. The best sign is they are taking more kindly to work. The majority of 
them have a number of horses and cattle, farming being their chief industry. They put 
up considerable hay in the summer and get good prices for it, but they are not allowed 
to dispose of it in open market at Calgary without the necessary permits from their 
agents. Some bother has been caused by them staying away from their reserves and 
hanging about the towns. We make them move away whenever possible, but more 
often than not they are protected b}^ a pass from their agent, which we have to respect. 

CANTEEN. 

The canteen at this post is in a flourishing condition. We are not under the 
necessity of keeping a large stock as the bulk of the goods are jDurchased locally in 
Calgary. Each month is started with the canteen free of liabilities. 

An English billiard table was purchased last winter for the amusement of the men, 
to which the canteen contributed $300. Altogether $654.92 has been given in grants, 
which is an excellent showing with so small a command, and the temptations in a town 
like Calgary to spend their money elsewhere and thus reduce the profits earned. ' 

PHYSIQUE. 

The aA^erage physique'"of the members of this division is above the standard. The 
men are clean built and athletic. The average height five feet nine and a half inches 
and chest measurement thirty-eight and a half inches. 

The division football team for the fourth year in succession are the champions of 
the North-west Territory Association Football League. This year competing with seven 
particularly strong clubs. 



ASSISTANCE TO OTHER DEPARTMENTS. 

DOMINION DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

The police as a whole do a lot of work for this department, and Staff Sergeant 
Hobbs has nearly all his time taken up attending to his duties as district veterinary 
inspector. The detachments and patrols report, and quarantine all animals suspected of 
contagious disease, and see that quarantine regulations are properly observed. The 
greater part of this district has been quarantined for ' Mange,' and is still. Owing to 
the numerous inspections of cattle that had to be made, Staff-sergeant Hobbs was unable 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT SANDERS 71 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

to attend all, and whenever this was the case I called in Veterinary Surgeon Riddle. 
The following table shows a portion of the work performed for this department : — 

Horses destroyed for glanders 7 

Cattle destroyed for actinomycosis 3 

Cattle inspected for export 15,561 

Horses inspected for export 450 

TERRITORIAL DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE. 

Small-pox of a mild form was prevalent in the Edmonton district all winter, but 
Calgary and district escaped any sign of it until May ; when a man called Ross, brother 
of the station master at Cochrane, was reported as suffering from the disease, he had 
previously been in Edmonton and contracted it there. Constable Aspinall was sent to 
enforce the quarantine, Ross was placed in a tent near the village, and strange to say 
suffered so little from the effects that he was able to be about and attend to his own 
wants during the whole period of his illness. Later on it was discovered the station 
master's baby had small-pox. I visited the place accompanied by Doctors MacDonald 
and MacKid. The village of Cochrane was quarantined and another constable placed 
there to assist Constable Aspinall. The Canadian Pacific Railway installed an operator 
in a tent to the west of the town and the Station was closed. The disease was stamped 
out as far as Cochrane was concerned. 

On May 28, another' case occurred at Calgary, which was handled by the city 
authorities, it originated from the north. 

Whilst the small-pox epidemic was at its height round Edmonton, I had to send the 
officer commanding ' G ' Division assistance. On February 14, Constable Firth was sent 
to Edmonton on quarantine duty, returning in September. Constables Aspinall and 
AVills went to Ponoka on March 1, returning on May 15. Constables Holt and Piper 
were sent to Edmonton on May 7, returning on July 5. 

ASSISTANCE TO INDIAN DEPARTMENT. 

There has not been anything special in this connection during the year, merely the 
usual assistance the police afford by keeping the Indians in order and making it easier 
for the agents to uphold their authority. All Indian boys who have escaped from the 
different Industrial Schools we have captured and returned. I sent a patrol of three 
men to the Blackfoot reserve, August 27, to assist Staff-Sergeant Brooke in keeping 
order during the Sun Dance. There was no disturbance and everything passed off 
quietly. 

Staff-Sergeant Brooke and Interpreter Brazeau were placed at the disposal of Indian 
Commissioner, the Hon. David Laird, when he was making his preparations, and during 
the visit of Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York. In 
connection with this, Staff-Sergeant Brooke did a great deal of work. 

ASSISTANCE TO MILITIA DEPARTMENT. 

As usual we have kept a store of small-arm ammunition for this department, and 
issued same on repayment to the Local Rifle Associations. 

Orders for recruiting for the South African Constabulary were received on January 
26 ; applications were distributed and clerical work performed until the actual enlisting 
February 21. The number sent from here was sixty-one, selected from about 150 
personal applicants. I was pestered with inquiries from all parts of the country, British 
Columbia and the L^nited States. Extra work of this kind, suddenly thrown on a super- 
intendent commanding a police post w ith one clerk, is no light matter. Seven members 
of my command were granted a free discharge to join the Constabulary, viz.: Constables 



72 



XORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Audy, Crockett, Grant,' Hughes, Moore, MacBrien and MacPherson. The whole party- 
left here on March 1. They were a fine body of men, and should make good recruits 
for the corps they joined. 

On August 28, Lt.-Col. Codd, A.M.S., and Assistant Surgeon Bell, of the N.W.M. 
Police, arrived from the east to hold medical board on South African invalids. A room 
in barracks was placed at their disposal and an orderly detailed. 



IMPERIAL ARMY REMOUNT DEPARTMENT. 

On June 10, I received word that Col. Dent and staff, purchasing remounts for the 
Imperial Army, would arrive next daj'^. This was some weeks before I, or any one in 
this district, expected him, however, in conjunction with some of the ranchers and others, 
I set to work with as little delay as possible to have all horsemen notified. 

Mr. C. Peterson, the Deputy Minister of Agriculture from Regina, accompanied 
him, and I assisted him in arranging the dates and places where horses would be pur- 
chased. This was advertised and with slight alterations carried out by Col. Dent. I 
supplied transport in the vicinityof Calgary, and sent a team to High River to meet 
the party there. All detachments were instructed to render what assistance they could. 
Between three and four hundred horses were bought in this district. Col. Dent before 
his departure wrote me a very kind letter, thanking me for the aid he had received from 
the force, specially mentioning Sergeant Browne at High Ri^•er. 



GUARDROOM. 



Our guardroom is the common jail of the district, and has been much overcrowded 
during the past year. In addition it is a temporary asylum for insane from the greater 
part of Alberta. All lunatics from Edmonton, in addition to vtry own district, are sent 
here to await the Lt. -Governor's directions as to their disposal, and escorts have to be 
sent from this division to escort them to Brandon Asylum. I have asked for a straight 
jacket and other appliances to handle violent lunatics properly. 

Reg. No. 3218 Constable Burke is the provost in charge of the prisoners. He has 
performed his duties very satisfactorily and kept excellent discipline. The following is 
his report : — 

North-west Mounted Police, 

Calgary, November 30, 1901. 
The Officer Commanding, 

N. W. M. PoUce, Calgary. 

I have the honour to submit the report of this guardroom for the year ending 
November 30, 1901. 

Fifteen prisoners were confined in the guardroom at the beginning of the year. 
Two hundred and thirty- three were received during the year, making a total of 248 
prisoners, classified thus :— 

Whites 146 

Halfbreeds 59 

Indians 43 

Total 248 

Of these only twenty-six were in the guardroom on transfer to jails and asylums in the 
east or wanted at other places in the Territories. The maximum number of prisoners 
were received in the month of July (seventy). The minimum number of prisoners were 
received in the month of January (five). 

The health of the prisoners has been good. Fourteen punishments were inflicted by 
you for minor breaches of discipline. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT SANDERS 



73 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

The guardroom buildings are in fair repair, excepting the yard fence. A new floor 
has been put down in the cage. 

Separate accommodation is urgently needed for female prisoners, lunatics and those 
awaiting trial. 

The total number of cells in this guardroom is fourteen, and at the present time 
there are twenty-one prisoners confined, which necessitates a doubling up, and renders 
it diflicult to maintain strict prison discipline. Better ventilation is required as the 
air towards morning becomes very unhealthy. After deducting prisoners in guard-room 
awaiting trial, on transfer, lunatics, etc., we find those actually serving or who have 
served, to be 103, made up as follows :— 



Crimf 



Number 

of 

Sentences. 



Attempted murder 

Carrying concealed weapons . . 
Malicious destruction of property 

Assault 

Stealing ride on C.P.R 

Drunk and disorderly 

Vagrancy 

Theft 



Indian Act. 



Liquor to Indians 

Drunk 

Intoxicants in possession 



Average 
Length of 
Sentence. 



6 months. 
10 days. 
3 months. 
1 month. 
5' 7 days. 
20-2 „ 
32-6 ,. 
96-4 „ 



3 months. 
25 -6 days. 
2 "5 months 



I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



D. C. BURKE, Constable, 

Provost. 



VISIT OF THEIR ROYAL HIGHNESSES THE DUKE AND DUCHESS OF CORNWALL AND YORK. 



Preparations for the visit of the royal party to Calgary commenced on September 
10, and on the 11th you arrived and went over every detail with me, continuing your 
journey to the coast next day to arrange details there. The following is a general out- 
line of what was to be done : — 

A provisional battalion of the force was to be concentrated at Calgary of a total 
strength of 244. In connection with this I was ordered to select a site for the camp, 
pitch it, arrange for supplies and camp equipment, equip and supply an ofiicers' and 
sergeants' mess, hire cooks, &c., everything to be in readiness for arrival of different 
detachments some days prior to the royal party reaching here. 

Towards the establishment of the battalion my division was to contribute two full 
troops, one four-in-hand and three single teams. Horses, particularly teams, to be got 
into such training that no matter what unusual sight or noise they might meet with 
they would remain quiet. 

A parade ground w^as to be prepared for the inspection. 

Arrangements to be made for assisting the Indian Department in connection with 
the gathering of Indians. 

Preparations for the lunch to be given Their Royal Highnesses by the ofiicers of 
the North-west Mounted Police. 

Interior of centre block of main barrack building to be painted, kalsomined and 
generally renovated. 



74 NORTH- WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWArtu VII., A. 1902 

Local C. P. R. authorities to be seen and provisions made for quickly entraining 
and dis-entraining horses and men. 

Distribution of medals, at request of Militia Department, to be looked after, notices 
sent out, applicants corresponded with and identified, and rolls prepared, &c. 

Their Royal Highnesses were timed to arrive here at 8.30 a.m. of September 28, 
the official programme being as follows : — 

8.30 a.m., arrival of royal train. 

8.45 a.m., inspection of ]!^orth-west Mounted Police and presentation of medals. 

10 a.m., great assembly of Indian tribes. 

1.30 p.m., luncheon with officers of Nofth-west Mounted Police. 

3.30 p.m., typical North-west exhibition. 

4.15 p.m., departure. 

The contingents from the different divisions began to congregate here on Sept. 19, 
and the camp, messes, (fee, were in readiness for them. Insp. Belcher with his troop 
from Edmonton being the first arrival. On the 21st Insp. Baker with troop from 
Maple Creek joined the camp. 

The Asst. Commissioner took over temporary command here on the Sept. 21, he 
was accompanied by Inspectors Wilson and Gilpin Brown. Next day the Regina quota 
turned up, and on the 23rd three troops from Macleod and Lethbridge under Superin- 
tendents Deane and Howe reached Calgary. 

It is some years since so large a body of police has been collected together and the 
few days remaining were employed in drill and escort work. It was very remarkable, 
in the first parade of the battalion, and evidence of good ground work, that they appeared 
to have been drilling together for months. 

Their Royal Highnesses arrived at Calgary at 10 a.m. and were met by a travelling 
escort under Insp. Baker, and the programme carried out. The after events were full 
of change, the inspection no sooner over than the returned South Africans had to parade 
for medals. Then a full royal escort was formed and a squadron sent to keep the 
grounds at the Indian assembly. 

In the afternoon a reduced royal escort for Vancouver and Victoria was detailed, 
and men and horses were on board the train by 6 p.m. Myself and ten constables of 
' E ' Division were included in this party. 

Lt.-Col. Biggar, staff officer in charge of medals stated the presentation of medals 
at Calgary went off without a hitch. Fifty-five were presented to members of the 
North-west Mounted Police and forty-five to civilians. Correspondence re medals has 
not ceased yet, I am continually receiving inquiries from all parts of the North-west. 

HEALTH. 

The health of the division has been good as will be seen by Acting Asst. Surgeon 
Rouleau's, report, which accompanies this. Several accidents, however, have occurred. 
Two men I had to send to Lethbridge to be under Dr. Mewburn, Constables Sheridan 
and Powell. The latter has returned after being operated on for rupture, and is fit for 
duty. 

Reg. No. 3581, Constable J. R. Huddle broke his leg whilst playing football on 
May 3. He was in hospital for six weeks, and his leg now is as good as ever. 

Reg. No. 3470, Constable R. G. C. Andrews hurt his knee whilst playing in a foot- 
ball match on April 24. He has never been able to use his leg properly since, and is 
now in Regina under Asst. Surgeon Bell's care. 

Reg. No. 3672, Constable L. McDonnell met with a serious accident whilst on 
patrol to the Beaver Dam. Whilst opening a gate he received a blow on the head and 
was picked up unconscious. How it happened no one knows, and he has no recollection 
of the event. . He remained unconscious for a week but is now, so the doctor reports, 
rapidly recovering. Asst. Surgeon Haultain, from Macleod, was sent here to assist Dr. 
Rouleau in this case. 

Reg. No. 3519, Constable S. S. Munroe is at present in the hospital with a broken 
collar bone, the effects of a runaway team. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT SANDERS 75 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Although there was a mild epidemic of small-pox to the North and South of us, I 
am thankful to say none of the division contracted anything worse than measles. 

TRANSPORT. 

The transport is in good order and has all been painted khaki as directed by gen- 
eral order. 

SADDLERY AND HARNESS. 

The saddlery and harness is in a good state of repair. We are fully equipped. 

FUEL AND LIGHT. 

The quarters and barracks are furnished with electric light, which gives good satis- 
faction. 

The fuel used, soft and hard coal has been of good quality, the former was supplied 
by the Alberta Railway and Coal Company, the latter by W. R. Hull. 

ARMS AND AMMUNITION. 

This division is armed with 45-75 Winchester carbines and the Enfield revolver. 
The ammunition supplied is of good quality and workmanship. 

ARTILLERY. 

Our artillery consists of two 7 pr. guns with their carriages, limbers, harness and 
everything complete. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The discipline of the command has been good. There are many temptations in a 
city like Calgary for the men, but they as a rule steer clear of them. It was necessary 
to dismiss one constable. 



GAME. 

Prairie chicken are more numerous this year than ever. Ducks were very plentiful 
in the early part of the season, but soon became vrild and very difficult to bag. Ante- 
lope are reported numerous in the Red Deer and Rosebud districts. 

The large number of new settlers in the northern part of my district are un- 
acquainted with the game laws and I have asked the Territorial Government to supply 
me with posters for distribution. This they have promised to do. 



RATIONS AND FORAGE. 

The rations supplied by the contractors, the H. B. Co., were of good quality. Oats 
were purchased locally and though a trifle light were good. Hay put up by the con- 
tractors passed the inspection of a Board of Officers and the Veterinary Sergeant, and 
was satisfactory. We purchased about 40 tons from the Sarcee Indians to keep us 
going through the summer, the price was lower than the contract. 



76 NORTH- WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

CLOTHING AND KIT. 

The supply of clothing has been good. I have had no complaints as to inferior 
quality. 

PATROLS. 

The detachments have constantly patrolled the district under their immediate 
charge. Other parts have occasionally been visited when I had men available. There 
should be a detachment of two men at the Beaver Dam, North-west of Calgary, one at 
Pekisko and another near the Red Deer River, north of Gleichen. 

The country south of the Blackfoot Reserve to the Little Bow should be frequently 
patrolled. 

In conclusion I beg to inform you that I have received excellent support from the 
Officers, N.C.O's and constables of my division, and I would specially bring to your 
notice Reg. No. 3056 Sergeant Major Belcher, who has performed his duties conscien- 
tiously and well. 

I have the honour to be sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

G. E. SANDERS, 

Supt. Commanding ' E ' Division. 

The Commissioner, 

N. W. M. PoHce, Regina, N.W.T. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT MORRIS 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



77 



APPENDIX F. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT MORRIS, COMMANDING 
DEPOT DIVISION, REGINA. 



The Commissioner, 

North-west Mounted Police, 
Reo^ina. 



North-west Mounted Police, 

Regina, Dec. 1, 1901 



Sir, — I have the honour to render my annual report for the year ended Nov. 30, 
1901. 

The duties performed by the men of Depot Division have been under the super- 
vision of Inspt.' Wilson, commanding Regina district, and will be reported by him. 

The Royal Visitors, whom we welcomed in Regina on Sept. 27 last, were almost on 
the eve of concluding a tour round the globe. 

The guard of honour furnished by the N. W. M. P. and commanded by myself, was 
a fairly representative one. His Royal Highness was good enough to call me forward 
on his leaving Regina and complimented me on the appearance and efficiency of the 
escort. 

recruits. 

The recruit drills were under the supervision of the Acting Adjutant, Sergt. -Major 
Church and Sergt. Hardy, than whom a more painstaking staff one could not well find. 
The musical ride, which I had the very great pleasure of commanding, attended the 
Brandon and Qu'Appelle fairs. The former on July 22 and the later on August 8. 

The conduct of the men in both places was very good and reflected much credit on 
themselves. The horses looked strikingly well, and courted close inspection and 
favourable comment from all. 

PHYSIQUE. 

The physique of the men is very good, the average being 5 ft. 9 in., and the chest 
measurement 38 in. The men are young, active and of good constitutions and well able 
to perform the arduous duties entailed upon thein. 

As a whole the men of Depot division are- strikingly creditable because of their 
sobriety and good conduct. No officer could desire to have a better lot of men under 
him. 

DISCIPLINE. 



The conduct of the division during the year was very good. 



TARGET PRACTICE, 

All members of the division went through the regular annual target practice with 
both carbine and revolver. When one considers the defective sighting of many of the 
carbines, one cannot well expect a very high shooting average. I have this to say how- 
ever, that the keen interest taken in rifle shooting this year, surpassed any previous 
experience, and was most gratifying to me. Indeed so keen was the interest in the 



78 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

division that I felt a longing desire myself to be on the range oftener than I could well 
attend. A preliminary course was instituted this year for the first time and it worked 
well. A maximum number of points had to be obtained at 100 yards before being 
allowed to fire at 200 yards, &c., and as every one was put on his mettle to qualify, 
better scores were made at the Annual practice. It did more, it created a spirit of 
emulation, which was pleasing to see. 

A new pattern of carbine and revolver is much needed. 

RATIONS 

The quality of the ration has been generally very good indeed. 
The butter ration, now that we have the creamery is a very great boon. 
The increased ration in the shape of dry fruit and canned vegetables, has been very 
much appreciated. 

FORAGE. 

The hay supplied during the year, was hardly an average owing to the wet season. 
A good sample of oats was obtained. 

TRANSPORT. 

Much of the transport is out of repair, but not beyond being put into good shape by 
the police artizans this winter. 

Beyond a few buckboards no new transport will be required, as quite a number of 
heavy and light wagons were supplied during the year. 

All transport has been painted khaki. 

SADDLERY AND HARNESS. 

New harness is much reeded as most of the black driving harness now in use 
requires constant repairs, as the leather has become defective from long usage. 

A brown leather four-in-hand set was purchased which as to appearance and 
durability leaves nothing to be desired. 

FIRE PROTECTION. 

What with the steam fire pump, hand engine, babcocks and water pails, we are well 
equipped for a fire. 

BARRACKS AND BUILDINGS. 

A new bridge was built across the creek on the Government house trail, quite a 
substantial structure, built on well driven piles, replacing the old bridge, which was only 
supported on sills which needed constant repairs after the ice flows in the spring. 

A new sidewalk was built in front of the barrack buildings. Some 90 acres of 
land were fenced in for a pasture field which has proven a great boon for horses 
requiring rest. 

The men's quarters are in good repair and comfortable, except the barrack rooms 
mentioned later on. 

New floors were put in the lower story of (H) block during the year and not 
before they were very much needed. 

Where necessary a considerable amount of painting and kalsomining have been done. 

The Assistant Commissioner's quarters have had a stone foundation placed under 
them, adding much to their appearance and comfort, no doubt. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT MORRIS 79 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

The Commanding Officer's quarters, and three or four others have been made fairly 
habitable, by being papered throughout. 

It strikes one as a great waste of money to expend it on repairs of most of the 
officer's quarters, so dilapidated and uninhabitable are they. The money that could be 
saved in the coal account alone, would more than make up an}'^ reasonable interest for 
money expended in erecting suitable structures. 

The stables have been refloored and kalsomined adding much to their appearance. 

GUARD UOOM. 

87 prisoners were admitted to the guard room during the year, classified as per 
attached list. 

The health of the prisoners incarcerated during the year has been exceptionally 
<i:ood. 



Crime. 



Theft 

Forgery 

Drunks 

Assault 

Vagrancy 

Lunacy 

Preferring false chaise. . 

Attempt to poison 

Wilfully killing dog 

Incest 

Rape 

Attempt to evade summons 

Passing counterfeit money 

Stealing ride on C. P. Ry 

Contempt of court 

Housebreaking. 

Taking hide from cow without per- 



Total 















P 




c 




as 


ao 


.„ 


^ • 


o 


1 




fR 


l\ 


^i 


-s 


"o.l 


o-d 

'e8 


■z% 


43 f5 


c 


dS 


6^ 


6< 




1 

19 
1 
9 


^ 


y-> 


^ 


7 
1 







12 








2 


7 


2 
14 

8 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

1 






1 
14 


1 

i 

7 i 
1 






1 






1 


1 






1 


i " 

1 














1 






1 
"'2'" 






1 

1 














1 






C5 


2 


3 


39 


21 



Average Length of 
Sentence. 



1 month. 

1 to 6 months. 

1 month. 

t month. 



5 days. 

$10 and costs and 14 days 



14 days hard labour. 



INDIAN ACT. 



Supplying intoxicants to Indians 

Drunks, &c 

Having liquor in possession , . . . 
Residing illegally on reserve ... 
Engaged in give':?way dance 

Total 

Grand totals. . . . ... 



7 
6 
2 
1 
6 


:::::. 





7 

6 
2 
1 
1 


1 

1 

'.WWW'S 


.... ^. 




22 


5 




17 


1 
1 


87 


7 


3 


56 


21 1 



3 to () months 
1 month. 
3 months. 
1 month. 
() months. 



GENERAL EQUIPMENT. 

The general equipment is good and sufficient for the division. 



80 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
CLOTHING AND KIT. 

The articles issued have been generally good, but we have had to condemn the 
issue of pea jackets and a goodly number of the riding breeches supplied on contract. 
The fur coats are in a very bad condition from fair wear and tear, many not being worth 
repairing. 

I would strongly recommend the issue of the blue cavalry cloak as in use in the 
Imperial Cavalry. 

LECTURES. 

Lectures were delivered daily on police and veterinary duties to all recent classes. 

HORSES. 

The horses purchased to replace those sent to South Africa are the best on the 
whole I have ever seen in any division. The health of the horses of Depot division 
during the past year has been good. There was one death from rupture the result of an 
accident in the riding school. Thirty-eight remounts were posted to this Division and one 
transferred from 'K' Division, making a total of 39 ; out of these one was cast and sold, 
one died and nine transferred to ' C ' Division, which leaves us with a gain of 28 as far 
as the remounts are concerned. Twenty horses and one pony were cast and sold. The 
mileage for actual patrols was 145,520, considering the number of escorts, (fee, which 
were furnished and were not shown on the mileage, I consider it very fair showing. 

DESERTIONS. 

I am pleased to say that only 2 desertions took place during the year'. 

CANTEEN. 

The profits accruing from the canteen go back towards a monthly mess grant, band, 
sports, &c. 

RIFLE CLUB. 

As in former years a rifle club was formed and with good results. The club 
concluded by a series of matches for prizes in cash and in kind. 

HEALTH. 

The health of the division has been very good. But I am sorry to have to report 
two cases of serious illness, Inspt. Wickham, of enteric fever, and Sergt. Burden, of 
hemorrhage of the lungs, both of whom are in the hospital now and making fair strides, 
however, towards recovery. 

CONCLUSION. 

While I think it invidious to particularize, yet I deem it but proper to bring to 
your notice the very creditable way in which Reg. S. M. Knight, Q. M. Sergt., Light 
aiid Vet. Sergt. Ayre have performed their duties. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

W. S. MORRIS, 
Supf., Commanding ' D ' Division. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR CUTHBERT 81 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



APPEl^DIX G. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF INSPECTOR A. R. CUTHBERT, COMMANDING 
'F' DIVISION, PRINCE ALBERT. 

Prince Albert, November 30, 1901. 
The Commissioner, 

North-west Mounted Police, 
Regina. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report for the year ending this 
date. I took over the command of the Prince Albert district on the 1st April last. 

GENERAL. 

The most notable feature of the year has been the very successful result of farming 
operations throughout the district, the yield of grain has been heavy, and the weather 
during the harvest operations most favourable. 

In a few locaHties the grain did not quite ripen and in some cases an otherwise fine 
crop of wheat was slightly affected by frost, but this has not affected to an appreciable 
extent the general favourable result of the year's operations to the farmer and to the dis- 
trict generally. 

Settlers, and especially the foreigners in the district are jubilant, and the only con- 
dition mitigating against the year's success is the low price of wheat. 

The more recently settled districts along the railway now resemble the prosperous 
farming communities of Manitoba, for many miles along the railway and extending far 
on both sides of it, in the district between Rosthern and Hague, stubble and stacks 
of grain may be seen as far as the eye can reach. 

This section is chiefly settled by Mennonites, and there can be no question of their 
intention to make their's a prosperous portion of the district, and of themselves a hard 
working farming community. 

In the above portion of the district alone the wheat crop is estimated at 800,000 
bushels, and oats 320,000 bushels from a total acreage of 40,000 under cultivation, the 
yield of wheat being 25 bushels to the acre, and oats 40 bushels. 

Much inconvenience, and some loss, has been caused by inadequate threshing 
facilities. 

Rosthern is the leading new town on the line of railway from a business and pro- 
gressive point of view. In addition to the five elevators at this point and others at 
stations along the railway it has been found necessary this year to erect an elevator at 
Prince Albert to handle the year's crop. 

The other settlements in the district at some distance from the railway, of old 
country French, Doukhobors, Galicians and Hungarians, show similar signs of success- 
ful farming operations and noticeable improvements. 

For some unaccountable reason, but perhaps owing to a series of short and compar- 
atively mild winters in the past, an insuflicient quantity of hay was put up last autumn 
by the more improvident settlers and in consequence there was a considerable loss in 
cattle last spring. 

Complaints and reports were constantly arriving from different sections that cattle 
were dying of some disease, in every case these reports were investigated and it was in- 
variably found that the cause of death was chiefly due to starvation. The lesson has 
not been lost, however, for notwithstanding the difiiculty of getting swamp grass this 
season owing to the swamps and sloughs being full of water, much hay has been put up, 
28—6 



82 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

and while it was thought early this autumn that the hay supply would be short and 
the price excessive, it is likely the supply will exceed the demand and the price not 
higher than usual. 

Owing to an abundant rain fall, and the already full condition of swamps and 
sloughs, many roads and bridges throughout the district were in an almost impassable 
condition for several months, some of the bridges, in fact, have not yet been repaired. 
Some patrols in early summer had to travel through a couple of feet of water long dis- 
tances over submerged roads usually high and dry. 

There has been considerable tj^hoid fever in horses in different parts of the district, 
all such cases when reported have been investigated by Yet. Staff Sergt. Mountford, 
who has in nearly every case found that the affected animals were watered from sloughs 
a few feet from stables and barns, in which the water was almost putrid and to which 
the stable drainage in many cases found its way. 

Six cases of glanders were found and the animals destroyed. There is a good deal 
of actinomycosis in cattle. It seems difficult to convince an otherwise intelligent man 
that an animal is suffering from a disease which is capable of being communicated to 
others, it is therefore chiefly through our efforts that diseased animals are discovered 
and through compulsion that they are isolated and treated. Notwithstanding our con- 
stant efforts I fear the disease is not decreasing. 

Many settlers have come into the district this year, and everything points to a still 
larger number next year. 

The several grist and saw mills of the district are always running full time and on 
the whole this community is a very prosperous one. 

The Canadian Northern Railway now being constructed has entered the Saskatche- 
wan district at its eastern extremity, work has been done on the right of waj'^ as far 
west as the Red Deer River, and the road is looked for in the vicinity of Prince Albert 
next year, its exact location here has not yet been settled upon so far as known. 

The following deaths have occurred in the district during the past twelve months: — 

In May last two boys were drowned off a raft in a slough near Osier. 

In September a Galician lad was shot and killed at Batoche by the accidental 
discharge of a shot gun in the hands of a companion. 

During the present month an old man named Alexis Robillard, while going through 
the bush across the river at Prince Albert, apparently lost his way, not returning to his 
home when expected, search was made the following morning and his body found near 
the remains of a small fire. Death was caused by exposure ; he was 89 years old. 

On the 19th July last, a report was brought to barracks that John Brown, an old 
resident of this neighbourhood, had" been found dead in his house near the South Fork. 
On investigation it was found that he had committed suicide by hanging, induced appar- 
ently by poverty and despondency. An inquest was held and a verdict in accordance 
with the facts rendered. 

On the 1st May last, J. D. Gillmore, also an old man and resident of Prince Albert, 
fell off the ferry in front of the town and, becoming at once helpless, was swept down 
by the strong current. Mr. Andrew Holmes, who saw the occurrence, jumped in and 
supported him until a footing was obtained on a bar further down the river from which 
both were then brought to land. Gillmore, although brought back to consciousness, died 
a few days afterwards from the effects. 

During the present month a young child of Mr. Anderson's, of Flett's Springs, set 
fire to her clothes while left in the house for a moment with another child, and was so 
burnt when discovered that she died within a few hours. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR GUTHBERT 83 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

CRIME. 

Below is a summary of cases arising, and dealt with, in the district and their 
disposal : 



Offences against religion and morals, &c. — 

Vagrancy 

Concealment of birth 

Causing a disturbance by being drunk 
Incest 

Offences against the person, &c.— 







'© 


OS 




c 


® 


O 


s 


-»3 


w 


•g 


a 


" 







3^1 



Rape. 



Assault 

Leaving holes in ice uncovered 
Offences against property, &c.— 

Theft 

False pretenses 

Destroying property 

Offences against Indian Act — 

Supplying intoxicants 

Drunk 

Having intoxicants on reserve . 
Animal Contagious Disease Act. . . 
Offences, N. W. Ordinances- 
Master and servants 

Liquor • 

Insanity 

Game 

Quarantine 

Profanation Lord's Day 

Stock 



Total . 



^ 1 

i ' 



91 



G9 ! 22 



There has been no complaint of cattle stealing, and no cases have come to our 
knowledge. 

It would perhaps be going too far to assume from this that no cattle stealing or 
killing has occurred, but if so the cattle have not been missed, or if missed, a settlement 
has been arrived at by the parties concerned without the aid of the law, satisfactory to 
them if not from a moral point of view. This is not unfortunately an uncommon way 
of settling such matters. It is undeniable that when a theft of cattle is concerned a 
resort to the law and its consequences is the last thing thought about, and this only 
after all other private and personal efforts at a settlement have failed. There is per- 
haps something to be said from the point of view of the owner, who prefers value for 
his animal rather than the uncertainties of a trial, which, whatever the result, is noth- 
ing in his pocket. A few head of cattle from time to time have been reported missing, 
but with the exception of two still astray they have been located or otherwise accounted 
for. 

This is however essentially a farming district, and there are no large herds of cattle 
and horses ranging about in uninhabited localities with little or no supervision as under- 
stood in the purely ranching districts. 

In reference to horses the case is somewhat different. While few horses are raised 
in the district, there is a large demand for them, and it is chiefly supplied by overland 
importations from west and south. It is not to be wondered at if some animals, for 
which lawful owners did not receive value, have found their way here. The difficulty of 
discovering such horses would be lessened if ranchmen invariably took the trouble of 
venting their horses when turned over. 
28—61 



84 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

In July last, some twenty horses were driven to Batoche, their brand being ' 96 ' 
on left thigh, they being not vented, and this being the brand of Messrs. Leeds & Elliott 
of New Oxley, the horses were pi^ima facie their property. I subsequently ascertained 
that they had been purchased in Montana, and entered at Maple Creek customs. 
Messrs. Leeds & Elliott were also communicated with to avoid the possibility of error. 

On June 13 last, the officer commanding at Calgary wired to look out for some horses 
which had passed Swift Current on May 1 1 for Prince Albert, this being followed by 
letter stating that these horses had been reported to be branded ' H ' (half diamond 
H) Mr. Robinson's of Calgary, and if so they were stolen. A list of the brands had 
been obtained some time previously on their arrival at Prince^ Albert, and the horses 
bore the ' H ' (half circle H) brand, Mr. Houk's, of Lethbridge, from whom they were 
purchased. 

At the present writing there is a somewhat similar case in hand which promises to 
end differently. 

In the month of July last, during the strike of railway trackmen, two attempts at 
train wrecking were made near Duck Lake by placing ties across the track, in both 
cases the obstructions were discovered by our patrols before they could do any harm, the 
offender has not been discovered. 

On May 12 last, Mr. Minton Mansell laid information against Edward Sanderson 
under the following circumstances : A considerable number of sheep had been sold by 
the complainant to Sanderson several months before, a mortgage on the sheep being 
accepted by Mr. Mansell as security for part payment. Mr. Mansell then went to 
South Africa as a member of the Strathcona Horse, returning in May when he discov- 
ered that Sanderson had gradually sold the sheep on which was the mortgage. Sander- 
son left Prince Albert for Regina by train the day preceding the laying of the informa- 
tion, his description, kc, were sent to Regina, but he appears to have been lost sight of 
there, and is still at large. 

On May 8, an information was laid against one Waller, who had already left by 
train for Regina, he being charged with passing a Confederate States $10 bill in pay- 
ment of an hotel account here. He was arrested in Regina and brought back here, but 
on trial it was not at all clear that he had been the one to pass the bill at the hotel and 
he was discharged. 

The above are the only known cases of crime occurring in the district for which the 
perpetrators have not been called to account. 



GUARD ROOM. 

The guard room at this post contains no prisoners, all civilian prisoners are sent to 
the Prince Albert Jail as soon as committed. 



INDIANS. 

The Indians as a class are a most peaceable and law-abiding people, they give no 
trouble apart from the few instances when they obtain liquor, and even in such cases 
they are no worse than the average white man in his cups. 

At the beginning of the year there was considerable drinking among the Indians 
about Duck Lake, who had been in the habit of obtaining liquor from half-breeds. 
Several convictions were had against the party selling, as well as the party buying, with 
resulting long terms of imprisonment and the effect was excellent. 

On John Smith's reserve, which is close to Prince Albert, there are also a few treaty 
Indians who do not appear to find much difficulty in obtaining liquor, they speak good 
English and can successfully pass themselves off for half-breeds, which in reality they 
are, some of these have had terms of imprisonment during the past year. 

The Sioux Indians in the vicinity of Prince Albert, not residents of any regular 
reserve, are hard working and earn their own living and give no trouble. 



REPORT OF IXSPECTOR CUTHBERT 85 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

The usual police escorts were furnished for the treaty payments, the trip to Green 
Lake, is a hard one on horses, especially in a wet season such as the last. 

Any mention of the Indians of this district and their condition would be incom- 
plete without a reference to the institution at Duck Lake for the training and education 
of the young Indians of both sexes presided over by the Rev. J. M. Paquet. It is difficult 
to overestimate the good this school is doing among them, and even among the older 
Indians who come within its influence. The reverend gentleman has always been noted 
for his energy and his remarkable influence over the Indians, and he has made of this 
school and grounds a beautiful spot as well as a real source of intellectual and economic 
advancement of the Indians. 

OUTPOSTS, PATROLS, ETC. 

The division has few outposts considering the extent of the district, and I am of 
opinion that more detachments should be established, provided the strength of the 
division can be increased. 

There are inhabited parts of the district that are seldom or never visited by regular 
patrols, as for instance Cumberland and the Pas. Complaints have recently been made 
in connection with the liquor traffic among the Indians, itc, at those places, if these 
reports are true, though they are of a general nature, there is a certain amount of mild 
lawlessness and depravity existing there at times that could be remedied by the presence 
of the police, and if not true the outc roping of such reports would be rendered impossible. 

A special patrol was sent to these points by canoe during the past summer of which 
a report has already been submitted, the patrol returned by steamer and train via Winni- 
peg. While no serious infractions of the law came to its notice there is no doubt that 
the presence of two or three men in that portion of the district permanently would have 
a good and desirable effect on the Indians and others. 

All accessible parts of the district are visited by patrols from division headquarters, 
or from the detachments as often as our limited numbers and other work of the division 
will permit. The patrols are much appreciated by Indians and settlers, and the wish is 
often expressed that they could be more fre^iuent. If we are to keep in touch with the 
rapidly increasing and largely foreign population of this district it would seem necessary 
at no very remote date to establish detachments in those localities now being settled. 

Patrols are very useful in their way, especially if frequent, but by this means alone 
it is not always possible to obtain that intimate knowledge of the people required for the 
more efficient carrying out of our duties. 

The men employed on detachment are comfortably housed, except at Batoche, where 
the buildings are in need of repairs. 

DISCIPLINE AND CONDUCT. 

The discipline of the division has been good. The most serious breaches have been 
under that clause of the Act which provides for intoxication however slight, and with 
one exception none of the offences were of a grave nature, the conduct of all ranks under 
all circumstances being excellent. 

HEALTH. 

There has been no serious illness. 

HORSES. 

Three horses have died during the year, one from a complication of diseases the 
result of influenza, and the others of typhoid fever, one of these was stationed at Batoche 
and undoubtedly contracted the disease from being watered in a slough which is some- 
times unavoidable on patrol. 



86 NORTH-WEST M0U2i TED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

The other was stationed at Prince Albert, and probably contracted the disease while 
on herd also from drinking slough water. Turning horses out where they could obtain 
slough water has been abandoned and only river water is now given them, since which 
there has been complete immunity from typhoid. There are six horses now on the 
strength which from age and other causes are of little use to us and they might be sold 
to advantage. The average cost of these horses was $108, the average age is 14 years, 
and service in the force 9 years, if disposed of now I think they would sell at about 
half original cost. 

The mileage returns of the division shows that the horses have travelled 75,338 
miles. 

SADDLERY, HARNESS AND TRANSPORT. 

The saddlery of the division has been in use many years but is still serviceable and 
in good condition. The wooden stirrups have been recently covered with leather which 
greatly improves their appearance. 

We are not so well off for harness, most of what is now in use is very old and often 
in need of repairs, one heavy and one light wheel set will be required during next year. 

The transport is in serviceable condition and sufficient in quantity, it has all recently 
been painted by a member of the division. As there are no specially employed artizans 
in the division, any needful repairs are done by local blacksmiths and carpenters. 

BARRACKS, REPAIRS, ETC. 

The following repairs to the Prince Albert barracks commenced last year were com- 
pleted during the present jesbY : Re-shingling all roofs, and placing stone foundation 
under main barrack building at a cost of $3,100. 

Placing stone foundations under the two houses occupied as officers quarters at a 
cost of $720. All the work was done by contract. 

A weigh scale supplied to this post some years ago was also erected by contract at 
a cost of $65, this will be a great convenience and more satisfactory to the vendor as 
well as ourselves when hay is purchased by the load. 

ARMS, AMMUNITION, TARGET PRACTICE. 

The old-fashioned Winchester carbine and Enfield revolver are the arms of the 
division. As the time must soon come when more suitable and modern arms will be 
supplied, it is needless to again refer to the peculiarities, already well known, of the 
above carbine and revolver, which have gradually outlived their usefulness. Special 
pains were taken with the practical instruction of the men, especially the younger shots, 
preparatory to, and during target practice. Every member fired the allotted number of 
rounds with carbine and revolver, the average score being for the former 162-64 and the 
latter 88-36. 

The ammunition was excellent and there were few 'miss-fires.' The Winchester 
ammunition is of American manufacture ; the Enfield, Canadian. 

KIT AND CLOTHING. 

These articles are of good quality, with the exception of the fur coats, which are 
constantly in need of repairs and soon get beyond the stage when repairs are of use. By 
•patching and stitching the old supply it is hoped to make them last through this winter. 

A quantity of the new pattern serges have been received but have not yet been 
taken into use. These frocks are a great improvement on the old pattern. 

RATIONS . 

The rations which are supplied locally under contract are of very good quality. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR CUTHBERT 87 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

FIRE PROTECTION, WATER SUPPLY. 

In addition to the existing appliances, consisting of pump, hose, &c., three addi- 
tional Stempel fire extinguishers were supplied to the division during the past year. 
These, on trial, were found very satisfactory. 

In the case of fire the water supply would be obtained from a well which, however, 
is unfit for any other purpose. All the water used for ordinary purposes is hauled from 
the river. 

PRAIRIE FIRES. 

Very few prairie fires have occurred and none of any importance. Exceptional 
care seems to have been exercised by the settlers and others and the result was very 
perceptible. Out of half a dozen small fires, five appear to have been started by sparks 
from railway engines, and the other was accidentally started by a Hungarian settler 
who has not yet been brought before a magistrate as no interpreter has been found. 

In two cases only was any loss involved, a small quantity of hay in stack being- 
destroyed, a portion of which was on One Arrow's reserve at Batoche, where, until the 
arrival of Corporal St. Denis, very little interest appears to have been taken in the fire 
and the prospect of loss thereby. 

DRILL, INSTRUCTION, ETC. 

As far as was possible, consistent with our other duties, both mounted and foot 
drill have been carried out. Every man had also a complete course of squad drill and 
single ride in the early summer. Detachments were relieved and brought in for the 
purpose. 

Lectures of a practical and elementary nature were given by Vet.-Sergt. Mountford 
on veterinary and kindred subjects, and instruction given by an officer on the duties 
and powers of constables under the N.-W. M. Police Act, in relation to the Criminal 
Code, North-west Ordinances, and Indian Act. 

CANTEEN AND DIVISION MESS. 

Notwithstanding the small volume of business done, the canteen is in a flourishing 
condition. Besides paying its running expenses, a monthly grant of $14 is made to the 
Division mess. This enables a very good mess being maintained with practically no 
further charge to the men, and to their entire satisfaction. 

The division had the honour of taking part in the duties consequent on the trip 
through the West of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and 
York, and this was greatly appreciated by all ranks. 

The usual assistance has been rendered to the Department of Agriculture, the 
Department of Indian Affairs, to the Coroner, and in attendance on the Supreme Court. 

Accompanying this report is a distribution state of the division, a return of cases 
dealt with in the district, and the report of Act. Asst.-Surg. Kitchen . 

The report of Yet. Staff-Sergt. Mountford has already been forwarded to Yeterin- 
ary-Inspector Burnett. 

I have the honour to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

A. ROSS CUTHBERT, 

Inspector, 
Commanding 'i^' Division. 



88 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



APPENDIX H. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF INSPECTOR J. O. WILSON, COMMANi ING 

REGINA DISTRICT. 

North-west Mounted Police, 

District Office, Regina, December 9, 190L 

The Commissioner, 

North-west Mounted Police, 
Regina. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith my report of the Regina district for 
the year ended November 30, 190L 

I took over command of Regina district on August 18, having been transferred 
from E Division, Calgary. My report, prior to the above date, has been compiled from 
data found in the office. 

general state of the district. 

From all quarters of the district reports of general prosperity are received. It can 
be said, without any exaggeration, that the past year has been the most prosperous in 
the history of the Territories. 

The unprecedented harvest has placed the farmers in a position to stand several 
bad seasons, should such follow ; but it is generally thought that we are now to be 
blessed with a succession of wet seasons. 

Land has increased in value with leaps and bounds, it is being eagerly sought after 
by settlers with capital from our neighbours to the south. 

The foreign settlers, including Icelanders, Galicians and Doukhobors, have done 
well and are rapidly becoming well off. They conform to our laws, and so far as I can 
gather are contented with life in this country. 

crime. 

The list of crimes is much larger than the previous year ; the percentage of convic- 
tions obtained is also larger. A little comment on some of the more serious cases will 
not be out of place here. 

Fiorentina Novaskosky, the Galician girl, who was committed for trial on charge of 
murder, by putting a poisonous mixture down the throat of an infant of her employer, 
was acquitted by Hon. Judge Wetmore and jury on the grounds that she was too young 
to understand the nature of her crime. 

Oke-mah-we-cappo, the Indian murderer, is still at large. He has several times 
been reported in the Moose Mountain country, and strong efforts have been made to 
effect the arrest, but, thus far, without success. 

John Morrison, the Moosomin murderer, paid the penalty for his awful crime on 
'January 17. He was hanged in the jail yard, Regina. 

The case of attempted murder, in which a box of poisoned herrings was sent by 
express to a man named Johnson, of Antler. Upon investigation it was found that the 
box had been sent by one Brown, while in Moosomin a few days previous. A warrant 
was issued, Brown arrested and committed for trial. Case was tried by the Hon. Judge 
Wetmore, who acquitted the prisoner. The evidence of the different witnesses did not 
correspond and complicated matters very much, although it clearly showed that the 
poison could only have been put in the box by either the prisoner or his accuser. His 
Lordship expressed his belief in the guilt of Brown, but owing to the want of sufficient 
evidence to establish it, he acquitted him. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR WILSON 89 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

The case of ' shooting with intent ' occurred near Broadview in May. The per- 
petrator of the crime, an Indian named Saget-ass-we-nin, made his escape before the 
pohce arrived, which was the following day, Corporal Quinn being notified by letter from 
Town Constable Ashe, of Broadview. The affray took place during a drunken brawl 
among the Indians, the victim being a squaw named Ete-kis-kne. The offender has been 
reported as being in different parts of the surrounding country, but all efforts to locate 
him have been fruitless. 

The case of attempted rape was a most daring crime, in which a man named Whalen, 
within two miles of Qu'Appelle, and in broad daylight, tried to commit the offence on a 
young lady whom he met riding a bicycle on the trail. He was strongly repulsed in his 
efforts to accomplish his wish, and had it not been for the arrival of several teams, more 
serious results would have followed. Staff-Sergt. Fyffe was absent from his detachment 
at the time, but on the following morning obtained a warrant and arrested the accused 
at the house of his cousin. He was committed for trial by magistrates McDonald and 
Millar, and is now in Regina jail awaiting trial. 

One case of carnally knowing a girl under fourteen years at Abernethy, in which a 
man had, on several occasions, by using very threatening language, had knowledge of a 
young girl who was afraid to tell her people of it. She finally plucked up courage and 
told her father, who laid the information and had warrant issued. Warrant was 
executed by Staff-Sergt. Fyffe and prisoner committed for trial. The trial takes place 
at Regina in December. 

Five convictions were obtained for horse stealing, four cases dismissed and five not 
yet tried. Of the latter, convictions are sure to follow in four, the other one is doubt- 
ful. For the convictions obtained, credit must be given to Consts. Crigan and Junget 
for the able manner in which they followed up the cases and brought the guilty parties 
to justice. 

Two of the prisoners not yet tried, namely, Roseblaff and Parisienne, are now in 
the custody of the U. S. authorities, awaiting extradition proceedings. These men are 
charged with the theft of two horses from L. G. Bell, of Qu'Appelle. It is largely owing 
to the good work of S. Sgt. Fyffe that they were traced and ultimately arrested. An- 
other one is being brought back from Fort Frances, Ontario, for the theft of a horse at 
Weyburn. 

Of the thirty-two convictions for theft, there are some of more importance than the 
rest. The manager of the Hudson Bay Co's. store at Whitewood reported the theft of 
small sums of money from the till in the night time. Suspicion rested on one of the clerks, 
but on careful investigation this proved to be w rong. Corpl. Quinn watched for several 
days and finally, while concealed in the store one night, caught the thief red-handed in 
the act of taking some money from the till. The prisoner, a labourer named Fisher, was 
committed for trial at Moosomin, was afterwards tried by Hon. Judge Wetmore and 
sentenced to one year with hard labour in Regina jail. 

One Wm. Miller was arrested at Whitewood on a charge of stealing $80 cash from 
a resident of Grenfell. Part of this amount was found on him when arrested, the bal- 
ance being accounted for by the purchase of some clothing. He was committed for trial 
and afterwards pleaded guilty before Judge Wetmore. From inquiries made it was 
learned that Miller had been connected with recent burglaries in Manitoba and had 
also served a term in prison, consequently he was sentenced to two years in Manitoba 
Penitentiary. 

James Mc Adam, committed for trial at Moosomin on two separate charges of theft. 
He was tried by Judge Wetmore and found guilty of both charges, but as the first had 
taken place in Manitoba, over which the judge held no jurisdiction, it was dropped. On 
the second one, he was sentenced to 1 year's imprisonment with hard labour. 

King vs. Motion, theft of |545. This case was the outcome of Motion receiving a 
bunch of horses to sell for another man and for which he failed to account. He was 
arrested at Lethbridge and brought to Regina for trial. Tried before Judge Richardson 
and jury, found guilty and sentf^nce deferred till March, when he was sentenced to one 
month with hard labour and fined $100. 

A. J. Reid arrested on charge of obtaining money by false pretenses When 
searched a bogus cheque was found in his pocket. For the first crime he was sentenced 



90 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

to one year with hard labour ; for the second one, six months. This prisoner afterward 
broke jail at Regina, was recaptured and sentenced to an additional year with hard 
labour. 

The two cases of perjury entered were the result of false evidence being given in a 
case tried under the Liquor License Ordinance. On the first, the presiding J. P's. failed 
to agree on a decision, one in favour of committal, the other acquittal. The evidence 
was laid before the Hon. Judge Wetmore, who stated that the accused should have 
been committed for trial, but as he had been petitioned to stop further proceedings, he 
ordered the whole matter be laid before the Minister of Justice. 

In the second case the defendant was proved to have stated what was false, but as 
he had been under the influence of liquor at the time, the case was dismissed. 

These two cases were tried at Wapella, the proceedings being taken by Corpl. Mc- 
Ilmoyle to put a stop to witnesses attending court in an intoxicated condition, much 
difficulty being experienced in getting straight evidence from witnesses in that town. 
Needless to say, this action had a very noticeable effect. 

In the five cases for escape from custody the prisoners were all recaptured by the 
police. One of these escaped from the Regina jail, taking with him a quantity of prison 
clothing, in the middle of the night. He was rearrested in the morning by Corpl. Saul 
Martin and a party from the barracks. 

Both cases of indecent assault were dismissed for want of sufficient evidence to sup- 
port the information. 

One case of vagrancy calling for mention was that in which Corpl. Quinn, unaided, 
arrested five tramps at Broadview, had them tried and sentenced to two months hard 
labour each, afterwards bringing them to Regina. 

The number of convictions for assault is more than double that of last year. A 
large nutnber of cases being among the foreign settlers in the Saltcoats District. 

The following is a classified summary of crime : — 

Classified Summary of Crimes in Regina District, Year ended Nov. 30, 1901. 



Crime. 



Corruption and disobedience- 
Obstructing peace otficer 

Misleading justice — 

Perjury 

Offences against religion and morals — 

Vagrancy , 

Drunk and disorderly 

Keeper of house of ill-fame 

Inmate of house of ill-fame 

Insulting language . 

Threatening language 

Disturbing worship 

Carnally knowing girl under 14 years . 
Offences against the person — 

Murder 

Attempted murder 

Threatening to kill 

Attempted rape 

Assault ... 

.. indecent . . 

II attempted 

Neglect to provide for family 

Offences against property — 

Horse stealing 



Cattle stealing. 
Theft 



Burglary 

Forcible entry. 



i 


m \ 


c 


"■5 


S ® 


> 




% 


^ 


o 


4 


4 


2 




17 


17 


77 


74 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 




1 




1 




1 




1 




83 


58 


2 




1 




1 


i 


1 14 


5 


1 2 




1 52 


32 


! 1 


1 


1 3 





Dismissed 

and 
not tried . 



2 dismised. 
3 

1 

1 awaiting trial, 

1 

1 
1 

1 awaiting trial. 
25 

2 

1 



5 awaiting trial ; 

4 dismissed. 
2 
6 awaiting trial ; 

14 dismissed. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR WILSON 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Classified Summary of Crimes in Regina District — Concluded. 



91 



Crime, 



-Con. 



Offences against property- 
Forgery 

Arson 

Trespass .... 

Damaging property 

Cruelty to animals 

Killing dog 

Poisoning horses 

Housebreaking 

Obtaining by fraud . . . 

Having bogus cheque in possession . 
Offences against public order — 

Indecent act in public 

Negligence causing public danger.. . 

Escape from custody 

Offences against Railway Act — 

Stealing ride 

Offences against Indian Act — 

Supplying liquor to Indians 

Indians drunk 

Removing timber from reserve 

Refusing to leave reserve 

Drunk on reserve 

Liquor in possession 

Neglect to send children to school. . 

Engaging in ' give-away dance ' 

Offences against N. W. Ordinances— 

Masters and servants 

Herd Ordinance 

Game Ordinance 

Lord's day Ordinance . .. 

Steam boilers Ordinance 

Prairie fire Ordinance 

Liqour Ordinance 

Insanity 

Fisheries Ordinance 

Medical Ordinance 

Pound Ordinance 

Estray animals , 

Noxious weeds 

Hawkers and pedlers 



1 


02 


-i 


s 






^ 


O 


s§ 


> 






c3 


o 


^ 


O 


1 




1 




4 


4 


12 


6 


3 


2 


1 


1 


2 




1 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


2 




1 




5 


4 


1 


1 


1 8 


8 


6 


6 


8 


8 


1 


1 


3 


2 


3 


3 


1 


1 


6 


6 


41 


25 


1 


I 


2 


2 


7 


7 


1 


1 


: 6 


6 


i 23 


22 


8 


8 


4 


4 


2 


2 


15 


8 


10 


7 


10 


6 


7 


7 


480 


358 



Dismissed 

and 
not tried. 



16 



122 



INDIANS. 



The Indians in this district, as a general thing, have been well behaved during the 
past year. There were only six cases of Indian drunks and three for ' having liquor in 
possession.' 

Six Indians of Pia-Pot Reserve who resisted arrest on warrants charging them with 
' engaging in a give-away dance,' were arrested in Regina and taken to Fort Qu'Appelle, 
where they were tried and convicted. Five of them were allowed to go on suspended 
sentence, the sixth one being sentenced to six months imprisonment with hard labour in 
Regina guard room. 

Chief Pia-Pot who was the ringleader in inciting them to resist arrest was sentenced 
to two months in Regina jail. This will have a general good effect among all the Indians 
in the district. 

Escorts were furnished the Scrip Commissioners when paying treaty through the 
country. 

All Indians found away from their reserves without passes have been sent back. 



92 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



DETACHMENTS. 

A detachment consisting of one IST. C. officer and one constable was established at 
Erwood in February for the purpose of looking after principally the sale of liquor to 
men employed on construction of the C. N. Ry. I am pleased to report the complete 
absence of crime and beg to submit the following extract from a letter of Mr. John 
McLaren engineer on the construction : — 

' I must say that in all my experience on railway construction, covering a period of 
twenty-four years, mostly in the western country, I have never seen matters run so 
smoothly and quietly, especially considering the diverse nationalities employed. I 
attribute this to the tact and firm attitude taken by the Mounted Police in dealing with 
the whiskey peddlers and rowdy element congregated here previous to their arrival, and 
making it so interesting for them that they were glad to disappear.' 

Up to date forty-one miles of clearing have been made and twenty-two miles graded. 
An average of 245 men have been employed on this work. Sergt. Haslett, who is in 
charge, reports everything running smoothly. 

Insp. Moodie took over command of Moosomin sub-district in July. 

Some of the horses on detachment were found to be old and unsuitable for further 
service. These have been sold and replaced by younger horses better able to do the 
work required. 

Some of the detachments were short handed during the royal visit, a number of 
men and horses were brought in for the royal escort. In some cases the men were 
replaced by specials, and horses hired to take the place of police horses. By this means 
the country suffered little owing to the absence of our men. 

The following table shows the number of men and horses employed on detached 
duty during the year : — 



Place. 


s 

i 


1 


1 


1 

OS 

s 
6 


i 


1 




Remarks. 


Estevan 


1 

1 










1 

2 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
2 


2 




North Portal.. . . 












Oxbow 




.... 




Moosejaw 

Regina (Town Station) 

Qu'Appelle Station 

Fort Qu'Appelle 




1 

i' 






1 
















Indian Head 










1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 

\ 

1 
1 

30 




Moosomin 






"i' 




Wolseley. . . . 




* ■ ■ 


IG 


1 




Grenfell 

Carlyle 

Yorkton . , . .... 










Saltcoats 




1 




Fort Pellv 








Woc^d Mountain 

Willow Bunch 


1 

\ 4 






Erwood. 


1 

4 


3 


C. N. Ry. construction. 



CROWN TIMBER DUTY— WINTER MONTHS. 



Roseau River . 




" 


. . - . 


2 

1 
1 

4 






1 

1 

3 




















... 




.... 

















Constable at Carlyle does timber duty at Moose Mountain in wmter. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR WILSON 93 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

CONDUCT. 

The conduct of the men in the district has been, on the whole, good. There were 
two cases of constables allowing prisoners to escape while in their custody. In both 
cases the prisoner was recaptured. 

QUARANTINE. 

Special report on the quarantine work done in the district has been made by Vety. 
Staff Sergt. Mitchell. 

INFECTIOUS DISEASES. 

Outbreaks of small-pox have occurred at Cottonwood, Touchwood Hills, Fort Pelly 
and Regina. Chicken-pox broke out among the Indians at Crooked Lakes Reserve. 
In all these places the quarantine has been enforced by the police, the disease confined 
to the first cases discovered, and no deaths were recorded. 

C.P.R. STRIKE. 

A number of our men were employed on this duty to prevent any breaches of the 
peace which were liable to occur. I am pleased to say there were no infractions of the 
law, the strikers conducting themselves in a very orderly manner. 



CUSTOMS. 

The N.C. officer in charge at Wood Mountain continues to act as customs officer. 
During the past year he has collected $3,755.95 duty. Duty was also collected on three 
bunches of horses brought into the district by Indians without reporting at Customs 
port of entry. 

In connection with this I would beg to point out the serious results which might 
follow the allowing of Indians to bring horses into the Territories without reporting at 
customs, and having them properly examined by a qualified veterinary inspector. 

First. — I have been informed by an Indian Agent that this practice interferes 
greatly with the civilizing policy of the Department, inasmuch as the Indians leave 
their reserves during the ^summer months when they should be employed in agricultural 
pursuits. They are also said to go to the United States where they can participate in 
' give away ' and other heathen dances, forbidden on this side of the line. 

Second. — The horses brought in by them are a very inferior class and deteriorate 
the value of horses in this country. 

Third, and the most important reason is the liability of bringing in glanders and 
other infectious diseases which would spread throughout the district. 

It would be impossible to carry out the quarantine regulations should this practice 
be allowed. 

A large number of settlers come in by way of North Portal, where all ^nimals are 
inspectedby a Vety. Staff Sergt. The following is the number of settlers entered 
during the year together with totals of stock brought with them : — 



Settlers 828 

Horses 3,021 

Cattle 3,221 

Swine 403 

Mules 105 

Sheep , 57 



94 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

PRAIRIE FIRES. 

Owing to the continued wetness of the first part of the season, no prairie fires were 
recorded. As the weather cleared up, however, fires commenced to break out, and during 
the months of October and November they were very much in evideuce, thirty-eight 
fires being reported and 10 convictions obtained. 

Most of these have taken place in the Moosomin and Estevan sub-districts, in 
the latter case several have come in from across the line. Several have been started 
by C.P.R. engines and section men along the line. Two of the convictions obtained 
were against section foremen : 

Referring to fires being started by railway engines :— -I am informed that the 
' spark arrester ' used on the Canadian engines is much coarser than those on the 
American engines to the south, consequently are more apt to start fires. 

Although the losses by fire have been considerable they are not as large as might 
be expected, when the small precautions taken by settlers to protect their property is 
taken into consideration. If it were not for the good work done by all ranks in 
promptly" turning out the settlers, the losses would, in some cases, be beyond estimation. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. O. WILSON, Inspector, 

Commanding Redina District 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR CASEY 95 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



APPENDIX J. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF INSPECTOR H. S. CASEY, COMMANDING 'K' 

DIVISION, LETHBRIDGE. 

Lethbridge, Nov. 30, 1901. 
The Commissioner, 

North-west Mounted Police, 
Regina. 

Sir, — I have the honour to render my report of ' K ' Division for year ending this 
date. 

GENERAL STATE OF THE DISTRICT. 

The past year has been the best for general results that this district has had. 
Although the irrigation ditch was completed and in good working order it was required 
very little, as we had a copious supply of rain during the past summer. 

There has been a great influx of new settlers in this district during the past year. 
They have fenced in about 2,500 acres and have broken about 1,000 acres of land. 

The irrigation company have started an experimental farm, about three miles from 
Lethbridge, under the management of Mr. Fairfield, who had recently managed an 
experimental farm for the United States Government in the State of Wyoming. Mr. 
Fairfield is an acquisition to the district, as he understands irrigation thoroughly. He 
has since purchased the experimental farm from the company. 

At Kipp's Coulee there are now sixteen new settlers who own about 2,500 head of 
cattle, 300 head of horses, and about 20,000 head of sheep. Most of these settlers will 
engage in farming on a small scale. 

At Chin Coulee there are three settlers who own in the neighbourhood of 500 head 
of cattle and 60 head of horses. They will do very little farming. 

There is a sheep ranche established at Verdigris Lake, and at Tyrell's Lake, there 
are three settlers who own about 500 head of cattle and 30 head of horses. 

On Milk River, between Mcln tyre's Camp and Kennedy's Crossing there are 41 
settlers who own 11,104 head of cattle and 855 head of horses. The principal owners of 
stock are Spencer Bros., 5,900 head, and G. P.Ashe, 1,140 head. A good many of 
these settlers will engage in farming. 

Magrath and Sterling are two prosperous villages of over 500 inhabitants each. 
They have churches, good stores and are generally thriving. 

Spring Coulee, the present terminus of the St. Mary's River Railroad, is a thriving 
settlement. Good crops are grown there. Fifteen new settlers are expected to arrive 
there shortly. 

Raymond is a newly started village between Sterling and Magrath. The village 
site is owned by Jesse Knight, a Mormon of wealth. They have at present a store, a 
livery stable and several residences and about 25 buildings in course of erection, which 
will be completed before winter sets in. Mr. Knight, to use a western phrase, is a 
' pusher. ' He has already purchased a large tract of land and is leasing several town- 
ships besides. He has broken, ready for crop next year, 4,000 acres of land. He has 
about 5,000 head of cattle, and 46,000 sheep. He has invested, so far this year about 
$325,000, and intends putting in a large sugar-beet plant at a cost of $500,000, which 
will be a large source of revenue to the producers of a product that cannot be shipped. 
It might not be out of place to give a few figures in connection with this industry. It 
will require to operate this factory 150,000 tons of beets, 22,000 tons of coal, 2,500 tons 



96 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

of coke, 120,000 barrels, or a like capacity of sacks, and miscellaneous material to the 
value of $15,000. It will employ 300 men, and will pay out in wages $125,000. It 
will pay to the farmer for beets $500,000, and the refuse, as food for live stock, will be 
worth $100,000. 

Lethbridge has improved greatly during the past year. Over 40 new substantial 
residences have been built, besides a new Baptist church in course of erection. The 
North-west Trading Co. have built a large store house and several of the merchants in 
town have had additions built to their stores. 

During the summer the corporation of the town has had planted along the irri- 
gated streets, 600 trees. 

SHEEP INDUSTRY. 

This industry has greatly increased during the past year. There are now over 
70,000 sheep in the district. The increase was good, being in some cases 90 p. c. There 
is likely to be a clash in the near future between the sheep-men and the cattle-men, as 
it is a well recognized fact that cattle will not range with sheep, nor will they drink at 
pools where sheep are in the habit of drinking. 

STOCK IMPORTS AND EXPORTS. 

There was imported from Manitoba and Ontario 4,515 head of cattle, principally 
stockers, and from the United States, 1,492 horses, 3,993 cattle, 12,619 sheep, 9 swine 
and 12 mules. With the exception of the sheep these were largely the property of 
incoming settlers. 

There was shipped from Lethbridge to Eastern points 5,954 head of cattle and 544 
head of horses. 

The stock on the ranges have done well. There was a very small percentage of 
loss last winter ; wolves were plentiful in the Milk River district and destroyed a 
number of cattle. 

STRIKE ON C. P. RAILWAY. 

On the 21st of June a strike was ordered on the C.P.R. by the trackmen. All the 
section men in this district went out. I kept a constable at St. Mary's station from 
June 21st until Sept. 22nd, when the strike ended. I kept the track continually pat- 
rolled in this district. There was no interference with the road-bed or bridges and 
small gangs of mostly unskilled men worked unmolested during the whole strike. 

SMALL-POX. 

On February 1 5th, one Stanley Morris, developed small-pox. The disease had quite 
a run here. Owing to the strict enforcement of the quarantine regulations there were 
only 15 cases developed and no deaths occurred. There were also three cases at 
Magrath. 

FIRES. 

On April 21, the blacksmith shop of Wm. Oliver, Mayor of Lethbridge, was totally 
destroyed by fire. Loss about $2,000. 

On May 8, Creighton & Sons foundry was destroyed. Loss, $1,000. 

On June 27, the livery stable owned by J. B Smith, of Macleod, and leased by 
Glass & Whitney, was totally destroyed by fire. Loss, $1,500. 

PRAIRIE FIRES. 

On August 27, a fire was discovered in the vicinity of Eight-mile Lake. I sent 
a party of police out and after several hours work succeeded in extinguishing it. 
Two ranchers lost respectively, 60 and 50 tons of hay. 

On October 5, another fire was discovered about 8 miles north-east of town. It was 
put out by the police. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR GASEY 



97 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



large tract of 



On October 19, a fire was started east of Brunton and burned a 
country along the south of Kipp's Coulee and across to Chinn Coulee. A rancher 
named Frank Steed lost 100 tons of hay. 

On October 21, a fire was started about 5 miles south-east of the town. A party 
of police put it out. 

A large tract of land in the Little Bow country has been burned over. 
I found it impossible to cope with fires at such a distance from the post as I had not 
enough men to send out. I have warned the new settlers to plough fire guards so as to 
protect their buildings. 

HALF-BREED SCRIP. 

Mr. McKenna, Scrip Commissioner, commenced issuing half-breed scrip here on 
October 21. In all he issued 51 scrip certificates and closed on October 28. The 
parties receiving scrip were largely from the United States. As high as |500 was paid 
for this scrip by some of the buyers, of whom there were twelve. 

H. R, H. THE DUKE OF CORNWALL AND YORK'S VISIT. 



Supt. Deane, one Sergt. -Major, two Corporals and sixteen men with 26 horses left 
on September 19 for Calgary to take part in the review in honor of the Duke of York's 
visit. 

CRIME. 

The following table gives a classified summary of the cases entered and convictions 
obtained during the year ended November 30, 1901 : — 



Crime. 



Offences against the person — 

Assault ; 

Attempted rape . , 

Offences against property — 

Cattle stealing 

Horse stealing 

Wounding a horse 

Wounding a dog 

Theft 

Wilful damage 

Receiving stolen property 

Highway robbery 

Offences against religion and morals- 
Vagrancy 

Drunk and disorderly 

Creating a disturbance 

Offences against the Indian Act- 
Supplying liquor to Indians 

Drunken Indians .... 

Indians having liquor in their possession 
Offences against the Railway Act — 

Stealing rides 

Offences against N. W. T. ordinance — 

Liquor ordinance . . . , 

Masters and servants 

Insanity 

Illegal branding 

Health ordinance 

Corruption and disobedience — 

Obstructing peace officer 

Escaping from custody 



28—7 



Cases 
entered. 



1 
2 
1 
1 

12 

10 

2 

1 

5 

23 
1 

3 
3 
3 



109 



Con- 
victions. 



15 



o 
23 

1 



Dis- 
missed 
with- 
drawn or 
not tried. 



3 ' 
3 I 



80 



26 



Remarks. 



Dismissed by Judge 
Rouleau. 



1 not tried. 



2 not tried. 
3 



98 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

You will notice that the foregoing table shows the number of cases entered to be 
109, as against QQ last year, an increase of 43. 

Some of the cases reported in which we have been unable to locate the guilty 
parties are as follows : — 

On the 10th day of January, two C.P.R. engines with tenders were derailed in the 
yard, caused by some parties opening a switch. Mr. Naismith, General Manager of the 
Alberta Railway and Coal Co. saw the man open the switch but it was too dark to 
follow him. Corpl. Lewis arrested two men on suspicion, but they showed clearly that 
they were not the guilty parties. A C.P.R. detective was sent here but failed to locate 
the guilty one. 

On October 6, one Yeaman reported having lost a watch from his room in the 
McKenzie House in Lethbridge. We still have hopes of locating the thief. 

On April 17, it was reported to me that a horse and saddle had been stolen 
from Spring Coulee. I investigated the matter and found we had a good case for extra- 
dition. A young man stole the horse and he being the son of a prominent Mormon in 
Idaho would have been easily traced. I reported the matter to the owner of the horse 
and he refused to have anything to do with a prosecution, giving as his reason that he 
had, at one time, been befriended by the young man's father. This is only one illustra- 
tion of the help we get to stamp out crime by those directly interested. 

We have had a great many cases of horse-stealing reported, which, on investigation 
showed that the horses had only strayed away. 

There is only one case, that knowing the thief, we have been unable to take action. 
This was the theft of a horse from Eldridge, of Magrath. The man who is accused of 
being the thief suddenly disappeared and we can get no trace of him. 

The case of rape, which w^as dismissed by Judge Rouleau, was committed on a little 
girl eight years old, by a German who had only been here a few days. There was no 
doubt of the man's guilt, but the judge thought the corroborative evidence was insufficient. 

The case of cattle stealing was one laid over from last year for want of a material 
witness. 

In the cases of theft it was found hard to make convictions, only two out of the 
eleven cases entered were obtained. The principal case of theft was Rex vs. Thompson, 
where it was alleged that Thompson had stolen ninety-seven sovereigns from a fellow 
passenger from England after their arrival in Montreal. William Boone alleged that he 
gave the money to Thompson, in Montreal, for safe keeping and never got it back. 
Thompson was discharged by Judge Scott. 

In the offences against the Indian Act, imprisonment was awarded in all the cases 
except one. In this particular case a half-breed from Batoche was fined 8100 and costs 
for supplying liquor to a Blood Indian. His friends paid the fine. 

The following cases will come up before the next sitting of the Supreme Court : — 
Rex vs. Coe, — Highway robbery. 

" Escaping from lawful custody (two charges). 

Theft. 
Rex vs. Hasson — Horse-stealing. 

" Illegal branding. 

Rex vs. Betts— Theft. 
Rex vs. Keabeary — Theft. 
Rex vs. Johnstone — Theft. 

In addition to the above an aj peal in two convictions made by myself against T. 
Percel and A. Baldwin will be heard. In these cases I fined the defendants T. Percel 
and A Baldwin $100 each for illegally branding a horse the property of one Joseph 
Schaffer. 

In the month of October, 1 900, some 30 horses belonging to Canadian settlers were 
stolen in Canada, driven to Great Falls in Montana and there disposed of. 

A notification to this effect came in the first instance to Supt. Deane from an officer 
of U. S. customs, Supt. Deane communicated with the collector of the U. S. customs at 
Great Falls with the result that the horses were traced. The county attorney of Cascade 
County and the Montana Stock Growers Association took the matter up and in June 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR CASEY 99 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

1901, a man named Frank Smith, was brought to trial in Great Falls on a charge of 
taking stolen property into Montana. The jury found him guilty and awarded him one 
year's imprisonment in the penetentiary. Smith claimed to be merely a hired man and 
the jury took this into consideration in the penalty they awarded. The main mover in 
the matter was one Percy DeWolf, who was eventually arrested by the U. S. authorities 
and was brought to trial at Great Falls on a charge similiar to that of Smith. On 
November 20, 1901 and the following days the jury after a short deliberation found 
the accused guilty and left his sentence in the hands of the court. The judge awarded 
him 10 years imprisonment in the penitentiary. By authority of Department of Justice 
Supt. Deane, attended both these trials, taking with him the necessary witnesses to prove 
the theft in Canada. 

The prosecution of these cases threw considerable expense upon the State of 
Montana, but the United States authorities generally expressed their pleasure in being 
able to contribute so materially to the maintenance of law and order along the Interna- 
tional Boundary Line. 

The relations between the U. S. authorities and the Mounted Police are of a very 
friendly nature. Supt. Deane, thankfully acknowledges the valuable co-operation he 
received from the then collector of U. S.- customs Mr. David G. Brown, and his inspector, 
Mr. A. E. Ringwald. These gentlemen have been associated with the police for some 
years, and it is due to their friendly assistance that the owners of the stolen horses were 
able to recover them. 

HEALTH. 

The health of the division has been generally good. Reg. No. 3274, Const. 
Mersereau, who met with an accident on July 2, 1900, thereby breaking his arm, is 
slowly recovering the use of the limb and he is able to be of some assistance in the Q. 
M. store. 

Reg. No. 3597 Const. Sheridan, was transferred from ' E ' division for medical 
treatment on April 17, and is still in hospital, but improving. 

On June 14, Reg. No. 3592 Const. Reed, was thrown from a remount, caused by 
the bit breaking and thereby loosing control of his horse. He sustained an injury 
which developed hernia and is still excused riding and heavy lifting. 

Staff-sergeant Brymner, dislocated his ankle at Coutts on July 30, and was in the 
Gait hospital until September 7. He has entirely recovered. 

INSPECTIONS. 

The usual inspections of the Post have been made during the year. I inspected 
Milk River detachments on January 5, and on April 17, and August 7 and 8. I ins- 
pected St. Mary's detachment on January 2, May 16 and July 15. The Milk River 
detachments have also been inspected monthly (with the exception of the month of 
August) by Staff Sergeant Brymner, who is in charge 

CANTEEX. 

Our canteen is in a good financial state. 

FIRE PROTECTION. 

We have a hose reel and 600 ft. of hose, the same size as is used by the town 
brigade. We also has two tanks in the barrack square, which are a part of the town 
system. The town have a steam and a chemical fire engine which are available in case of 
fire. In addition to this we have fire extinguishers and the buildings are all supplied 
with ladders. 
28—71 



100 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

DRILL. 

Most of the members of the division have been drilled and taught the use of the 
Lee Metford Carbine, the horses were put through a thorough course of training, taught 
to lie down, stand fire, and stand with reins thrown over their heads. 

TARGET PRACTICE. 

With the exceptien of two N. C. officers, all the members of the division have been 
put through the preliminary and annual practice, on the Macleod range. Considering 
the disadvantage of having to use for the first time, the Lee-Metford carbine, the shoot- 
ing was very fair. The revolver practice was not so good, although some good scores 
were made. It was a great inconvenience going to Macleod to shoot and took up a 
great deal of time. I hope to be able to get a good range near Lethbridge for next 
year. 

ARMS AND AMMUNITION. 

We have received from ' D ' Division forty Lee Metford Carbines. They are a 
much better arm than the Winchester. 

The revolvers we have are old and pretty well worn out, having been used a great 
deal for years on detachment. I found a number of them were useless on the range. 
We should have a lighter and more modern arm. 

The Lee-Metford ammunition was of good quality, but I cannot say as much for 
the revolver ammunition ; it fouled the revolver very much. 

TELEPHONES, 

We have a government line between here and Macleod, which we find it hard to keep 
in order. A new instrument is required at Kipp. This line is of great assistance to 
both ' D ' and ' K ' divisions. 

INDIANS, 

With the exception of the cases of drunkenness reported and one case of petty 
theft, the Indians have given us very little trouble. All cases, of Indians convicted of 
drunkenness have been awarded imprisonment. I do not believe that a fine in these 
cases is an adequate punishment nor does it have the same effect. In case of a fine 
most of the Indians can raise the money. 

Scout ' Peigan Frank ' has done good work in securing convictions. 

PATROLS, 

'^ ' Some patrolling has been done from the post, but not near as much as I would have 
wished, but I did not have the men. 1 would have liked to have kept up a constant 
patrol of the district as it is required now more than ever before. 

HORSE AND CATTLE DISEASES. 

There were one or two cases of black-leg reported as existing on Milk River, but 
on investigation the report was found to be incorrect. Several cases of mange were 
reported to be in Jesse Knights band. He is treating them. 

A case of equine syphilis was reported at Magrath on June 28, but on investi- 
gation it was found that the horse in question was all right. We have had no cases of 
glanders reported in this district. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR CASEY 



101 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



ROUNDS-UP. 



A N.C. officer or constable was detailed to accompany the principal round-ups in 
the district. 

MILEAGE. 

The total number of miles travelled by horses of the division was 96,173, 

DETACHMENTS, 

Owing to the Duke of Yorks' visit, the detachments were very short handed from 
August 13 to November 13. They all have now their full complement of men for the 
winter. 

The following table shows the number of N. C. officers, men and horses employed 
on detachment duty during the greater part of the past year : — 





1 

m 


1 
1 


5 


o 


1 






o 


Coutts 


2 






3 
2 
2 
2 

1 


5 
3 
3 
3 

1 
1 




Milk R. Ridge 





1 
1 
1 

" i 




Writing on Stone . . 

Pendant d'Oreille 

Magrath .... 






Town Patrol 














Total 


2 




4 


10 


16 


20 



This is the lowest number that would be of any use to do the work required. 
Patrolling has been well done, and a N. C, officer or constable has been constantly with 
the American round-up operating on this side of the line. Their duties were to see that 
no Canadian cattle were driven across the line and to generally look after the interests 
of the Canadian ranchers. This duty was well performed. 

The buildings are all in good shape for the winter. New hay corrals have been 
built at Milk R. Ridge and Writing on Stone and a new floor laid in the kitchen at 
Coutts. 

On July 9, the detachment at St. Mary's was closed and the constable in charge 
removed to Magrath, where we get board and lodging for man, and hay for horse, at a 
cost of $25 per month. This change was most desirable as Magrath is more centrally 
located for police work in that district. 

ASSISTANCE TO DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS. 

All instructions regarding assistance to the Department of Customs have been 
carried out. 

AMERICAN CATTLE. 



During the winter there were a number of complaints from settlers along Milk 
River of the number of American cattle ranging on this side of the line. I thoroughly 
investigated the complaints and ascertained that pretty much all of this country on the 
American side, north of the Marias and east of Sweet Grass Hills had been burned over 
by prairie fire. The cattle men on the Marias drove about 16,000 head of cattle north 



102 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

of the Sweet Grass Hills and posted six line riders there to take care of them. I might 
here state that on an average there is about ten or twelve miles of American territory 
north of the Sweet Grass Hills extending east and west for about 30 miles. On this 
ground the cattle were intended to be herded. Bands of these cattle drifted north to 
Milk River and the cattle belonging to small ranchers mixed in with them. It kept 
the settlers busy herding their cattle away from the American bands. 

I wrote to W. S. Prenitt, secretary of the American Stock Association, and as a 
result, he sent three additional line riders, one each posted at Pendant d'Oreille, Writing 
on Stone and Coutts, to assist the settlers. I have not heard of any Canadian cattle 
being lost west of Milk River Ridge. The grass was burned off for some distance 
north of the line, and during a storm in Januar}^ nearly all the cattle around there 
drifted into the United States, where they wintered, and in the spring assistance was 
given the Canadian ranchers to round-up and secure their cattle. 

A line fence was spoken of, but in my opinion it could not be maintained without 
great expense. 

IMPROVEMENTS TO THE POST. 

About 250 young maple trees were sent from Regina and planted, but not as large 
a proportion of them lived as I would have liked. 

I sowed some maple seed, and they are doing well, having grown about 18 inches 
this year. The roads around the square have all been graded and put in good repair. 
We have a complete system of irrigation, and if we can get more trees I have no doubt 
as to our making them live. 

HARNESS AND SADDLERY, 

The harness in the division is all old. We received sixteen new. saddles and, 
condemned and sold fifteen. We have enough to meet the requirements of the 
division. 

HORSES. 

There are at present in the division 49 horses; team, 19, and saddle, 29, and one 
pony. 

RATIONS, FORAGE, FUEL AND LIGHT. 

H. Bentley & Co., of Lethbridge, have all the contracts for rations, excepting 
flour. They have also the contract for the supplying of oats. The flour is supplied by 
the Hudson's Bay Co. The rations are of good quality. 

The hay at the detachments, excepting at Milk River Ridge, was put up earlier this 
this year than heretofore, and as a result we have a better quality. The contractor for 
hay at Milk River Ridge failed in his contract and forfeited his deposit. Mr. Brown, 
who put up the baled hay in the post, delivered two car loads at Milk River Siding for 
Milk River detachment at the same price as that he delivered at the post. We had 33 
tons of loose hay stacked in the post by the Indians of the Blood agency. It was very 
satisfactory, as they completed the stack in two days. 

We use the Gait coal, and light is supplied by the Electric Light Company of 
Lethbridge. Although more expensive than coal oil, it is much safer and is a far better 
light. 

In conclusion I would state that during my ten years, service in Southern Alberta, 
I have never seen the time when police were more required than at present. 

The strength of the division is, and has been, inadequate for the police work required 
in this district. 

I herewith enclose estimates for the current year. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

H. S. CASEY, Inspector, 

Com. ' K ' Division. 



REPORT OF ASSISTANT SURGEON HAULTAIN 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



103 



APPENDIX K 



ANNUAL REPORT OF ASSISTANT SURGEON C. S. HAULTAIN. 



The Commissioner, 

North-west Mounted Police, 



MACLEOD, December 1, 190L 



Regina. 



Sir, — I have the honour to forward herewith the annual sick report of ' D ' Division 
for the year ended November 30, 1901. 

The health of this Division during the past year compares favourably with any other 
since I have had medical charge here, there being no enteric fever as during the period 
of railroad construction. 

The most serious cases treated in this hospital have been civilians. 

On January 27, two foreigners who had been fighting in a box car with axe and 
knife were brought to the guard room. These men had been in the employ of the C.P.R. 
Co., and each had a large sum of money concealed upon him. A. Venere was taken to 
the hospital with seven stab wounds, one penetrating the lung and admitting air into the 
chest-wall, and another in the groin, causing the protrusion of seven inches of boweL 
Having attended to these injuries I turned my attention to the other man who was less 
seriously hurt, and whom it was necessary to treat in the guard house. His injuries 
were from the axe and consisted of broken i-ibs with air entering into chest-wall, and 
broken bones of the hand. These cases both made a good recovery. 

On October 1 3, E. Castonguay, a lunatic, was admitted from Blairmore, being handed 
over to me at the train by Dr. Malcolmson, the Macleod general hospital being unable to 
undertake such a case. He had a very severe self-inflicted throat wound, extending 
from the ear into the windpipe. With the aid of Staff-Sergt. Heap this wound was 
sown up on his arrival at the hospital, and I was able to send him off to the Brandon 
asylum on November 5, as his delusions still persisted, and he was unfit to be at large. 
These cases have been reported in full. 

Early in the year we had a slight epidemic of la grippe, but with the exception of 
my own case they readily yielded to treatment. After a severe illness I left for Cali- 
fornia on April 9, and the medical duties were performed by Dr. Forbes. During this 
illness I received every consideration from those in authority, and unremitting attention 
from Dr. Kennedy, and must place on record the devotion of Staff-Sergt. Heap, to whom 
my recovery was largely due. 

Since my return off leave, several cases of importance have occurred, though I am 
pleased to say none of a contagious nature in barracks. 

On September 29, I was summoned to Okotoks where inspector Davidson had been. 
taken ill on the way to Calgary, and he returned the next day with me by train. 

On November 1, while at Lethbridge for the purpose of holding a Medical Board, I 
was hastily recalled to the Kipp detachment, where constable Hay had received a wound 
through the leg by the accidental discharge of his pistol, which had dropped from the 
holster. I took him into the Post the next morning, and he is now doing light duty. 

On November 23, I went to Calgary to assist in the serious case of constable Mac- 
donnell, who had been thrown from his horse and was still unconcious when I arrived. 
All these cases have been reported upon in detail. 

A mild type of small-pox was epidemic in the spring, but no member of this division 
contracted it. Vaccination and other precautionary measures were of course taken. 

Part of the hospital badly needs good flooring and some new window-blinds might 
be purchased. We now expect to get the invalid chairs that have been so much needed 
in the past. 



104 NORTH-WEST MO Cf NT ED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

The hospital has recently been supplied with quilts, towels, sheets, pillow-cases and 
clothing for daily and nightly use of patients, and they are most acceptable. 

The barracks have been regularly inspected and kept in a clean, sanitary condition. 
The bath-room and wash-room have received their share of paint and general improve- 
ment, which adds much to the comfort of the men. 

The iron cots recently received for the barrack-roonis are a great boon. 

The drugs have been supplied as heretofore by R. B. Barnes in such quantities as 
may have been required. Their quality and promptness of delivery has always been 
good, but some of the prices high, and we are now negotiating for a fresh tender from 
Young, the only other druggist in Macleod. 

Since my return I have had occasion to visit some of the detachments, viz., the 
Leavings, Mosquito, Mosquito Creek, Kootenai, Big Bend, Stand-Off and Kipp. Some 
of this travel has been by night and has shown the necessity of the surgeon knowing 
the trails when wire-fencing and new teamsters and river crossings at night are apt to 
seriously delay the arrival at his case or destination. 

I am glad to say there has been no change in the hospital staff this year, and I 
think the economy in rations, washing, &c., has been closely attended to, and the work 
willingly and satisfactorily performed. In this post the duties of the hospital staff are 
at times arduous, as for instance, the care of lunatic prisoners, and at the same time the 
daily calls for minor matters are numerous. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

C. S. HAULTAIN, 

Assistant Surgeon. 



REPORT OF ASSISTANT SURGEON HAULTAIN 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Annual Sick Report for the year ending November 30, 1901. 



105 



Medical Cases. 

Sore throats 

Colds and coughs 

Feverish colds 

La Grippe 

lironchitis 

Rheumatism, muscular. . . 

II inflam 

Myalgia 

Diarrhcea 

Biliousness . . 

Gastritis 

Intestinal colic 

Functional heart disorder . 

Pyrexia 

Enlarged liver 

Tsupe worm 



Surgical Cases. 



Bullet wound 

Sore finger 

Lymphangitis 

Otitis 

Odontalgia 

Flesh wound 

Fracture of clavicle , 
Sprains and strains . 

Contusions 

Bruises 

Hemorrhoids 

Orchitis 

Admitis . 

Gonorrhoea 

Secondary syphilis. . 
Abrasion of cornea. . 

Ophthalmia . . 

Conjunctivitis 

Snow blindness 

Cellulitis 

Tonsilitis, follicular . 
Excision of tonsil. . . 



Number 
of 

Cases. 



Prisoners and Civilians. 



Scrofula 

Fracture of ribs. 



Cut throat 



metacarpal bcme 



Lumbago 

Cellulitis 

Blistered heel. 

Strain 

Biliousness . . . 
Hemiplegia. . . 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
7 
1 

15 
3 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 



Number 

of 

Days. 



2 
15 

4 

100 

34 

5 
15 

4 
16 
12 

6 
17 

1 
55 

4 



20 

2 

46 

4 

1 

8 

35 

19 

22 

38 

10 

35 

11 

54 

29 

3 

1 

1 

2 

2 

41 

6 



46 
26 
15 
24 

3 
11 

2 
32 

2 
12 



Average 

Duration 

on Sick 

Report. 



Surgeon's Remarks. 



1 

1^ 
4 

ll 

15 

1 

It 

6 
5i 

274 
4 



29 

2 
46 

4 

1 

8 
35 

2f 

22 

3 

17 
11" 

18 
29 

3 

1 

1 

2 

2 

f 



46 
26 
15 
24 

11 
2 

32 
2 

12 



Recovered and returned to duty. 



Still under treatment. 
Recovered and returned to duty. 



Released from guard room. 
Recovered. 

Recovered and sent to Brandon 

Asylum. 
Recovered. 



Released ; sentence expired. 



C. S. HAULTAIN, 

Assistant Surgeon. 



106 N0RTH-WES1 MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



APPENDIX L. 
ANNUAL REPORT OF ASSISTANT SURGEON G. PEARSON BELL. 

Regina, December 10, 1901. 
The Commissioner 

N. W. M. Police, 
Regina. 

Sir — I have the honour to submit the annual medical report of Depot Division for 
the year ended November 30, 1901. 

The total number of cases treated was 384, and the average number on daily sick 
report 7 "40. The number of admissions was 203, with an average duration of each case 
of 9-97 days. There were no deaths during the year. 

Of infectious cases, there was 1 case of Enteric fever, probably contracted on out- 
post duty, which proved to be of a severe type ; 1 case of Rubella, and 9 admissions for 
Influenza, all however, mild in character. 

Injuries : A severe case of fracture of the humerus extending into the elbow 
joint, required treatment for some time, but the man eventually recovered with a very 
useful arm. Two cases from South Africa, one a bullet wound of the back, the bullet 
being embedded in the spine, the other a fracture of the thigh with faulty position. 
The former case was invalided, the latter taking his discharge. A case from another 
division, of abscess of the abdominal walls, following operation for appendicitis, was 
in hospital for a long period, but finally recovered and was returned to his post for duty. 
There were also numerous cases of sprains, contusions and less severe injuries. 

A table is attached showing the cases of sickness arranged according to the various 
diseases. 

Invaliding : The number invalided during the year was 16. Of these 5 occurred 
in Depot Division, the causes being rheumatism, 2 cases, debility, 1, joint-disease, 1, 
and tubercle of lung, 1 ; the remaining 1 1 were from other posts. 

Owing to the presence of small-pox in the neighbourhood, all members of the divi- 
sion were vaccinated. 

There were 51 applicants examined for engagement, and 31 non-commissioned officers 
and men for re-engagement, in addition to a number of recruits for the South African 
Constabulary. 

The sanitary condition of the Post has been good, but the pit system of latrines 
which still exists in some quarters should be abolished. 

The guardroom was visited daily and a number of civilian prisoners treat-ed, one 
being at present in hospital suffering from catarrhal pneumonia. 

The hospital requires painting throughout, inside, and the heating arrangements 
need improving. Stoves in each ward are necessary in cold weather in addition to the 
furnaces, the consumption of coal is excessive, and yet it is very frequently impossible to 
keep the wards at the necessary temperature, especially for cases of diseases of the 
respiratory organs. I think better results would be obtained if the heating was done 
by a hot water system in addition to a stone foundation being placed under the build- 
ing ; this is much needed as the sills are completely decayed. 

Staff-Sergent Hayne has performed his duties in a highly satisfactory manner. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

G. PEARSON BELL, 

Assistant Siirgeon. 



REPORT OF ASSISTANT SURGEON BELL 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Annual Sick Report for Year ended November 30, 1901 



107 



Disease. 



Abscess 

Adenitis 

Alcoholism 

Appendecitis 

Biliousness 

Boils 

Bronchitis .... 

Burns and scalds . . 

Carious teeth 

Chafes 

Colic 

Conjunctivitis 

Constipation 

Contusions 

Coughs and colds 

Corns *. 

Debility 

Diarrhoea 

Dislocations — Shoulder . . ^ 

" Head of fibula > 

1 1 Unreduced' shoulder . J 

Eczema . . . . 

Electric shock 

Erysipelas 

Exostosis of thigh. . , 

Febricula 

Fever, enteric 

Fractures— Old thigh . . 

" Humerus and elbow joint 

.1 Clavicle 

11 Metacarpal bone 

Frost-bites 

Gastric catarrh 

Gout 

Hsemoplysis 

Hfeuiorrhoids 

Headache 

Heart, valvula disease of 

M irritable 

Hemiplegia 

Hernia 

Herpes 

Hordeolum 

Hydrocele ... 

Imported cerumen 

Injurie; 

Influenza 

Joint disease— great toe 

Lumbag o 

Migraine 

Myalgia 

Neuralgia . . 

Orchetis 

Otitis 

Painful stumps — toes 

Pleurisy 

Pulmonary tuberculosis 

Rheumatism 

Rubella 

Sore — feet 

I! thi'oat. 

Stricture of Urethra 

Syncope 

Synovitis 

Tape worm 

Tonsilitis 

Ulcers — Penis venerial 

M Veldt sores 

Vaccinia 

Varicose veins 



Number 
of 

cases. 



4 

1 
2 
1 

10 
5 
7 
2 

13 
5 
1 
5 
5 

38 

81 
1 
5 

34 



5 
1 
1 
1 

11 
1 
] 
1 
1 
1 
5 
4 
1 
1 
2 

12 
1 
1 
2 
4 
2 
1 
1 
2 

23 
9 
1 
5 
1 
8 
7 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

12 
2 
2 
5 
1 
3 
2 
1 
5 
1 
1 
8 
1 



Number 

of 

Days. 



212 
22 
13 
30 
13 
57 

TOO 
42 
13 
18 
1 
17 
5 

194 

193 
1 

110 
45 

50 

17 

8 

10 

13 

55 

40 

40 

150 

20 

14 

10 

4 

5 

11 

75 

18 

77 

21 

95 

54 

7 

1 

3 

2 

73 

55 

100 

25 

2 

9 

20 

43 

1 

25 

13 

20 

100 

33 



10 
3 
3 
39 
3 
27 
4 
8 

17 
25 



Average 
Duration. 



53 
22 

05 



Surgeon's Remarks. 



14-28 




21 




1 




30 




1 




3-4 




1 




51 




2-38 




1 




22 


(3) Invalided. 


1-32 




18 


(1) Invalided. • 


3-4 




8 




10 




13 


Invalided. 


5 




40 


Still in hospital. 


40 


Di&charged. 


150 




2(5 




14 


Still on light duty. 


3 2 




1 




5 




11 


Still in hospital. 


375 




1-5 




77 


Invalided. 


21 




47-5 


(1) Invalided ; (1) Light duty. 


13 5 


(1) Invalided. 


3-5 




1 




3 




1 




3 17 


(1) Old bullet wound invalided 


01 




100 


Invalided. 


5 




2 




1125 




2-85 




43 




1 




25 


Invalided. 


13 




20 


Invalided. 


13-3 


(3) Invalided. 


10-5 




3 


^ 


2 




3 


Invalided. 


1 




19-5 


(1) Light duty. 


3 




5-4 




4 




8 




50 




25 





108 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



APPENDIX M. 
ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTING ASSISTANT SURGEON F. H. MEWBURN. 

Lethbridge, December 14, 1901. 
The Officer Commanding 

' K ' Division North-west Mounted Police. 
Lethbridge. 

Sir, — I have the honour to present the Annual Medical Report of ' K ' Division 
North-west Mounted Police for the year ended November 30, 1901. 
During the year forty-nine cases have been treated. 
The number of sick days has been thirteen hundred and forty-six. 
The cases are shown on the attached classification. 
Five men have been examined for re-engagement. 
The division has been vaccinated. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

F. H. MEWBURN, 

Act. Asst. Surgeon. 

CLASSIFICATION OF DISEASES. 



Suraical. 



Appendicitis 

Orchitis 

Co-fract. and dislocation of ulna and 

co-f ract. of radius 

Contusions 

Paronychia 

Syphilis . ... 

Traumatic flat foot 

Wounds of face 

Wounds of fingers. 

Eczema 

Herina Pbl. Inguinal 

Articana 

Dislocation of ankle 

Sub-acute synovitis 

Tinea Circinnatse 



Medical. 



Tonsilitis 

Diarrhcea 

Bronchitis 

Neuralgia, facial 
II spinal. 

Coryza 

Myalgia 

Constipation. . . . 
Cephalgia 



Number 

of 
Cases. 



Total. 



Number 

of 

Days. 



49 



47 
21 

365 

11 

11 

33 

160 

4 

47 

1 

239 

2 

40 

2 

2 



25 
26 
17 

5 
259 

4 
21 

1 

3 



Average 
Duration. 



1,346 



Days. 

47 
21 

365 

21 

11 

33 

160 

4 

15§ 

119^ 
1 

40 

1 
1 



4* 

^ 

17 

IS 

259 
2 

H 



Remarks. 



Recovered ; returned to duty. 



Still under treatment. 
Recovered ; returned to duty. 

Still under treatment. 

Improved. 

Recovered ; returned to duty. 



I Still under treatment. 
Recovered ; returned to duty. 



F. H. MEWBURN, 

Actg. Asst. Surgeon. 



REPORT OF ACTING ASSISTANT SURGEON AYLEN 109 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



• • APPENDIX K 

ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTING ASSISTANT P. AYLEN. 

N. W. M. Police, Fort Saskatchewan, November 30, 190L 

To the Officer Commanding 

' G ' Division, N. W. M. Police. 

Sir. — I have the honour to submit to you the annual sick report of ' G ' Divison 
iov the year ended this date. 

There were 248 cases treated at this hospital, viz.: 150 police and 92 prisoners. 
You will observe this is a very large increase over last year's number of cases. There 
were also five lunatics confined in the guard room this year under my observation, while 
waiting to be transferred to a lunatic asylum. 

As previously stated, the guard room is too small for its requirements, being 
altogether unsuited for a prison, there being practically no ventilation, and very imper- 
fect heating. Considering the large number of prisoners undergoing punishment at this 
post, a more suitable building should be provided. I have no doubt the guard room is 
accountable for the large increase of sickness among the men and prisoners of this post. 

One prisoner Couteurville, was released from imprisonment on account of illness. 
He contracted a severe attack of pneumonia phthisis, and was in a very critical condi- 
tion for about two weeks. 

The sanitary conditions of the barracks has been very good. The hospital building 
requires repairs badly, also the interior of the hospital requires to be kalsomined and 
painted. 

I inclose herewith a detailed statement of cases treated during the year. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

P. AYLEN, 
Acting Assistant Surgeon. 



110 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
Annual Sick Report for the year ended November 30, 1901 



Disease. 



Police. 



Abscess - . 

Orchitis 

Contusions 

Biliousness . . . . 

Crauips 

Dysentery 

Influenza 

Wounds (lacerated) 

Colds (bronchial) 

Colds (feverish) . 

Sprains.. 

Strains 

Ademtis .... 

Rheumatism 

Gonorrhoea 

Constipation 

Dislocation (shoulder) 

Lumba§;o 

Laryngitis 

Diarrhoea 

Tonsilitis 

Boils 

Sore arm (from vaccination) . 

Inflamed gums 

Nephritis 

Hemorrhoids 

Ear ache 

Corns 

Debility.... ... 

Varicose veins 

Bronchitis 



Number 

of 
Cases. 



Prisoners. 



Rheumatism 

Biliousness . 

Colds (feverish). 

Colds (bronchial) 

Laryngitis 

Lumbago 

Contusions 

Constipation ., . . 

Toothache 

Strain 

Sprains 

Rash 

Earache 

Influenza . 

Bronchitis 

Pneumonia 

Cramps.. 

Wounds (lacerated) . 

Varioloid 

Eczema 

Dysentrj 

Tonsilitis 

Lunatics imder observation. 



2 
1 

13 

10 
9 

12 
8 
6 

33 
9 
2 
3 
1 
5 
1 
3 
2 
2 
5 
6 
4 
3 
3 
1 
3 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 



Number 

of 

Days. 



9 
21 
57 
14 

9 
10 
49 

no 

39 
31 



18 
9 

35 
3 

36 
3 
9 

10 

12 
4 

23 
2 
5 
9 
2 

10 
1 
2 
6 



10 

10 

12 

14 

9 

4 

6 

7 

5 

6 

7 

1 

6 

2 

7 

43 
7 

17 

147 

1 

14 

1 

60 



Average 
Duration . 



Days. 



4i 
21 

4^ 

If 

1 

1 

6i 
18i 

ItV 

2§ 

4 

3 
10 

If 
35 

1 
18 
li 

i| 

3 
1| 

2 
1§ 



i| 

21 
l| 
1* 

14 
li 
i| 

n 
1 

7 
1 
2 
2 
7 
43 
1 

21 

1 

1* 
1 
14 



Surgeon's Remarks 



Recovered and returned to duty. 



Recovered. 



1 under treatment in hospital and 4 
in guard room. 



P. AYLEN, 

Acting Asst. Stirgeon. 



REPORT OF ACTING ASSISTANT SURGEON KITCHEN l\\ 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



APPEI^DIX 0. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTING ASSISTANT SURGEON E. C. KITCHEN. 

Prince Albert, November 30, 1901. 
To Officer Commanding 

'F' Division, N.W.M.P. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the annual report of ' F ' Division, for the year 
ending this date. 

No. of cases treated during year 8 — all members of force. 

No. days off duty, 148. 

No. days in hospital, 9. 

One transfered to Regina with recommendation to be invalided, all the others 
treated made a complete recovery. 

The general health of the officers and men of the Division for the year has been 
exceptionally good. We have been free from all infections and contagious diseases. 

All the members of the force here were vaccinated together with their families. 

Ten of the force were examined for re-engagement. 

Five examined for Yukon. Three examined for S. A. Constabulary. 

The sanitar}^ condition of the buildings and grounds is good. 

The drugs, &c., supplied the division have been most satisfactory. 

Inclosed find detailed statement of drugs purchased and cases treated during the . 
year. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

E. C. KITCHEN, 

Acting Assistant Surgeon. 



112 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
Annual Report of Sick in Barracks at Prince Albert, year ending November 30, 1901. 



Disease. 



Chapped hands 

Cold 

Toothache 

Peritonitis 

Sprained ankle 

Frozen Toe 

Bronchitis 

Cystitis 

Sprained Muscles 

Frostbite 

Acute Alcoholism 

Sore throat 

Ingrown toenail 

Sprained knee 

Sore eyes 

Headache 

Indigestion 

Epistakis . 

Constipation 

Rheumatism 

Lumbago 

Bruised testicle 

Inflamation of muscles from vac 

cination ...... 

Colic inflammation 

Caries of teeth , 

Biliousness 

Neuralgia 

Ulcerated tooth . . 

Dementia (civilian) 

Ulcerated mouth 

Intercostal Neuralgia 

Boils 

Bruised Ankle 

Diarrhoea 

Bruised Muscles. 

Belivis Colic 

Colonitis 



Number i Number 

of ; of 

Days. 



10 



Average 
Duration . 



25 
1 



Remarks. 



Medicine and duty. 

Recovered and returned to duty. 

Medicine and duty. 

Recovered and returned to duty. 

II II 

Medicine and duty. 
Recovered and returned to duty. 
Transferred to Regina. 
Medicine and duty. 

II 
Recovered and returned to duty. 

Medicine and duty. 



Recovered and returned to duty. 

Medicine and duty. 

Recovered and returned to duty. 

Medicine and duty. 

Recovered and returned to duty. 

II II 

Medicine and duty. 



Recovered and returned to duty. 
Transferred to jail. 
Medicine and duty. 



Recovered and returned to duty. 



E. C. KITCHEN, 

Acting Assistant Surgeon. 



REPORT OF ACTING ASSISTANT SURGEON ROULEAU 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



113 



APPENDIX P. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTING ASSISTANT SURGEON E. H. ROULEAU. 

Calgary, November 30, 1901. 
To the Officer Commanding 

' E ' Division N. W. M. Police, 
Calgary. 

Sir, — I have the honour to present you with my annual sick report for the year 
ending this date. 

In reviewing this list, you will find, notwithstanding the number of cases, there 
were very few serious ones, such as : concussion of the brain, broken leg and collar bone 
(clavicle), internal dise^-se of the ear. All accidental cases, except the last named (ear- 
ache.) During the visit here of His Royal Highness the Duke of Cornwall and York, 
our men remained under canvas for over a week, during very unfavourable weather 
indeed, but, I am happy to say, there was very little sickness amongst them, only a few 
cases of diarrhoea and a couple with influenza. 

The sanitary condition of the barracks is very satisfactory. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

E. H. ROULEAU, M,D. 



28—8 



114 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
Annual Sick Report 'E' Division, November 30, 1901. 



Disease. 



Biliousness 

Bruises 

Blood poisoning (finger). 

Colds (various) 

Diarrhoea 

Dyspepsia 

Cephalalgia 

Cholera (gastro-enterite) 

Chafes 

Chest trouble 

Congested kidneys 

Concussion brain 

Constipation 

Effects of vaccination . . , 

Earache 

Eczema 

Exostosis 

Gonorrhoea 

Gleet 

Gastralgia 

Hoemorrhoids 

II Internal... 

Kicks from horses 

Jaundice . . . . 

LaGrippe 

Lumbago . . 

Measles. 

Nettle Rash 

Neuralgia 

Orchitis ... 

Prolapsus Recti 

Pharynigitis 

Punctured wounds 

Incised wounds 

Swollen groin (bubo). . . . 

Tonsilitis 

Testicles injured 

Sprains and strains 

Rheumatism. 

Retention of urine 

Sore throat 

Synovitis.. . , 

T oothache . . 

Fractures 

Leg 

Clavicle 

Dislocation of shoulder. , 



Number 

of 
Cases. 



4 

10 
1 

26 
3 
3 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
5 
2 
1 
3 
1 
5 
2 
2 
1 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
2 
9 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 



Number 

of 

days. 



7 

72 

15 

44 

5 

6 

4 

2 

20 

5 

38 

' l' 

7 

100 

1 

15 

41 

6 

9 

15 

ioo 

10 

55 

11 

20 

6 

5 

96 

2 

3 

2 

29 

13 

20 

21 

65 

169 

7 

17 

87 

5 



87 



Average 
Duration. 



If 

n 

15 

f 

10 

5 

38 



1 

7 

100 

1 



41 
6 

)\ 

33j' 

10 

11 

5i 
10 

6 

1§ 
32 

2 

3 

2 
29 



24 



87 



Surgeon's Remarks. 



Returned to duty. 



Still under treatment. 
Returned to duty. 

Not fit for police duty. 
Returned to duty. 
Sent to Regina. 
Returned to duty. 



Sent to Regina. 
Returned to duty. 



Sent to Lethbridge 
I Returned to duty. 



Const. Ambrose at Banff. 
Returned to duty. 

Sent to Regina. 
Returned to duty. 

Returned to duty. 
Still under treatment. 



* Not under my care. 



E. H. ROULEAU, 

Act. Asst. Surgeon. 



REPORT OF ACTING ASSISTANT SURGEON BLOUIN 115 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



% 



APPENDIX Q. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTING ASSISTANT SURGEON A. BLOUIN. 

Battleford, November 30, 190L 
The Commissioner, 

North-west Mounted Pohce, 

Regina. 

Sir, — I have the honour to forward you my annual medical report for the year 
ending this date. 

During the year there were 122 cases treated in this hospital ; of these 101 were 
members of the force, 20 were prisoners and one, a destitute half-breed. 

I examined 2 staff sergeants, 1 sergeant and 3 constables for re-engagement, also 
8 constables for the South African Constabulary. 

The health of the Division, in general, was good. 

One death occurred. 

On May 4, I was ordered to Onion Lake Detachment to attend Reg. No. 1353, 
Constable Lucey suffering from cystitis with retention of urine and subsequent uremic 
poisoning, of which, he died on the 17th. I was detained at Onion Lake until the 
22nd on duty as health officer in connection with the small-pox epidemic, and had to 
make another trip in the first week of June in the same capacity. 

The sanitary condition of the men and barracks have been excellent. The proof of 
it is the fact that the epidemic did not reach this post or Onion Lake detachment not- 
withstanding the exposure to contagion the men's duties entailed. 

The drugs supplied have given satisfaction and a shipment of articles for the use of 
hospital patients just received will fill a long felt want. 

Since March last, I have been without the assistance of a Hospital steward. In 
cases of emergency this would prove very inconvenient, not to say more as there is not 
one man in the post who knows even the rudiments of nursing or first care to wounded. 

I enclose detailed statement of the cases treated during the year. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

A. BLOUIN, 

Act. Asst. Surgeon, 



28—8^ 



116 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
Annual Sick Report of 'C Division, November 30, 1901. 



Disease. 




Number 

of 

Days. 



Average 
Duration. 



Surgeon's Remarks. 



Abscess 

Biliousness 

Blistered feet 

Bronchitis 

Cold 

.1 feverish 

Constipation 

Cramps 

Chafe....... 

Conjunctivitis ... 

Cystitis and Uremia . 

Diarehoea 

Gastralgia 

Gastric disturbance . , 

Inflamed joint , 

n gums. . . 

Ingrowing toe nail . . 

Indigestion . 

Influenza 

Laryngitis 

Lumbago 

La Grippe 

Neuralgia . 

Nervous prostration. 

Odontalgia 

Otorehea 

Pleuresy 

Rheumatism 

Strained back 

Sprained ankle 

Wounds, contused . . 

It incised 

II punctured . 



Prisoners. 



Gonorrhea and bubo. 

Cold and cough 

Indigestion 

Influenza ... 

Intercostal neuralgia. 

Odontalgia 

Strained back 

Syphilitic ulcers 

Wound, gunshot 



DestitiUe Half Breed. 
Crushed ankle 



1 
4 
1 
3 
7 

13 
5 

14 
3 
1 
1 
6 
1 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
4 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
4 
3 
2 
3 
1 
1 



4 

12 

3 

24 

7 

31 

4 

16 

12 

1 

13 
9 
6 
3 
5 
7 
4 
3 
7 
1 
4 

33 

7 

4 

5 

1 

21 

16 

27 

15 

18 

2 

4 



30 
5 
4 
4 
3 
1 
10 
37 
8 



41 



4 
3 
3 

8 
1 

4 

4 

1 
13 

I' 

1 



4 

U 
1 
21 
4 
9 

7i 
6 
2 
4 



30 
1 
1 
4 
3 
1 
2 

37 
8 



41 



Recovered. 



Died at Onion Lake. 
Recovered. 



Extractions and Duty. 
Recovered. 

One case under treatment. 
Recovered. 



Extraction and work. 
Returned to work. 
Improving on light work. 
Recovered and removed 
to Regina. 



Removed to his friends 
quite recovered. 



A. BLOUIN, 

Act. Asst. Surgeon. 



REPORT OF ACTING ASSISTANT SURGEON DEANE 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



117 



APPENDIX R. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTING ASSISTANT SURGEON R. B. DEANE. 

Maple Creek, December 3, 1901. 
The Officer Commanding, 

North-west Mounted Police, 
Maple Creek. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the annual medical report of ' A ' Division for 
the year ended November 30, 1900. 

The entire number of cases treated was 142, of these 100 were members of the 
force and forty-two were prisoners. 

The division has not enjoyed quite the same immunity from infectious disease as it 
did during the preceding year, but, notwithstanding, the incidence of communicable 
disease was slight if varied. 

Of infectious disease, epidemic parotitis was brought to barracks during the early 
part of the year from the village, where this disease was prevalent. The patient was at 
once isolated, and the disease, consequently, kept from spreading. 

In the beginning of this year there were some three cases of influenza, which, as 
their average duration shows of five and one-third days, were not of a severe type and 
no sequelae followed. 

On October 9, Reg. No. 3280, Constable Willis, H. R., following his return from 
Calgary, developed enteric fever. The case was of a mild form and convalescence was 
uninterrupted, the patient remaining in hospital upwards of five weeks. In this connec- 
tion I have much pleasure in recording my appreciation of the efficient manner in which 
Reg. No. 3674, Constable Hanlon, J. J., performed his duties as hospital orderly during 
this period. 

Owing to an outbreak of variola in the town and district in the latter part of 
December, and the three following months, the whole division as far as possible was 
vaccinated where necessary, and the town was placed ' out of bounds ' during the period 
of its quarantine ; no case, I am glad to say, occurred amongst members of the force 
here. Reg. No. 3543, Constable McCuish, however, stationed at Medicine Lodge De- 
tachment, contracted the disease and made a good recovery ; he was treated at Medicine 
Hat. 

In September there were several cases of epidemic enteritis due to some climatic 
condition, as the complaint was general in this district. 

On June 14, Reg. No. 3446, Staff-Sergt. Coristine, D., while at target practice 
sustained an injury by the bursting of a shell, whereby, I regret to say, he practically 
lost the sight of one eye. I had him under treatment for some two weeks, but as his 
improvement was so slow, I recommended his being sent to consult an oculist in Win- 



nipeg 



which was done. 



Two men were transferred to Regina during the year for the purpose of being in- 
valided, viz.:— Reg. No. 3869, Const. Rowd, S. H., for an oblique inguinal hernia com- 
plicated by varicocele, and Reg. 3484, Const. Letoile, J. J., for varix of the legs ; both 
men declined operation. 

Eight men were examined for service in South Africa, three for engagement in the 
force, two for re-engagement and one for service in the Yukon. 

In May, the building hitherto occupied as a hospital was given over for officer's 
quarters and the hospital removed to the building formerly used as sergeant's mess and 
quarters. This house although not quite as spacious as the former hospital, answers the 
purpose fairly well and meets all necessary requirements at present. 



118 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



The barracks are inspected by me weekly and a written report on their condition 
forwarded to the officer commanding. 
I append a list of the cases treated. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

REGINALD B. DEANE, M.D. 



Diseases Treated in the North-west Mounted Police Hospital, Maple Creek, during the 

year ended November 30, 1901. 



Disease. 



Alcoholism 

Blistered foot 

Colds 

Coughs 

Colic... 

Coccydynia 

Cephalalgia 

Conjunctivitis 

Chalazicn . 

Concussion, chest . , . 
Contusion, foot 

ti elbow joint 

ir shin 

II eyeball. ,. . 

Dyspepsia 

Diarrhoea 

Dislocation of shoulder 

Enteric fever 

Febricula 

Gastritis acuta . 

Gingivitis 

Hernia 

Influenza 

Lumbago 

Lymphadenitis 

Neuralgia 

Orchitis parotidea .... 

Pleurodynia 

Parotitis epidemica. . . 

Pharyngitis . . 

Paronychia .... 

Rheumatism. , 

Sprain, wrist 

II back 

thigh 

Tenosynovitis 

Tonsilitis 

Wound of foot 

II face 

II hand 

Vaccinia 

Variola 

Varix 



Number 
of 



Number 

of 

Days. 



6 
2 

10 

6 

5 

3 

4 

2 

1 

.5 

6 

8 

24 

60 

16 

16 

5 

38 

13 

7 

1 

36 

16 

8 

3 

2 

10 

40 

6 

1 

1 

14 

1 

1 

3 

19 

8 

1 

4 

1 

3 

38 

12 



Average 
Duration. 



6 
1 

1 
1 

1* 

3 

1 

1 

1 

5 

6 

8 
12 
60 

If 

If 

5 
38 

2# 

7 

1 
36 

If 

3 

2 
10 
10 

6 

1 

1 

3i 

1 

1 

3 
19 

i 

4 
1 
3 

38 
12 



Remarks. 



Recovered. 



Removed. 
Recovered. 



Returned to duty. 
Recovered. 



Transferred to Regina» 
Recovered. 



I Transferred to Regina. 



REGINALD B. DEANE, M.D. 



REPORT OF VETERINARY SURGEON BURNETT 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



119 



APPENDIX S. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF VETERINARY SURGEON J. F. BURNETT. 



MACLEOD, December 20, 1901. 



The Commissioner, 

North-west Mounted Police, 
Regina. 



Sir, — I have the honour to submit this my annual report for the year ended Nov. 
30, 1901. 

So much of my time having been taken up in inspecting stock for shipment it was 
impossible for me to visit all the divisions of the force, ' C ' and ' F ' being the two 
missed. 

The months of September, October and November being particularly busy ones, 
the exportation of cattle and horses and the importation of sheep kept both Staff Sergeant 
Eraser and myself continually on the move, and it was only by travelling night and day, 
and every day of the week, that we got through without causing any delay to the 
shippers. 

The general health of the horses throughout the force during the j'^ear has been re- 
markably good, but I regret to say that we lost two from enteric fever. This may 
not appear very alarming, but it may mean that, in a season particularly favourable 
to the development of the bacteria which causes the fever, our loss would be very much 
greater. My opinion is that the habitat of the germ is the sloughs and the wells in 
the vicinity thereof, and the hay cut from around them becomes contaminated, and the 
infection is transmitted to the horses. To drain the sloughs in the vicinity of ' F ' 
division barracks and detachments would not only be useless but expensive, as our horses 
are fed and watered at so many different places and the disease appears to be pretty 
well distributed over that section of country surrounding Prince Albert. 

I also thought of recommending that the division be supplied with pressed hay from 
the south, but came to the conclusion that this plan would not only be useless but might 
produce a sense of security that would be false should it happen that no outbreak did 
occur in a season when the plan was carried out. Another plan, one which will not incur 
extra expense, and by which, if carried out, I hope to see the number of cases reduced 
to a minimum, is the sending of nothing but aged horses to that division. Horses 
ranging in age from ten to thirteen years could be drawn from Depot, 'A,' ' E,' ' D ' and 
' K ' divisions to supply the wants of ' F.' My reasons for suggesting and recommending 
this plan is that old horses are not nearly so prone to contract the disease as are the 
younger animals. Another point in its favour is that the loss of an old horse would not 
be considered as great as that of a young horse. 

Several outbreaks of influenza have been reported, all of a mild type with the ex- 
ception of the outbreak which occurred at Coutts detachment about the end of Novem- 
ber. The disease was of a very severe type, but no deaths resulted from it. A peculiarity 
of this outbreak is that none of the horses from Milk River Ridge and Writing on Stone 
detachments contracted the disease, although they had been continually coming in con- 
tact with the affected animals. 



120 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
Summary of cases treated during the year ending November 30, 1901. 



Respiratory System . 
Circulatory n 
Nervous n 
Digestive n . 
Tegmunitary h 
Lymphatic m 
Locomotorv .i 
Wounds .. , 

Total... 



333 



This includes saddle or collar galls. 



With reference to the shoeing, a change for the better is noticeable, some of the 
blacksmiths employed in the force having improved wonderfully in their work and take 
a great deal of pains to do good work. The outside blacksmiths cause more or less 
trouble in shoeing the detachment horses. No matter what instructions are given them, 
or what promises they make, they as a rule fall back to their old style. 

The plan adopted in this division is to injure the foot as little as possible in 
shoeing, for it must be remembered that every slice taken off the sole with the knife, 
every scratch of the rasp on the wall, and every nail driven, injures the foot to a certain 
extent. To reduce this injury to the smallest possible degree, I have the foot levelled with 
the rasp, and the shoe made large enough so that it is not necessary to rasp the wall 
down to the shoe, and use the smallest nails consistent with the weight of the shoe. I 
have given this method a thorough trial and find that it is the best for the horses of * D ' 
Division. This is not a new system by any means, but is the system followed by the 
best blacksmiths the world over. 

As nothing has yet been brought out that will take the place of the iron shoe, nor 
is there any probability that there will be, the leading blacksmiths appear to be devoting 
their whole attention to the shoeing of horses in the most scientific manner, that is, their 
aim is to give the foot the protection it requires without causing inconvenience or pain 
to the horse, and as little damage to the foot as possible. 

With regard to the use of pads while I am not prepared to condemn them 
altogether, as I believe in certain cases they will prove useful, I do not think it wise 
to tack them on to every horse that goes lame. With the system of shoeing as practiced 
in ' D ' Division, I have not found it necessary to resort to pads, and if there is a spot in 
the North-west Territories trying to horses feet, I think we have it in Macleod and vicinity. 
My objection to the indiscriminate use of pads is that they may hide for a certain length 
of time an impending danger, whereas if other treatment were followed complete cures 
might be effected. 

REMOUNTS. 

Points throughout the whole of the Territories where it was thought possible to 
secure a suitable horse for the force, were visited after sufficient notice had been given 
through the columns of the local press and by poster, thus giving every horse-owner in 
the country an opportunity of offering his stock. Of course, a great many were shown 
that were totally unfit for service in the force on account of their size and conformation, 
and a considerable number had to be rejected on account of their age and unsoundness. 
While we secured our number, I doubt if we could have purchased twenty more of the 
stamp required. 

In the selection made I am satisfied the force got the pick of the country. This is 
not my opinion alone, but the opinion of disinterested judges who have had the oppor- 
tunity of inspecting the remounts at different points, and who witnessed the parade in 
Calgary during the visit of H. R. H. the then Duke of York. On this parade the most 
of the horses used were purchased within the past two years, about one-half of these 
being remounts, and of the latter were horses that had been running wild on the prairie 
six weeks before. That our horses looked well and acted well on this occasion no one 
present will question. 



REPOR T OF VET ERIN A RY 6 URGEON B URNETT 121 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

The horses offered this year were, as a class, a little better than those of last, but I 
don't mean by this that any improvement in the breeding is noticeable, but to the fact 
that greater care was taken in selecting the horses to be offered, and more attention 
paid to the breaking and fitting, the better prices paid the past two seasons being 
accountable for the change. 

While the horses purchased are a good serviceable lot, and some of the number 
being exceptionally fine animals, there is still room for improvement, but prospects for 
anj^ change for the better do not look particularly bright, and I would again urge upon 
the government the necessity of taking some action in this matter. Two good stallions 
in this district would prove of inestimable value to this part of the country. 

My reasons for again alluding to this subject are : There are two classes of light 
horse breeders in the country. One class, perhaps the most numerous, are perfectly 
satisfied with conditions as they exist if they can bunch off their horses at $40 or $50 a 
head ; they are well pleased and don't seem to see that it would pay them better to raise 
fewer horses, and get $100 a head for them. This class think any stallion good enough. 

The other class are mostly young men, men who own only small bunches of mares. 
While they are anxious to breed the best they feel that they cannot afford to buy 
first class stallions, for should anything happen to such a horse, it would give them a 
set back they would not recover from for years. Some will of course say why did 
not these men avail themselves of the opportunity to buy the horses picked in England 
by Col. Dent, and recommended as being the best, to cross with native mares for the 
purpose of getting army remounts ; these horses having been put up at auction at 
Calgary. I did not see those horses but have been informed by different parties that 
in their opinion the horses were too light, if such is the case, I could not blame the 
breeders for not wanting them, for I believe one of the hardest blows the breeding of 
light horses ever got in the Territories was through the use of light thoroughbreds. I 
am finding no fault with Col. Dent, the horses he sent out I have no doubt would have 
answered well if crossed with big English mares, but there is a vast difference between 
them and our native mares. 

I would advocate the use of good stallions on the Indian reserves as a possible 
solution of the Indian pony stallion problem, for I believe the Indians would be only 
too glad to have the services of such horses at their disposal, and would in consequence 
ha\-e their colts castrated as yearlings for their own protection. 

The supply of horses bred in the country has been nothing like equal to the demand, 
consequently large numbers have been brought in from the States lying south of us. As 
might be expected a number of breeders on this side object to the importation of Ameri- 
can horses, fearing that it might injure the breeding interests of the Territories, so far 
no harm has came from this course, but on the contrary a number of ranchers and 
horse dealers have done a very profitable business in these American horses. As the 
country is settling up very fast the demand for horses is becoming greater every year, 
and our horse breeders are not keeping pace with the times, even the few horses shipped 
to South Africa the past two years has caused such a scarcity of saddle horses that 
cattle men have had to go to the Indians for their cow horses. 

Instead of the importation of these American bands of horses checking or injuring 
the breeding interest of the country, I am of the opinion that it will result in good, for 
in nearly every band brought across are a number of first class mares, and as these 
mares are sold principally to farmers they will be kept in the country and used for 
breeding. This I consider a decided advantage to the country, as good mares are none 
two numerous, even the Indians appear to have grasped this fact for they will not part 
with their best mares, great as the demand is for good Indian ponies. With reference 
to the giving of prizes for horses best suited for police work, I hardly think that the 
results justify the continuance of the practice. The fairs are as a rule held so late in 
the year that very few of the ranchers care to hold a horse over and then run chances 
of getting a prize, they prefer selling when an opportunity is afforded. A better plan 
I think would be to give a bonus of fifteen or twenty dollars to the man turning in the 
best horse at some of the principal points of purchase, or divide the amount given into 
six prizes and award these to the parties turning in the six best horses, the awards to 



122 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

be made after the buying was finished, this would give every one an opportunity of 
winning one of the prizes. 

The draft made upon the force for the purpose of supplying the Second Contingent^ 
C. M. R., by which our best horses were taken, has made it particularly hard upon the 
young horses purchased last year, and the remounts taken over this. They have had to 
take the place of well matured horses. Not only this, but they have in a great many 
cases been given into the charge of men who have had very little experience with horses. 
These men as a rule take good care of their horses, but do not make any distinction 
between a young and an old horse when on a journey. This state of affairs could not 
have been avoided, as it was absolutely necessary to fill up the detachments and there 
were not enough tried men to go round. 

In conclusion I would say that while there is not being made the progress in horse 
breeding which the present state of the market justifies, and which I would like to see, 
I cannot say that there is any noticeable retrograde movement, that is, within the past 
eight or ten years. The results of the awful mixture of blood started about fifteen years 
ago has to a certain extent disappeared or became modified, and by the introduction of 
some good stallions this country would soon gain a reputation as a horse breeding centre 
second to none. 

A list of remounts purchased during the year and the breeding, where known, will 
be found attached. 



List of remounts, giving place and date of purchase and from whom purchased, also 
breeding as far as could be learned. 



From whom purchased. 


No. 


Place. 


Date. 


Remarks. 


H. C. Liawson 


2 

1 

1 

2 

1 
9 

1 
2 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

4 
4 


Regina 

Moosomin 

Wolseley., 

Maple Creek . . . . 

Calgary 


1901. 
May 30,. 

1. 31.. 

June 1 . 

4.. 

4.. 
4.. 

5.. 

5.. 

5.. 

5.. 

5.. 

5.. 

5.. 

5.. 
5.. 
5.. 


Both by Frankmount (trotting) out of Der- 


Thus. S. Gillman 

Joseph Cape 


wentwater mares. 

By Bushfield (thoroughbred) ; dam's breeding 
unknown. 

By Dexter (trotting); dam's breeding un- 
known. 

By trotting stallion ; dam's breeding un- 


Albert Young 

W. A. Douglas 


known. 
Breeding unknown. 
4 by Vernmont (trotting) ; dam's breeding 




unknown ; 3 by Blair Athol (thoroaghbred) ; 
dam's breeding unknown ; 2 breeding un- 
known. 
By Starline, out of Flora by Milton Medium 


J. A. W. Frazer 


(trotting). 
1 by Juryman and 1 by Canada, both 


Frank Sibbald 




thoroughbred ; dam's breeding unknown. 

By Jiuyman (thoroughbred); dam's breed- 
ing unknown. 

By Hobby Coachman (coach) ; dam's breed- 
ing unknown. 

Breeding unknown ; probably by a range 
stallion ; one of the best purchased. 

By Eagle's Plume (thoroughbred) ; dam's 


Frank Ricks 

Jerry Sullivan . ... 

0. A. Critchly 




RalphBell 

Donald McGillis 





breeding unknown. 

By Juryman (thoroughbred) ; dam's breed- 
ing unknown. 

Breeding \iuknown. 


Jno. Hamilton 




1 breeding unknown. 

1 by Hodgins, dam by Patchen (trotting); 
1 by Sharper King, dam Lady Dutton, by 
Mambrino Dutton (trotting) ; 1 by Little 
Billy (trotting) ; dam's breeding unknown. 







REP0R2 OF VETERINARY SURGEON BURNETT 123 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

List of remounts, giving place and date of purchase, &c. — Concluded. 



From whom purchased. 


No. 


Place. 


Date. 


Remarks. 


Alphus Mankas 

George Lane 

F. W. Ings 

A. L. Christie 

A H Eckford 


1 
3 
1 

3 

7 

2 

1 
1 

1 
1 
4 
4 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
5 

3 
2 

2 
1 

1 

10 
10 


TTiffVi T?ivpr 


1901. 

June 6 . . 
6.. 
6.. 

G.. 

6.. 

6.. 

8.. 
8.. 

1, 10. . 
„ 10. . 
,1 10.. 

11 11.. 
„ 11.. 
„ 11.. 

1, 12.. 
1, 13.. 
M 26.. 
II 22.. 

1, 22.. 

1, 22. . 
., 24. . 

M 24.. 
II 24.. 
1. 26.. 

M 26. . 

July 6. . 

1, 13.. 

Aug. 1.. 

3.. 

3.. 

3.. 

3.. 

3.. 
II 17.. 
II 20.. 
11 20. . 
„ 30.. 

Sept. 2.. 
Aug. 3.. 


Breeding unknown. 

By a President's colt (Hackney); dam*s 
breeding unknown. 

2 breeding unknown ; 1 by Aerastic (thorough- 
bred) ; dam's breeding unknown. 

4 by Floridar, 3 by Vancouver, both (thor- 
oughbred) ; dam's breeding unknown. 

Both by Moonshine (thoroughbred) ; dam's 
breeding unknown. 

Breeding unknown. 


Macleod 

Pincher Creek 

Lethbridge 

II 

II 

Medicine Hat 

Moose Jaw. ..... 

Calgary 




R. Paterson 


D. F. Johnston 

Nelson Murray 


By Quinquagesima ; dan's breeding un- 
known. 
Breeding unknown. 


ClifiFord Tench 




I^ell Bros 


II 


John Woolf 




F. H. Turner 

A. Austin 


•• 


J. F. Sanderson 


,, 


W. Walsh 


By a Hackney ; dam's breeding unknown. 
Breeding unknown. 

1 breeding unknown ; 4 by Vemmont (trot- 
ting) ; dam's breeding unknown. 
Breeding unknown. 


L. S. Manzer 

W. A. Douglas 

W. R. Penland 


Maple Creek 

Macleud 


W. W. Arnold 


By Stilton (thoroughbred) ; dam's breeding 


W. H. McNab ,. .. 

J.Bryant 


II ■ 

II 

Calcrarv 


unknown. 
Breeding unknown. 

By Eagle's Plume (thoroughbred); dam's 

breeding unknown. 
Breeding unknown. 


Jno. Woolfe 


Macleod 

Macleod 






R G. Rjbinson 


? 


Calgary 


II 


Chas. Bremner 

R. L. Robinson 


2 
2 
5 
7 
3 
1 
1 
1 
4 
3 

9 
1 


Fort Saskatchewan 

Calgary 

Macleod 


II 


A Stevenson. 


II 


Jno Woolfe 




II 


Bell Bros 






J. H. Pilling 

G. E. Goddard........ 


Cockrane 

Calearv 


By Jurynian ; dam's breeder unknown. 
Breedmg unknown. 


R. G Robinson 






A H Eckford 




1 by Vancouver ; 2 by Flanidor (thorough- 


Geo. Lane .... 


Macleod 


bred) ; dam's breeding unknown. 
Breeding unknown. 


0. A. Critchley ..... 


Calgary 


By Aerastic (thoroughbred) ; dam's breeding 






unknown. 



JOHN F. BURNETT, Inspector, 

Veterinary Surgeon. 



1-2 EDWARD Vn, 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



A. 1902 



PART II. 



STRENGTH AP DISTRIBUTION OF THE NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE. 



Schedule A (summer, 1901) 

„ B (November 30, 1901). 



Page. 
. 3 
. 6 



1-2 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

APPENDIX A. 



A. 1902 



DISTRIBUTION STATE OF THE FORCE BY DIVISIONS DURING THE 

SUMMER OF 1901. 



*> 
Q 


Station. 


§ 

s 


O 

|l 


1 
1 


1— 1 


1 

43 


X 

il 
> 


i 


S 


1 


1 


i 
is 

s 

a 




W 


f 


Depot . . 


Regina 


1 


1 


1 


8 

1 


1 




10 


8 
1 


9 
1 


55 


12 


106 
7 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
8 
1 
2 
5 
7 
12 

166 

20 
2 
1 
3 
3 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 


54 
5 

3 

2 
3 
2 

2 
9 

1 
1 

"io 

104 

28 
3 
1 
5 
5 
2 
1 
1 




Vloosomin . 












































.... 






Moose Jaw 
























White wood 
















1 




































Grenfell . 


















"l 






Saltcoats 




















Yorkton .... 






















Erwood 












































Ft. Qu'Appelle 
























Estevan 














1 




























6 

8 

93 

13 
2 
1 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 


. .. 

14 

3 






North Portal 














1 

1 










Wood Mountain 








































Town Station 
























Ottawa . 














4 






South Africa 






1 












On Command , 






1 
10 

1 


1 


.111 


18 
1 


12 

1 


2 
14 




A 


Total, Depot Division. . . 
Maple Creek 


1 


1 


2 

1 


.... 




East End 














Faiwell . 
























Ten Mile . 






































1 










Medicine Hat. 














1 


"i 






Swift Current 




















Town Station 














































Piepot 




















1 






On Command , . 

On Herd.. 


.... 














1 




















Total, A. Division 


— 




1 
1 


1 
1 






2 

3 

1 


3 

1 
1 


1 

"'"i 


27 

14 
4 

1 
1 


3 
4 


38 

24 

7 
1 
1 


47 

22 
6 
1 
1 




C 


Battleford 














Onion Lake ..... . 














Jackfish 


















Macf arlane's 

Henrietta 














































Saskatoon 




















1 

1 

14 

1 


.... 

1 
1 


1 

3 

.21 

3 

1 
1 


2 
4 

19 
4 
1 

1 






On Command . 
















1 


""2 




F 


Prince Albert 








2 






2 






















Batoche . . . . 




















Rosthern 


















1 
































Flett Spring's 




















1 

2 

41 


.... 

8 


1 

3 

67 


1 
62 






Pas Patrol . . . 
























Total, C. and F. Divisions 






1 


3 







6 


4 


4 

















NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
Schedule A. — Distribution State of the Force by Divisions — Continued, 



§ 

is 

> 


Station. 


0) 

% 

"i 

1 


il 

id 
1 


i 

1 
1 

1 


t 

EC 

>-* 

3 

1 


t 

< 
1 


> 

1 


i 
i 

4 


1 

1 
1 


6 

4 


i 
1 

QQ 

29 
3 
2 
2 

2 
4 
1 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 


A 
II 

g 

6 
* 4 

"i 

... 


1 

50 
5 
3 
2 

6 
2 
1 


46 

7 
5 
3 
5 

8 
2 

1 






D 


Macleod 




















Big Bend 


















Kootenai . % . 






















Stand Oflf 














1 

1 
1 


















1 










Cardston . . . .... 










.... 












































2 1 

3 4 

2; 2 
2 - 






Leavings . 
























Mosquito Creek. 










































1 
























1 
2 

1 


7 
3 
3 

1 
1 

131 
23 

\ 






Peisran .. 
























Town Patrol 










































K 








1 


1 






2 


1 


2 

1 

"*1 

1 


15 
1 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 

78 

21 
2 
1 

1 
1 
1 


1 

13 

5 

"3 


23 
2 
4 
3 
3 
1 
1 

126 

33 
2 
2 

5 

8 
59 

29 

8 
1 
2 
1 
1 

2 
2 
6 
2 
3 
2 

61 






Milk River Ridffe 














Coutts 














1 








Writing on Stone 


















Pendant d'Oreille 






















St. Mary's 






















Magrath . 






















E 


Total D. & K. Divisions. 






2 

1 


6 
1 


1 


1 


10 
2 


4 
1 


11 
2 


.... 


Banff 










... 






Red Deer 






.... 








1 


















































1 
5 
1 

2 
1 
1 
1 

1 


... 






f-rlpiplipri 














1 










TTicrh R.ivpr 














1 








Okotoks 














1 












Millarville 


















1 
1 

1 
1 


i 
9 

2 
1 






Rosebud 






, 


















Olds 
























TTinisfail 
























Sarcee • 
































1 
2 

1 
1 










2 
4 

1 


5 
36 

19 
5 


7 
51 

40 
6 
1 

2 
1 
1 
2 
2 






G 


Total E. Division 




..... 


1 
1 






5 

3 


2 

2 
1 


.... 


















Edna 


















St Albert . . 


















2 

38 


* 'i 

"i 

5 






























Whitford 
















































\V^pt.{|.<sVl'WlT1 


















6 






A fViahnspji TiandincT ...... 






























1 








1 
1 


4 
4 








Peace River Landinsf 




































Treaty Escort, No. 8 


















63 








Total G. Division 


.... 


.... 


1 


3 








3 


5 


.... 



DISTRIBUTION STATE OF THE FORCE BY DIVISIONS 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Schedule A — Distribution state of the Force by Division — Co7icluded. 





Station. 


1 
S 

6 


i 

a g 
<3 


1 

1 


1 

o 

CD 

a 

1— 1 


03 

<5 


Is 

"Sec 
> 


1 
1 


i 

1 


a 
1 


1 


1^ 

al 


3 

5 


W 


i 
1 


^ 


B 


Dawson 








2 


1 ^ 


1 




3 


3 


4 


51 
6 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
5 
2 
4 
3 
2 
2 
1 
8 
8 

104 

1 
2 

1 
1 


5 

"i 

"i 

1 

" i 

9 

42 
11 
2 
4 
2 
1 
4 
4 


74 
6 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 
8 
4 
5 
4 
3 
3 
2 

10 
9 

144 

15 

7 


11 

"'2 
1 
1 

I 


23 




Forty Mile 








4 














1 












5 




Osrilvie . . 






















5 




St.pwa.rh T{ i vfr 


















1 




' 8 






















7 




Selwyn 

Selkirk 










1 


1 






1 




' 9 

1 10 




IT r>n t.fli i kn 
















i 8 














1 






1 










Dominion 
















1 
1 
1 
1 






























Sulx^hur 

Gold Run 

Euroka 


.... 


































1 






















1 
1 


"i 

9 

28 
6 
1 
3 
2 
1 
3 
4 


.... 


5 




Town Station 




















On Command 






















H 


Total B. Division.... 
White Horse.. 






1 


2 

1 
1 


6 

1 
1 


2 


1 


5 
3 


7 

6 
1 


17 
' 1 


84 


Dal ton Trail 

It House 






11 




Wells . . 




















.... 


— 






Stikine 




















s 




White Pass Summit .... 
































1 






, . .. 


4 




Taffish 
















?0 




McOlintock 


















5 
























1 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
4 
1 

75 


5 


1 
3 
4 


































7 






















"l 


6 




TTont.n 1 i n n 1 1 fl 
















4 






5 






















2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
5 
2 

103 










Tantalus 














1 










6 




FiThflp Sfl.lninn ' 
















1 






6 




Big 


















7 




Five Finarers 












• ... 






i 


7 




Town Station 












22 

i 


1 






On PlriTTimfl.'nrl 








3 














Total 




.... 


1 


2 


" 


2 


5 


10 


87 



RECAPITULATION. 



Regina District 


1 


1 


11 


'1 

3 
6 
2 
3 

25 
9 

34 


1 




18 

2 

6 

10 

5 

3 

44 

7 


12 
3 

4 
4 

2 
5 

30 
12 


14 

1 

4 

11 

4 

6 



40 
19 


87 
27 

41 

78 
36 
38 



307 
179 

492 


14 
3 

8 

13 

9 

5 

52 
14 

66 


159 

38 

67 

126 

59 

61 

510 
247 

• 7 

764 


104 
47 






Battleford & Prince Albert Dis- 






62 

131 

51 

63 

458 
39 

497 






IVFanlrf^nrl-Ti^^tViKrirlfyp T)ist. 






1 


1 
















Sn^Q Va.t,p Vi p wan F) i s tri ct 






... 


1 


"i 

.... 
1 




Total in N. W. Territories 

11 Yukon .. 

South Africa 


1 


1 


iii 


Grand Total 


1 


1 


6 


■ 
1 


51 


42 


59 


171 



28—9 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

APPENDIX B. 



DISTRIBUTION STATE OF THE FORCE BY DIVISIONS, NOVEMBER 

30, 1901. 





Station, 


i 

1 

1 


1 

'a 

u a 

! S3 O 

r 
1 


i 

1 


! 

1 

1 

8 

1 


1 ^ 

m 

1 

< 

1 


1 
> 


1 
1 

1 

7 


1 

J 
7 
1 


i 
1 

i 

4 


i 
1 

02 

1 

49 
2 


3 

13 


1 

92 

1 ] 

] 

1 

20 
9 
2 


• 61 

5 
1 
2 


, 


Depot . . 


Regina 

AToosnTn i n 


1 
j 
















1 






Wolseley 


















1 


... 






Moose Jaw 




.... 




.... 


.... 






1 








1 






1 
1 

'3 
1 
2 
2 
3 
1 
2 
4 






Grenfell 


















1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

" i 

"2 
1 
1 

1 
1 


' i 
.... 






Carlyle 










































1 






Fort Pelly 






















Kutawa 








































1 








Estevan 














1 


1 




Oxbow 


















North Portal 














1 
1 


— 













































Town Station 


















1 


1 
1 

"" i 




















































Erwood 
















1 








On ponimanrl 








1 






1 
2 


? 


1 


1 

... 




























1 


1 






92 

27 
3 
1 
5 
5 
2 
1 
1 
2 

47 

39 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 

17 
5 
1 
1 
3 

75 






Ottawa 










4 

18 

2 






1 

86 

14 
2 

1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 






A 


Total, Depot Division . . . 
Maple Creek 


1 


1 


2 

1 


11 

1 


.... 
1 


.... 


11 

1 


10 
2 


15 156 

i 
3 24 







East End 






;:."j 


2 
1 
3 
3 

2 

1 
1 






Farwell 
























Ten Mile 




. 


































1 


"i 


.... 






Medicine Hat ... 


















3wif t Current 










... 


.... 






• 


On herd 

Total, A . Division 

Battlnford 




.... 


1 

1 


1 








-- 











• 


3 

3 

1 




2 
1 


25 
13 

"i 

1 
I 
5 
11 
1 


! 
3 37 




c 






i 

.... 

""'i! 
1! 


25 
1 
1 

1 
1 
6 
17 
3 
1 
1 
5 

a?. 






















Jackfish 










































Saskatoon 

Dn ofimiTiand 






























1 
2 


... 


... 


2 


"i 


"i 
"i 




F 


Pr i n f»p A 1 Vkprt 












Duck Lake 


































r 
1 




















1 
5 

39 


7j 




Tn nnminand 


















.s 




Total C & F Division 






1 


3 






6 


3 





















DISTRIBUTION STATE OF THE FORGE BY DIVISIONS 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Schedule B. — Distribution State of the Force by Divisions — Continued. 



1 

.2 
> 


Stations. 


i 
% 

•m 

1 

a 


1 

i 
< 


1 

m 


1 

1 


00 

1 

1 


> 

1 


so 

1 

% 

m 


... 


00 

a 

4 

"i 


1 
1 

§ 


24 
4 
1 

1 

3 

1 
2 
2 

\ 

1 




44 

6 
2 
2 

I 

1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 

\ 

17 

3 

1^ 

125 

37 

2 
1 
1 

1 


42 
7 
4 
4 
6 
7 
1 
• 2 
4 
3 
4 
3 
1 

'i5 
5 
9 
4 
5 
11 

137 

37 
3 

2 

"l 
4 

1 
1 
2 

I 

"1 
4 

57 
34 

\ 

1 

1 
1 
2 
1 

"3 
4 

1 
1 

59 


^ 


D 


1 
1 




1 


3 

1 


1 


6 

"4 
.... 

' i 
"1 
















Biff Bend 


































Standoff 

St Mary's . 




















Bla.irmnrp. . 
































































Mosqiiito Creek 










.... 






















1 


. 




































Peisran ••• 
























Town Patrol 
















1 
1 

1 






















"i 
1 

"i 

"2 

11 

3 

1 


4 
12 


2 
1 




K 


Lethbridge 






1 


... 












Milk River Ridge 










Coutts 


















3 

2 
1 

8 

75 

23 

1 

1 

1 
1 

i 


16 
5 
























Pendant d'Oreille 
















4 

1 














1 
6 

2 


1 


1 


9 
2 




E 


Total D. andK. Divisions, 
fjalcarv 






2 

1 






Banff 










Red Deer 














1 






Canmore 








.... 


.... 






















1 


i 




3 5 
1 






High River . . . . 


















Innidfail 

Okotoks 


















1 
1 
1 


















1 










Millarville 


















1 




























1 1 
1 






Olds .. 




















1 






On Herd 
























On Command 




















2 

32 

18 
5 
2 

1 

2 
1 

40 


2 
9 55 

1 25 

2 « 






Total E. Division 






1 
1 


2 

1 
1 




-— 


5 
3 


2 

1 

1 


4 




O 


Fort Saskatchewan 
























St Albert 
















2 
1 

1 

\ 

1 
2 
6 
3 

\ 

60 




























































Duhame] 




















Weta&kiwin . 


















1 






Star 








































1 














1 






... 


1 

1 


6 






Peace River Landing 












iWhitford 




















Lac La Biche 






























































3 


4 


1 
3 






Total G. Division 






1 


3 




.... 















28—91 



NOBTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
Schedule B. — Distribution State of the Force by Divisions — Concluded. 





Station. 


§ 

s 


1 

1 
s 

1 


1 

1 
J 


CD 


1 
1 

1 

4 


1 


(3 

1 
1 


i 

1 

— 


1 
1 

2 


1 

5 
1 


i 
so 

D 

48 
4 
2 

1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
5 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
12 
2 


15 

"i 

"l 
1 

i 
1 

1 


o 

w 

80 
5 
2 
3 
3 
2 
2 
4 
3 
2 
8 
4 
3 
3 
2 
2 
3 

15 
2 
1 

149 

17 
6 


:?^ 
11 

■'"2 

1 

\ 



.... 

17 
.... 


i 


B 










1 


44 




Forty Mile 

Indian River. 








4 
5 




Osrilvie 






















5 






















] 




8 






















7 




Selwyn 




— 


















9 




Selkirk 

Minto 

Hootchiku 










1 






1 




10 






























g 




Grand Forks 










1 








1 


"'l 
1 
1 

1 

.... 


























Hunker . 

Sulphur 










.... 















Gold Run 








































1 


i 

1 






McQuestin 
















5 




Town Station 












































On Leave 

Total, B. Division. . . 

White Horse 








1 

2 

3 
















"H " 




.... 


1 


5 

1 
1 


2 


3 


5 
5 


7 

5 

1 


11 

47 
8 
3 
1 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 


95 

3 
4 





.... 
. ... 


22 

68 

• 

4 

I 

3 
3 
4 
2 
3 
3 
4 


105 
32 




Dalton Trail 






12 




Stikine 














... 


f> 




W Pass Summit . 








































1 




'"2 


.... 


f^ 


















7 




Lower LaBarge 
















1 




f^ 




Hootalinqua 

Livingston Cr 

Tantalus. . 














.... 


H 








13 
























5 




Little Salmon. 










.... 










.. 






BisT Salmon 


















Five lingers 

Town Station 
























8 








• 










1 




2 
27 




17 






On Command 








....1 -.- 




13 




Total, H. Div 






1 


3 


2 




3 


8 


9 


84 


7 


117 


115 













RECAPITULATION. 



Regina District 

Maple Creek District 

Battleford & Prince Albert Dist. 


1 


1 


1 
1 
1 
2 

1 
1 

7 

3 

1 

11 


10 
1 
3 
6 
2 
3 

25 



8 
1 

34 


1 


... 


1 
181 11 


10 


86 
25 
39 
75 
32 
40 

297 

179 


15 
3 

7 

16 

9 

6 

56 

29 


154 
37 
62 

125 
55 
60 

493 

266 

2 

761 


92 
47 
75 
137 
57 
59 

4H7 

44 

511 






3l 2, 2 
6l 3; 3 
9l 4' 11 
5! 2 4 
3! 4 3 

44! 26 33 
















1 

2 
4 


1 

1 






Calgary District. 










Saskatchewan District. . 










Total in N. W. Territories 


1 
1 


1 



1 




Total in Yukon Territory . . . . 
Total in South \frica 


8; 15 


20 


1 


220 


Grand Total 


6 


1 


'1 ' ■ 
52 41 53 


476 


85 


1 


9^ 











1-2 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 A. 1902 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
PART III 

YUKON TERRITORY 

PagS 

Kei)ort of Superintendent Z. T. Wood, Commanding 3 

APPENDICES TO ABOVE. 

A ppendix A. — Superintendent A. E. Snyder, White Horse 15 

B. —Inspector C. Starnes, Dawson 35 

C. -Inspector A. M. Jarvis, CM. G., Dalton Trail 67 

D.— Assistant Surgeon L. A. Pare, White Horse 73 

E.— Assistant Surgeon S. ^l. Eraser, Dalton Trail 76 

F. — Assistant Surgeon W. E. Thompson, Dawson 78 

G. —Assistant Surgeon G. Madore, Selkirk 81 



1-2 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 A. 1902 



North-west Mounted Police, 

Dawson, Y.T., December 1, 1901. 
The Right Honourable, 

Sir Wilfrid Laurier, G.C.M,G., &c., &c.. 

President of the Privy Council, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report for the North-west 
Mounted Police serving in the Yukon Territory for the year ended November 30, 1901, 
together with reports of the following officers : — 

Supt. A. E. Snyder, commanding ' H ' Division, White Horse. 

Inspector C. Starnes, commanding ' B ' Division, Dawson. 

Inspector A. M. Jarvis, C.M.G., commanding Dalton Trail Detachments. 

Asst. Surg. L. A. Pare, White Horse. 

Asst. Surg. S. M. Eraser, Dalton Trail. 

Asst. Surg. W. E. Thompson, Dawson. 

Asst. Surg. G. H. Madore, Selkirk. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Z. T. WOOD, 

Superintendent 
Commanding N. W. M. Police^ Yukon Territory. 



OFFICERS. 

The following officers are serving in the Yukon Territory at the date of this report : — 
Supt. Z. T. Wood, commanding Territory. 

' H ' Division. 

Supt. A. E. Snyder, commanding Division 

Insp. D. M. Howard. 

Insp. A. M. Jarvis. C.M.G 

Insp. F. P. Horrigan. 

Insp. E. A, Pelletier. 

Asst. Surg. L. A. Pare. 

Asst. Surg. S. M. Eraser, Dalton Trail. 

' B ' Division. 

Supt. P. C. H. Primrose, on leave. 

Insp. C. Starnes, commanding Division. 

Insp. W. H. Routledge. 

Insp. T. A. Wroughton. 

Insp. F. L. Cosby. 

Insp. A. E. C. McDonell. 

Asst. Surg. W". E. Thompson. 

Asst. Surg. G. H. Madore, Selkirk. 

In March last, Supt. Primrose was transferred to ' B ' division from ' H,' and 
assumed command of the Dawson district, vice Inspector Starnes. The latter again took 
charge in October, wdien Mr. Primrose went on leave. 



4 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Inspector (now Superintendent) Snyder arrived from the North-west Territories in 
March, 1901, and assumed command of the White Horse district, vice Supt. Primrose 
transferred. 

Inspector Scarth left Dawson to join the South African Constabulary in September 
last. 

Inspector Pelletier has just joined 'H' Division from the North-west Territories. 

Inspector Jarvis reported for duty in Ma^^ last on his return from South Africa. 

Inspector McGinnis returned to the North-west Territories in August after several 
months temporary duty in the Yukon. 

Inspectors Wroughton and Cosby reported for duty on their return from South 
Africa in March last, and Inspector Howard in June. 

Assistant Surgeons Thompson and Madore returned off leave in September last. 

From all the officers I have received loyal and hearty support, and especially from 
the officers commanding divisions, viz., Superintendents Primrose and Snyder and 
Inspector Starnes. 

ASSISTANCE TO OTHER DEPARTMENTS. 

A large proportion of the work performed by the police is in assisting other depart- 
ments ; for instance, in collecting royalty on the output of each claim on all the differ- 
ent creeks in the territory. This alone occupies the whole time and attention of an 
officer, 8 N. C. O's. and 14 constables. In addition to this, escorts were furnished weekly 
to bring in the gold dust from the different creeks. Next to the collection of royalty comes 
the assistance rendered to the Crown timber and land agent, collecting timber and wood 
dues. This entailed a lot of hard work for the detachments on the river. Constant 
patrols were kept up by canoe and close watch kept on the quantity" of wood cut, per- 
mits checked, and fees collected, which lattei were forwarded to the nearest agent in the 
district. A constable with canoe accompanied the timber and land inspector from 
White Horse to Dawson. 

Men are constantl}^ employed assisting the Customs Department at the following 
Ports of Entry : — Dal ton Trail, B.C., (Asst. Surg. Eraser, sub-collector) Wells Detach- 
ments on Dalton Trail, B.C., 1 constable ; Bennett, B.C., 1 constable part of the year 
only, office moved to White Horse May 1st.; White Horse, 1 constable ; Dawson, 1 con- 
stable when required ; Forty-Mile, 1 corporal. A Customs station was opened at 
Glacier Creek on the Dalton Trail with a constable in charge, but was kept open for 
a short time only, as there was no traffic over that route and no work carried on at Glacier. 

Assistance has been rendered the government telegraph service every time the line 
needed repairing, a constable in each case accompanied the line repairer. 

A large amount of work has been done for the Sheriffs office, principally serving 
writs, &c., on the creeks, and serving capias, at the boundaries. 

In order to save time, it was arranged that the sheriff should communicate direct 
with the officers, N. C. O's. or constables in charge at the place where the service had 
to be performed, instead of sending through the officer commanding the division. 

Men were employed for a considerable time during the summer assisting the tax 
collector at Dawson. 

Every assistance was rendered the Census Commissioner, Major H. J. Woodside, 
in taking the census of the territory by the various N.C.O's. and constables in charge 
of the detachments on the creeks and river. In most instances they acted as census 
enumerators. Three men were also detailed to assist in taking the census of Dawson City. 

Standing orderlies are supplied to the territorial and police courts and an orderly 
is detailed to attend all meetings of the Yukon council. 

Bank guards are provided nightly for each bank in Dawson, and are on duty from 
7 p. m. to reveille. 

While the above shows that the police in the Yukon afford a good deal of assist- 
ance to other departments, I must, at the same time, express my appreciation of the un- 
failing courtesy and hearty support received from the officials of the other branches of 
the government service, when it has been in their power to do us a good turn. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT WOOD 5 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

MINING. 

Although considerable work has been done on the creeks during the past summer, 
it is expected that a great deal more will be carried out during the coming winter. It 
was thought that better results could be obtained by doing summer work with the 
machinery now in the country, but this theory, in a great many instances, has been 
exploded, although some ground pays better to work in summer than in winter. 

Prospectors have been very active during the past year and several new discoveries 
have been made, viz. : Montana Creek and tributaries. Lower Discovery on Dominion 
below Gold Run, Montreal, German, Bishop, McKinnon, Benson, Dawson, Duncan, 
Mayo, All Gold, Veronia, Sour-dough, Yukon River, 3 miles above Dawson, Rabbit, 
Ganoin Gulch, Henry Gulch, Scribner and Sherwood Creeks. 

A large number of hillsides and bench groups of old creeks have been stampeded 
and recorded. 

On Henderson Creek, in the Stewart River district, which w^as staked from one 
end to the other in 1898, discovery claim has been steadily worked by three French 
Canadians for the last three years. They had been taking out but little more than 
wages until last summer, when they were rewarded by striking some good ground run- 
ning from .3 to 20c. to the pan. As soon as the news became known it caused a great 
stampede and consequently the whole district was re-staked. A few contemplate taking 
machinery in to work their claims and a large number intend doing considerable work ; 
this will be an important point during the coming year. 

The reports from Clear Creek in the McQuestin district show that little but ordin- 
ary assessment work has been done, so that little is yet known as to its richness, or 
otherwise. 

A sensational story was circulated regarding the new strike on Duncan Creek in 
the McQuestin district, to the effect that three Swede miners had been located there for 
the past three years, and, after taking out dust valued at some ^30,000 left, after the 
close of navigation, for the outside, not having recorded any discovery, or paid foyalty. 
The (alleged) result was that they were held up at White Horse and the dust confiscated 
as they were unable to produce the necessary certificates from the Gold Commissioner 
that royalty had been paid, nor could they explain where the gold came from, as the 
Creek was then unnamed and the claim not recorded. It is said their object was to go 
outside and bring in their friends before recording. As no such report had reached here 
from White Horse, the matter was inquired into and found to be untrue. In the mean- 
time, however, there was a big stampede from all parts and the Creek is now all staked. 
It is quite evident that some persons had been working there for some time as a good 
cabin, sluice boxes, and other evidences that the place had been occupied were found. 

The following statistics taken from the records in the Gold Commissioner's office 
will show the amount of business done as compared with that of last year : — 

1900. 1901. 

Number of placer grants issued 790 4,602 

Renewals 3,466 3,462 

" Assignments 4,396 6,695 

" Documents recorded 7,486 2,770 

Certificates of work, placer 2,943 3,561 

Partnership 204 382 

" . Payments in lieu of assessment 151 125 

" Water grants issued 1 30 ... 

QUARTZ. 

" Receipts issued 671 1,123 

Certificates of work 90 382 

" Partnership 18 43 

" Pa\Tnents in lieu of assessment 20 33 

" Placer claims recorded in Territory. . . . 10,042 

Quartz " " " .. .. .1,291 



6 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

But very little gold has been taken out of the Big Salmon district this season, and 
very little development other than assessment work, has been done. A good deal of 
prospecting has been going on and reports are very encouraging. The district has in- 
creased in importance and large results are expected next season. 

QUARTZ. 

A vast amount of development work has been done and large quantities of rock is 
being delivered at the two-stamp mills, viz.: The Munger mill and the Ladue. The 
former has been running some time and the latter is just about to commence. Both are 
overwhelmed with samples and have to refuse orders for the time being. It is under- 
stood that at least six more mills will be established before another year has passed. 

The advent of stamp mills w411 be a great aid in the development of quartz mines 
in the Territory, of which there are a large number, and some are reported to be 
immensly rich. 

The principal quartz claims are located as follows : — 

Conglomerate group, Indian River District ; Rock Creek, Victoria Gulch, Ophir 
Group. 

COAL MINES. 

It is estimated that 1,000 tons of coal was shipped to Dawson from the Five 
Fingers coal mine during navigation, and a much larger quantity from the N. A. T. & 
T. Co.'s mine at Rock Creek in the Forty Mile district. A good grade of coal has been 
found close to White Horse. 

Coal is being used a great deal more now than in former years and will eventually 
become the principal fuel. 

COPPER. 

Considerable work has been done on the various copper claims in the White Horse 
district and a small quantity of ore was shipped out for which a good price was ob- 
tained. It is understood that some of the properties have changed hands for consider- 
able sums. 

ARMS AND EQUIPMENT. 

My remarks of last year still apply to the Winchester carbines in use in this terri- 
tory. We should be supplied with a new and serviceable weapon suited to the country. 

A new revolver should also be supplied, as the Enfields now in use have seen a lot 
of ser\dce and the majority of them are loose and unsafe to use. They are too heavy to 
carry when travelling with dogs or on foot. 

The Maxims and Maxim-^Nlordenfeldt guns on charge are in good condition. The 
7-pounder brass M. L. guns are still in use firing the noon-day gun. They are also used 
for saluting purposes. The carriages have had to be repaired several times. 

We still have the forty-three Lee-Metford rifles at Dawson, but, as I remarked 
last year, this is not a sufficient number to arm the whole Division, and it is advisable 
that all should be furnished with the same weapon. 

BAR BACK BUILDINGS AND REPAIRS. 

More quarters for married officers are needed in Dawson ; at present the officer 
commanding the division has to live out of barracks. 

A new guardroom will be requii ed at White Horse, the accommodation of the prison 
being altogether too limited. Owing to a mistake at the time of building, what should 
have been inside measurements w^ere taken for outside, and the building is too narrow to 
insert cells. It can be used for something else and a new one should be put up at once. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT WOOD 7 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Owing to the limited accommodation for stores at White Horse, I authorized Supt. 
Snyder to employ four Specials, at $3 per day each, to erect a store building 60 x 20 
in prolongation of the Q. M. Store building ; this will be a one and a half story building 
with accommodation for light material upstairs. I also authorized Supt. Snyder to 
erect pump houses over the two M'^ells at White Horse, each house to be 10 x 16. 

The following additional buildings have been erected at White Horse : — 

Bath and wash room 25 x 40 

Division and casualty store 25 x 75 

Quarters for Asst. -Surgeon, two story 24x26 

and kitchen 16x16 

Latrine 8x16 

Ice house 16 x 24 

Warm and comfortable stables have been erected at all detachments on the river. 

Detachment buildings have been erected at the following stations : — Wells, Living- 
stone Creek, Forty Mile, Eureka Creek, Sulphur Creek and Grand Forks . Buildings 
are also under course of erection at Chico and Montague on the Cut-off trail. 

I strongly recommend' the building of a new officers mess at Dawson, owing to the 
fact that the building we intended taking for that purpose had to be left for the new 
police magistrate, otherwise he would have had no place to hold court. The present 
officers mess could be turned into married quarters. If we cannot obtain the old Court 
house building, which properly belongs to us, the present mess should be torn down and 
a new one erected in its place. There is only accommodation for three officers in the 
present building and while it would make good married quarters, it is unsuitable for its 
present purposes. 

It is absolutely necessary, if we are to continue keeping convicts here, that the 
building at present used as a guard room and penitentiary be torn down and a suitable 
structure put up in its place. The present jail has been added to from time to time and 
alterations made to try and keep up with the demand for room. In its present shape it 
is not by any means a safe place to keep prisoners in, much less convicts. A portion of 
the jail yard has been covered in and is used as a kitchen. The Bank of Commerce 
building stands within three feet of the penitentiary portion. 

I would also ask for necessary funds to erect a proper recreation room. The place 
at present in use is a canteen and recreation room combined, and is entirely too small 
for the purpose. The billiard table can seldom, if ever, be used, owing to the crowded 
condition of the place. 

The building at present in use as a sergeants mess is falling in and should be torn 
down and rebuilt. It is not adapted for its present purpose, being first built for Supt. 
Constantine. It had to be put in use as a sergeants mess owing to the absence of any 
other building. 

Several fine buildings have been erected in the town of Dawson during the past 
year, most notably the commissioner's residence, the Administration Building, Public 
School, &c. 

The Court House Avhich was commenced last year has been completed and has been 
in use for some time. 

CRIME. 

Although the number of minor cases has increased somewhat during the year, it is 
very satisfactory to be able to report the almost entire absence of any serious crime 
throughout the territory. 1,104 cases were tried in the police court ; drunks and wage 
cases being far in the majority. 

The now celebrated murder case of Rex. vs. O'Brien came to a successful issue on 
June 21, and O'Brien was hanged in the jail yard on August 23 in the presence of a 
number of prominent persons. The case attracted world-wide attention and great satis- 
faction was expressed by all at the outcome. The police came in for a great deal of 
praise for the manner in which the case was worked, which although very costly, showed 



8 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

would-be criminals that no stone would be left unturned to bring offenders to justice. 
This case is fully gone into in the report of the officer commanding ' B ' division. 

The sentences of death passed on James Slorah for the murder of his alleged wife, 
Pearl Mitchell, and on George T. St. Cyr, for the murder of one James Davis, at Hoota- 
linqua, were both commuted to life imprisonment. The latter is developing signs of 
insanity. 

Of twenty-one lunatics confined during the year, eight were transferred to New 
Westminster Asylum, twelve discharged and one is still in our charge. 

You will notice in the report of the officer commanding ' B ' division mention 
of a daring ' hold-up ' of the Dominion Saloon in the city of Dawson. This was one of 
the most barefaced robberies committed in this territory. Two men have been arrested 
who, we are almost sure, are the principals in the affair. 

The vagrancy law has lately been strongly enforced, and I am pleased to report that 
through this means a large number of the undesirable characters, who usually congre- 
gate in the mining districts, have been got rid of, the majority of them preferring to 
leave the country altogether than to put in a few months on the now proverbial ' wood- 
pile ' or ' royal fuel factory.' 

CANTEENS. 

The canteens of both divisions are a great boon to the men. In addition to get- 
ting articles at almost cost price, the men get the benefit of any profits, and spend 
pleasant evenings in barracks, instead of having to go to town to pass away the time. 

The stock carried is necessaril}" a large one, as there are only about four months in 
the year when supplies can be brought in. Insurance is carried on the stores at Dawson 
and White Horse. 

CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE. 

With the exception of one or two cases, the general conduct of all ranks has been 
very satisfactory. The fact that beer has been permitted in the canteens has helped 
matters considerabl}^ in keeping the men from going to the towns and getting themselves 
into trouble by drinking the ' hootch ' sold over many of the bars. 

CENSUS. 

In taking the census of the Yukon Territory during the past summer, the census 
Commissioner, Major H. J. Woodside, was afforded all the assistance applied for. A 
number of the members of the force were appointed enumerators, the larger number in 
the White Horse district. 

DEATHS. 

I am very pleased to be able to report under this heading, that no deaths have 
occurred amongst the members of the force serving in the Yukon territory during the 
past year. 

DRILL AND TRAINING. 

Both divisions were put through a course of physical drill during the summer, and 
foot drills were held quite regularh^ » 

Maxim Gun squads were thoroughly drilled in both divisions. 

Communication drill for N. C. officers w^as continued in ' B ' division throughout 
the summer. The N. C. officers of ' H ' division were also put through a course. 

Recruit drill was held daily, as some of the men sent up from the North-west 



Territories were badly in need of it. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT WOOD 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

DETACHMENTS. 



The detachments at Tagish and McClintock were withdrawn and the Miles Canyon 
detachment increased, as the work done by the first mentioned in preventing the smug- 
ghng of Hquor could be better controlled at the Canyon. The buildings at both Tagish 
and McClintock have been left so that they can be re-occupied when necessary. 

The Caribou detachment patrols the Tagish district during the season of naviga- 
tion with the Alco- Vapor launch ' Tagish '. This detachment also convoys liquor ship- 
ments for Atlin to the boundary of British Columbia. 

All the river detachments have been kept very busy collecting dues on timber and 
cordwood cut at the various camps. 



Owing to the great influex of people into the Big Salmon mining district, it 



was 
cor- 
the 



found necessary to establish a detachment at Livingstone Creek, consisting of one 
poral and two men. Good buildings were erected and supplies taken in during 
summer. 

A detachment was established at Glacier Creek on the Dalton Trail and was made 
a port of entry for customs. One constable was stationed there to attend to the 
Customs work but as no one passed that way it was considered advisable to with- 
draw him. 

The miners and others on Eureka Creek forwarded a petition through the Gold 
Commissioner in March last, asking for a detachment of police at that place. Insp. 
McDonell was sent out to investigate and to report whether or not one was required. 
On his recommendation a detachment of one N. C. O. and two men was established 
there. Comfortable buildings were erected and supplies sent out. 

The winter detachments at Montague and Chico on the Cut-off trail have again 
been opened, and the detachments at Big and Little Salmon closed, until the opening of 
navigation. 

The detachment at Forty Mile was moved to the opposite side of the river, as all 
the stores, saloons and settlers were located on that side. 

A new detachment has been established at Minto on the Yukon River between 
Hootchiku and Selkirk. It was found that the distance between these two detach- 
ments was too long for the winter patrols. 

A large amount of work has been done by the detachments during the past year 
and each and every one is deserving of great praise. 



DISTRIBUTION, NOVEMBER 30, 1901. 



B Division 
H Division 



Total strength. 





1 


■gCQ 

< 


1^ 


1 


. 


2 

1 
t 


5 
3 


2 
2 


5 
3 


7 
7 


11 

8 


3 


8 


4 


8 


14 


19 






95 


22 


71 


6 


166 


28 



152 
ini 



3 I 253 



Up to the time the contingents returned from South Africa we were very short of 
officers, N. C. officers and constables, but we are now, I am glad to say, quite up to our 



strength. 



FORAGE. 



The hay and oats supplied by the Upper Yukon Consolidated Company, Ltd., are 
of good quality. A small portion was unavoidably damaged in transit. 



10 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

FUEL AND LIGHT. 

Contracts for the supply of firewood for the Territory were awarded to D. G. 
Stewart, for Dawson, at $12 per cord, and to Hugh McKinnon, for White Horse, at #7 
per cord. 

Native coal is used in a few of the buildings at Dawson, which is supplied by the 
N. A. T. & T. Co., at the rate of $25 per ton, screened. 

Contracts had to be let for the supply of firewood at the Grand Forks, Dominion, 
Hunker and Selkirk Detachments. 

The headquarters of both divisions are now lighted by electricity, which is proving 
very satisfactory and greatly lessens the danger of fire. All detachments use coal oil, 
the contract for the supply of the Dawson district being let to Messrs. Lewin Bros., at 
a fixed rate of $1 per gallon. 

HEALTH. 

On May 8 last, a telegraphic despatch from the officer commanding ' H ' Division 
informed me of the fact that considerable small-pox was reported at J^itka, Alaska and 
adjacent points ; also that the steamer Senator had been quarantined at Townsend. 
Supt. Snyder went to Skagway to confer with the United States officials with regard to 
an adequate quarantine should it become necessary to put one in force. After consulta- 
tion with the commissioner, I wired to Supt. Snyder that if any small-pox occurred at 
Skagwa}^ to notify me at once, and have Asst.-Surg. Pare establish a quarantine there. 
The director general of public health was communicated with by the commissioner, and 
the quarantine was established at Skagway on receipt of a wire stating that three cases 
had broken out. These turned out not to be serious — all recovered. The quarantine 
was raised on July 15. On July 17, I received a communication from the Comptroller 
stating that Dr. Cameron had been appointed quarantine inspector for Log Cabin. 

A case of measles Avas discovered at White Horse, the patient being a woman of ill- 
fame. The house was quarantined by Asst. -Surgeon Pare, and was raised after all 
infection had passed. 

The following shows the number of births, marriages and deaths registered in the 
Yukon during the year :— 

Births 125 

Marriages ... 116 

Deaths 208 

Of the latter seventy-six were Indians, the chief cause of deatli among them being 
consumption. 

A large number of deaths were brought about b}^ accidents in the mines, drownings, 
&c. Pneumonia was the prevailing cause of death during the winter months. 

INDIANS. 

Small parties of Indians are scattered throughout the Territory, by far the greater 
number being on the Dalton Trail. Small settlements exist at Dalton House, Caribou 
Crossing, Tagish Houses, McClintock, Upper LaBarge, Moosehide and Forty Mile. 
The natives on the Dalton Trail are self supporting, but those at the other places named 
have hard work to obtain a living by fishing and hunting, as the game has been driven 
far back into the mountains. The older people frequently have to be supplied with 
medical attendance, medicines and food. Our assistant surgeons attend them in illness 
and the food and drugs come from our stores. When possible they are issued to the 
missionaries in charge and distributed by them. We take receipts and the value of the 
articles issued is recovered in Ottawa from the Indian Department. 

The Indians, generally speaking, are a well behaved lot, but of course are easily led 
into drinking, gambling, etc. Quite a few cases have been tried for supplying liquor to 



REPORT OF ISUPERINTENDENT WOOD 11 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Indians and of Indians for being drunk. In ever}- instance the one who suppHed the 
liquor was dealt Avith to the full extent of the law. 

LAUNCHES. 

The launches Gladys and Jessie cannot be used on the river owing to the swift cur- 
rent, the machinery not being powerful enough to stem the current, and the draught 
being too great to get over shallow places. 

I fully endorse the recommendation of the officer commanding ' H ' Division as to 
their disposal and the purchase of a good powerful stern-wheeler to replace them. The 
cost of running would not amount to more than the cost of keeping the two launches in 
commission, and there would be a great saving to the Government in freight charges for 
the various river detachments, which amounts to considerable during the year. I am 
satisfied that a boat of this kind would more than pay for itself in two seasons, it 
would be an immense convenience besides saving considerable expenditure. 

LIQUOR PERxMITS AND LICENSES. 

Ale, wine and spirits amounting to 65,591 J gallons were imported into the Yukon 
Territory via the White Pass and Yukon route during the year. This liquor was tested 
by the Customs authorities and measured by the police. 

MEANS OF COMMUNICATION. 

With the completion of the through telegraph line it was expected we should be in 
daily communication with the 'outside' but such has not been the case so far; the line 
worked for a few days after it was completed and then went down only to pop up again 
for a few hours. It is expected, and hoped, that before long the line will be always in 
good working order. It was completed on September 25, and is about 2,000 miles long. 
The construction was a great undertaking and many difficulties had to be overcome. 

Three new first class steamers and a large freight boat purchased from the N. C. 
Co., were placed on the Upper Yukon by the B. Y. N. Co., last year. All the freight 
contracted for by the company was easily handled. 

Quite a number of scows and small boats loaded with freight, which had been 
hauled over the ice some distance down the river, came in early in the season, but once 
the steamers were able to move the smaller craft became scarce in comparison with 
former years. 

It is estimated that 36,400 tons of freight came to Dawson during the open season 
of navigation, about 14,000 tons having entered via St. Michaels. 

Some 4,000 more people left the country than came in, but, of course, a good num- 
ber of these have gone out for the winter only, and will return in the spring. 

Navigation opened on May 14, and the ice stopped running on November 12. 

It is reported that in the near future a network of railroads will be running out of 
Dawson, connecting with the principal creeks. The construction of these railroads will 
greatly reduce the cost of machinery, food stuffs, etc., and will give emplojTuent to a 
number of people. It now costs !$12 per ton to get freight to Grand Forks, 830 to 
Dominion and Sulphur, $40 to Gold Run and $80 to Eureka. These are winter rates 
when the trails are good ; in summer when trails are bad, rates are higher. Freight from 
the Coast to Dawson costs from $95 to S215 per ton, according to class. Average $145. 

Winter travel over the rivers and Jakes has hardly commenced owing to the 
dangerous condition of the ice in places, but the weather is now turning colder and it 
will only take a short time to make it safe. It is expected that there will be consider- 
able traffic over the ice between Dawson and White Horse, and the stage owners and 
roadhouse keepers are making great preparations. The B. Y. N. Co. will run two 
stages per week each way, in connection with the mail service and will increase this if 
business warrants it. Last season they ran on a five and a half days schedule. There 
are at least three other stage companies in the field and there will probably be more. 



12 NOB TH- WEST MO UNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Freight rates over the ice this winter will be 30 cents per pound, last winter the 
charge was 40 cents. 

Stage fare from here to White Horse, meals not included, is $125. 

MAILS. 

The through mail service, with the exception of the period between the close of 
navigation and until the ice is safe, and during the spring break-up, is all that could be 
desired. Numerous complaints, however, were made by the different detachments along 
the river of mail beats not stopping to deliver letters. This could be remedied by the 
company having a competent man on each mail boat to attend to this matter, instead of 
leaving it to the purser, whose time is taken up with other duties. 

The only way to get mail in, during the seasons of the year when th^re is no safety 
in travelling on the river, i'^ to build an overland trail, which, I understand, is quite 
feasible. 

A good mail service is supplied most of the creeks (Dawson district) by the 
different stage lines. 

Our patrols from Hootalinqua to Livingstone Creek carry a fortnightly mail to the 
latter place. The suggestion was made by Post Office Inspector Fletcher to Supt. 
Snyder, and on his recommendation I authorized the same. 

A post office has lately been established at Porcupine, a mining camp on the 
American side of the boundary, near the Dal ton Trail Post. 

PATROLS. 

The monthly patrol between Dalton Trail Post and Five Fingers was carried out 
during the past summer, but the reports show nothing jof any great interest to relate 
except that the first patrol over the trail found a prospector named D. W. Dawson of 
Pictou, N.S., at the Dalton cache, sick and destitute. He was supplied with provisions 
and on the return of the patrol they took him to the Dalton House. His story was that 
he left White Horse with two companions named Lamb and Laird on April 1st last, 
and when he was taken sick on the trail they left him with some provisions and said 
they would send an Indian for him on their arrival at Dalton House ; this they failed 
to do, and did not even mention the fact to the police at that point. 

A patrol from Hootalinqua to Teslin Lake and Teslin City was made by canoe in 
August and September last. Corpl. Ackland who was in charge of the patrol, made a 
very interesting report of the trip which will be mentioned in the report of the officer 
commanding H Division. 

Extensive patrols have been made during the year covering the whole of the Dalton 
Trail District. 

The winter patrol between Dawson and White Horse was discontinued on April 
30 owing to the dangerous condition of the ice. It was again started on November 25. 

All the detachments were kept busy during the winter carrying freight, looking 
for missing people, kc. 

The regular system of patrols on the creeks has been kept up, and the whole dis- 
trict thoroughly looked after. 

The McQuestin District has been thoroughly patrolled ; one party of police 
travelled from that detachment across country to Selkirk. 

The usual day and night patrols are kept up in the towns of Dawson and White 
Horse ; both places are kept in a very orderly manner. 

Several parties on special dutj^ have been sent both up and down the river hunting 
for people reported missing, and the whole territory, from one end to the other, has 
never been so thoroughly patrolled before. 

PAY, 

Under this heading I can only repeat my recommendation of last yestx ; the same 
remarks apply as you will observe from the number of men who have taken their dis- 
charge at the expiration of their term of service, owing to the poor rate of pay. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT WOOD 15 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

PENITENTIARY. 

At the present time the poHce guardroom is used both as common jail and terri- 
torial penitentiary. There are usually between thirty and forty short-term prisoners, 
but at times we have as many as fifty-five or sixty. It can be readily understood what 
a number of policemen it takes to guard such a lot of criminals, night and day, especially 
when one considers that during the winter the outside work is performed, for the greater' 
part, in darkness. The prisoners are, as a rule, very bad characters, and a close watck 
has to be kept on them. There is no jail enclosure in which they can work, so they are 
sent out in gangs of two with a constable in charge. During the greater part of the 
day the latter carries a lantern in order to be able to see and closely watch his men. 

We have now twenty-three convicts under our charge, serving sentences varying 
from life to three years. These are kept in a separate ward from the common prisoners, 
but otherwise are under the same rules and .regulations as to discipline and working 
hours. These criminals are of a desperate class, and as most of them have long terms 
to serve (three of them for life) they will not hesitate to seize the slightest chance to 
escape. They also have to be kept at work anywhere in the vicinity of the barracks 
during hours of darkness, owing to our not having any proper enclosure such as peniten- 
tiaries have. It is not reasonable to hold the force responsible for the safe-keeping of 
these convicts, as we have neither the proper* means nor appliances. Their place of con- 
finement is a log building with wooden cells, in a double row down the centre, leaving a 
passage all round. 

Until lately the green lumber of which the cells were built had shrunk so that there 
were cracks one-quarter of an inch wide between cells. Notes were being passed, and 
whispered conversations held between the convicts. I would strongly advise that these 
convicts be sent out to New Westminster penitentiary, where there are the proper means, 
and appliances for looking after them. It should not be difficult to obtain permission 
from the U. S. authorities to take them through Skagway, considering the fact that 
our Government permits prisoners from Alaska to pass through the Yukon to the peni- 
tentiaries at Seattle and San Francisco. 

POLICE COURT. 

The police court at Dawson was taken over by Police Magistrate C. D. Macaulay 
soon after his arrival in September last, and the police court at White Horse by Police 
Magistrate G. H. Taylor in the same month, thus relieving my officers of a vast amount 
of magisterial work. They still attend to these duties on the creeks and outside places. 

I wish to place on record the hearty support afforded us by both police magistrates. 

RELIEF TO PERSONS IN DISTRESS. 

You will observe from the report of the officers commanding divisions that a large 
amount of relief has been given to indigents. None but those actually in need have 
been assisted, as a thorough inquiry into the affairs of the person asking for help is 
always made before any action is taken. 

RECREATION. 

Under the heading of buildings I have recommended the erection of a room for 
recreation purposes, as at present the only place available is that used for the canteen. 
The room is very small, and with the billiard table, card table and piano there is no 
room to move around, and of course it is no place for one to sit down to read owing to 
the continual noise. 

A skating rink has been built in the barrack inclosure, and now the cold weather 
has come, and the ice good, it is a source of great amusement and exercise to all. A 
hockey club has been formed in the Division and has already won its first game. Last 
year the Division hockey team had very poor luck, but now with the infusion of new 
blood I hope to see them do well. 
28—10 



14 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

No illustrated papers or magazines have been received for some time, but this is 
due to the fact that no mails have been received since the end of October. 
Local papers are supplied to both divisions. 

ROADS, TRAILS AND BRIDGES. 

The Dominion Government and the Yukon Council built about 100 miles of road 
connecting the different creeks during the year, making now a total of 218 miles of 
road in operation. The council also constructed 21 miles of trail. This is a great boon 
to miners and others, as, consequently, freight rates have been reduced considerably. 

The bridge over the Klondike River, named ' Ogilvie,' after the late commissioner, 
Wm. Ogilvie, Esq., is a fine structure and is a great convenience to all. Formerly a 
ferry was used for which a toll was charged by the owner, and at certain times of the 
year was not available at all. A substantial bridge was also built over the creek at 
Grand Forks. 

All other bridges have been thoroughly repaired and in some cases widened. 

• SCHOOLS. 

Seven school districts have been created with eleven teachers in all. These were 
made necessary by the large influx of children during the past two years. 

The new school building in the town of Dawson is as modern as it is possible to 
have and would be a credit to any city. 

YUKON FURS. 

The principal furs taken in this territory are black, silver tip, brown, cinnamon 
and grizzly bear, beaver, otter, marten, mink, foxes of the black, silver grey, cross and 
red variety, lynx, and black and gray wolf. 

The principal hunting districts are the Hootalinqua, Stewart River, Pelly, White 
River, Porcupine and Peel River, the latter being, apparently, the choicest hunting 
ground. 

There is a large number of hunters (estimated at 1,000, exclusive of Indians) all 
over the territory, and all apparentl}^ are successful. A number of them take their furs 
outside to dispose of, while others sell to the large dealers here. 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

The sad news of the death of Her Most Gracious Majesty, Queen Victoria, cast a 
gloom over the whole territory, as did also the death of President Wm. McKinle}^. 
Memorial services w^ere held in both cases, the division attending in a body. Another 
death which I regret to have to record is that of Mr. J. C. McCook, until recently the 
U. S. consul at Dawson. 

You will observe that a large number of deaths have taken place through accident. 
These are gone into fully in the reports of both officers commanding divisions. The 
majority of the accidents happened at the mines, but no more than is usual in a mining 
community. An ordinance has lately been passed providing for the protection of 
miners, and an inspector of mines appointed to examine the mines and see they are in 
a safe condition to work in. 

A new, and to all appearances, very satisfactory fire alarm system has been intro- 
duced in Dawson, one of the call boxes being placed in the barracks. 

The town of Dawson will be incorporated in the near future, to be managed b}^ a 
mayor and aldermen, or by three commissioners appointed by the council. 

The Hon. Wm. Ogilvie resigned the commissionership of the territory in the early 
part of the year, and the Hon. J. H. Ross was appointed in his place, arriving here in 
March. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Z. T. WOOD, 
Supt. Commanding Yukon District. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT SNYDER 15 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



APPENDIX A. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT A. E. SNYDER, WHITE HORSE. 

North-west Mounted Police, White Horse, Y.T., November 20, 1901. 

The Officer Commanding 

North-west Mounted PoHce, 

Yukon Territory, Dawson. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the annual report of ' H ' Division for the year 
1901.— 

In accordance with a telegram received from the Assistant Commissioner, at Regina, 
to proceed at once to Vancouver and take first boat for Skagway for temporary duty at 
White Horse, I left Edmonton on March 6, proceeding to Vancouver, where I received 
written instructions from the Assistant Commissioner to proceed to White Horse and 
take over from Supt. Primrose the command of ' H ' Division until further orders. 

At Vancouver I was joined by Inspector McGinnis, who was also detailed for 
temporary duty in ' H ' Division. We were delayed a couple of days at Vancouver, 
there being no boat for Skagway. 

I arrived at White Horse on March 1 5, and took over the Division from Supt. Primrose 
on the 19th. On the 22nd, Supt. Primrose and Inspector Cosby left for Dawson. 

Inspector McGinnis returned to the Territories on August 3. While in ' H ' 
Division, he performed the duties of acting quartermaster, which at that time were very 
arduous, there being then a large quantity of stores and very inadequate, or practically no 
storehouse accommodation, the bulk of the stores being piled in the square. 

Inspector Howard arrived from the North-west Territories on transfer to ' H ' 
Division on June 3. On June 15, he proceeded to Dawson, having been ordered there 
by the Officer Commanding, Yukon Territory, returning for duty in ' H ' Division on 
July 2. 

Inspector Jarvis on his return from South Africa resumed charge of the Dalton 
Trail Detachments. On November 11, he arrived at White Horse en route to ' B ' 
Division, having bean ordered there by the Officer Commanding, Yukon Territory, after 
having on November 3, handed over the Dalton Trail Detachments to Assistant 
Surgeon Fraser. 

On June 1, I was transferred from 'G' to ' H' Division and on July 1, I was 
promoted to the rank of Superintendent. 

ACCIDENTS AND DEATHS. 

On^December 6, 1900, w^ord was received that Const. Burman of the Stikine 
Detachment had cut his foot badly while on patrol, and had come to Wrangel to see a 
doctor. He was laid up at Wrangel for three weeks, and returned to his Detachment 
in January his foot completely healed, and none the worse for the accident. 

Three Indians, at Chico and Montagu on the CD. Cut-off, died during the month 
of December from exposure. The Police at those points examined the bodies, found 
that they had not died of any infectious disease, and allowed the relatives to proceed 
with the bodies, forwarding death certificates to headquarters. 

On December 10, a wire was received from Corporal Acland at Hootalinqua, 

reporting the death of one William Edward O'Brien, a woodchopper of Hootalinqua, 

after a short illness. It appeared that the man only came into the country in October 

and went to work for his brother at Big Salmon, but he seemed to be taken sick almost 

28—101 



16 NORTH-Wl^ST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

immediately, and gradually getting worse, ihery tried to take him to White Horse to see 
a doctor, but he got so weak upon reaching Hootalinqua, that he had to remain there, 
where he died in two or three days. His brother passed through White Horse on his 
way out with the body, and a death certificate was given to Assistant Surgeon Pafe, 
which was forwarded to the Registrar. 

On December 27, Sergt. Barker at Five Fingers Detachment, reported that Const. 
Kramer had accidentally shot himself in the knee, but that no bones were broken. 
Assistant Surgeon Madore, who was stationed at Selkirk, was at once telegraphed for, 
and he proceeded to Five Fingers, he wired from there that Const. Kramer would be laid 
up for five or six weeks, and advised his removal to the Police Hospital at White Horse. 
Instructions were issued accordingly and a dog team sent from here to meet him, in 
order that he might not be exposed any longer than was absolutely necessary. It 
appeared that Const. Kramer had come in off patrol and laid his revolver on the table, 
shortly afterwards, from some cause unknown, the revolver fell on the floor and exploded, 
the bullet entering his leg near the knee, and coming out in his thigh four inches higher 
up. He was returned to duty after some weeks in hospital apparently none the worse,^ 
the Assistant Surgeon reporting that no permanent disability was sustained. 

A man named Edwin Lister reported at the barracks here on January 11, that his 
partner John Hamilton, had left their camp early in the morning of the 9 th, and had not 
returned up to that time, when Lister left the camp to inform the police. As the morn- 
ing of the 9th, had been very stormy, there was a strong presumption that Hamilton had 
lost his way, and as the storm had continued for two days, there was a great probability 
that he was unable to locate himself and find his way back. Const. Horsman with dog 
team was detailed to accompany Lister and both set out same day (11th,) to endeavour 
to find some trace of the missing man. They both returned the next morning, report- 
ing that a blizzard was blowing on the mountains and that it was quite impossible to 
proceed with dogs. On the morning of the 13th, Const. Randall and Lister, on snow- 
shoes, were sent out to continue the search, and after three days' careful search they 
returned, reporting non-success. They stated that the weather was very stormy all the 
time they were out, the snow drifting heavily. Up to date no trace of this man has 
ever been discovered, and there seems no reason to doubt, but that he was buried in a 
snowdrift all winter, as he left the camp for the purpose of going on a short hunt and 
did not take any food with him. He left no efiects nor clue to his identity, his partner 
not knowing anything about him beyond his mere name, they being together but a short 
time. 

On February 10, a half-breed child, belonging to Mr. Shallow of Caribou, died of 
pneumonia at that place ; she had been sick for some time and had been looked after by 
an Indian woman named Mary ; she was taken to Tagish for burial. A certificate and 
cause of death was forwarded to the Registrar at Dawson. 

A man named J. P. Schultz died at White Horse on April 30, from rheumatism or 
rheumatic fever. He had been ill in a tent for some time, and had been removed from 
there to the Public Hospital, where he died the next day. His body was forwarded to 
Skagway for burial by the Society of Elks, and his efiects were taken in charge, sold 
and proceeds sent to the Public Administrator, Dawson. Certificate and cause of death 
was forwarded the Registrar. 

A man named E. J. Dougherty died also on April 30, from apoplexy. He was 
employed on the new steamers, that were constructed by the B. Y. N. Company at that 
time. His efiects were taken in charge, also a balance of $103.28 standing to his credit 
at the company's office. His effects were sold, with the exception of a few trinkets 
retained, and forwarded to his wife, and the proceeds sent to the Public Administrator, 
Dawson. Captain Waldo in charge of construction of the steamers forwarded his body 
to Mrs. Dougherty at Portland, Oregon, at his own expense. 

On May 1 1 , some pa rties loading their boats at the dock here, found the body of 
a man underneath the dock buried in the mud with the exception of one foot. The 
body was taken up and an inquest held. It proved to be that of one Frank Schlagg 
and the jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned"; there was no evidence pro- 
duced pointing to any foul play. Tae body was interred here and the Public Admin- 
istrator notified, a certificate of death was forwarded the Registrar. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT SNYDER 17 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

In the early part of May a Bohemian named Yodka, while going down Thirty Mile 
river on a raft, got caught in an ice jam and narrowly escaped with his life. His whole 
outfit was lost and he was completely without means. He was put to work on the new 
detachment building at Hootalinqua in return for his board, until the river was open to 
Five Fingers, which was his original destination. He was then given five days' rations 
a,nd started off for Five Fingers, where he worked all summer on the coal mine. 

Constable Christiansen, who was in charge of the Upper Labarge Detachment, 
reported in June that a man (name unknown) was lost off a scow near that place. It 
was supposed that he fell overboard and was drowned, as one of the crew heard a splash 
but thought nothing of it. No trace of the identity of this man could be found. 

On June 22, two men, Valentine and Kickstead, were drowned five miles below 
White Horse by the upsetting of a canoe. Their scow w^as stuck on a sandbar, and they 
with two others were in a canoe trying to get it off, the canoe upset and two of the men 
swam ashore, the other two were drowned. One body was recovered on July 5, five 
miles above Upper Labarge, the other was recovered later on in the month. Inspector 
Horrigan was sent down to hold an inquest, but after examining the bodies he did not 
deem it necessary and gave orders for their burial. The effects of Ole Rickstead were 
taken in charge and forwarded to the Public Administrator, Dawson. Dave Valentine 
left no effects. The usual certificates and cause of death were forwarded the Registrar, 
Dawson. 

On June 29, a man named John Peabody, during a storm on Bennett Lake, lost 
three scows. They drifted on the rocks about three miles from Caribou and were totally 
wrecked. 

On the morning of June 19, a man named John W. Lowes was drowned off a scow 
at Freeman's Point twelve miles below Big Salmon. The scow took the wrong channel 
and struck a rock. The shock swept Lowes from his sweep into the water. He rose 
to the surface some forty feet further down and then sank. A search was maintained 
for his body w^hich was found on July 14, three miles south of the Little Salmon Detach* 
ment. The body was buried on the 17th, three hundred yards north of the detachment. 
His brother living in Sandon, British Columbia, was communicated with and a statement 
of his effects forwarded him. The effects were sold, and the proceeds, together with the 
cash found on his person forwarded to the Public Administrator, Dawson. The usual 
certificate of death was forwarded the registrar. 

Boat No. 3179 was found capsized and empty near the Big Salmon detachment in 
the latter part of July. The detachments down the river, and the officer commanding 
' B ' division were notified, but no trace that I have heard of was seen of any bodies or 
baggage. 

On the night of August 11, Michael Sullivan, a prisoner undergoing a term of four 
months' imprisonment for the theft of a tent, died in the police hospital at this post, he 
was admitted to the hospital on July 23, suffering from typho-pneumonia, he had been 
ailing for some time previous to this and was a complete physical wreck. His friends in 
Stanley, New Brunswick, were notified of his death. He left no effects. Certificate 
and cause of death was forwarded to the Registrar, Dawson. 

On August 10, a wire was received from Lower LaBarge saying that a waiter on 
the steamer Wilbur Crimmon had disappeared, asking that inquiries be made about him 
in White Horse. He was missed by the men on the steamer shortly after leaving White 
Horse. A search was made in the town here but no trace of him could be found. On 
the 31st, Const. Farquharson arrived from Upper LaBarge and reported finding a body 
in the river near that place. Inspector Horrigan was sent down to hold an inquest but 
after viewing the remains considered it unnecessary. The body was identified as that 
of Timotheus Leonard the waiter on the Wilbur Crimmoii. The body was buried at 
Upper LaBarge and efforts are being made to locate his friends with a view to notifying 
them. His effects were taken charge of and the money due him by the B. Y. N. Com- 
pany was forwarded to the Public Administrator, Dawson. Certificate of death was for- 
warded the Registrar. 

A Mr. W. A. Pike arrived at the Stikine detachment on August 21, and reported 
that a squaw by the name of Mrs. Porter was drowned out of a canoe while going up 



18 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

the Stikine river from Glenora to Telegraph creek on July 23. The body from last 
accounts had not been recovered. 

A man named Chas. Johnson was fatally injured on October 11, while working on 
the steamer Yukoner, which was being hauled up on the ways. John.son was working 
on one of the windlasses, in a crouching position under the sweep. He stood up to take 
a kink out of the cable to clear the slack end, and evidently did not hear the order given 
for the teams to go ahead, and not crouching under the sweep was jammed between it 
and the windlass. He was taken to the public hospital where he died at 7 a.m. on the 
following morning. His effects were taken charge of, and the wages due him collected 
from the B. Y. N. Company and forwarded to the Public Administrator, and certificate 
of death also forwarded the Registrar, Dawson. 

The steamer Goddard was totally wrecked and three lives lost on Lake LaBarge on 
October 12. The following account of the disaster was received from one of the sur- 
vivors, engineer Julius Stockfield. ' The crew was composed of Capt. Edward McDonald, 
of Aberdeen, Wash., myself, as engineer ; Fay Ransom of Montana, as cook ; and John 
Thompson of Johnson St., Victoria, as fireman. There was also on board a woodchopper 
named Snyder. 

' It was at least an hour and a half after the boat parted company with the scows 
that the accident occurred. For some time previous to the disaster the boat had been 
labouring in a heavy sea, the waves rising to a height of at least twelve feet, and in 
plunging over these the steering gear would often be out of the water thus rendering 
the boat unmanageable. In passing over one of these heavy swells the vessel broached 
and turned sideways in the trough of the sea, and being struck by an extra violent puff 
of wind turned over. It had been apparent for some time previous to this that the 
vessel could not outlive the storm except by a miracle, and Thompson the fireman had 
become so unmanned by fear that I had to perform his work as well as my own. One 
of the fires had been put out by the water and shortly after the other suffered the same 
fate. I saw there was no use trying to do any more, so crawled over the hurricane deck 
into the bow of the boat. Thompson was at this time on his knees praying and when 
he saw me he implored me to save him. I threw off his shoes and threw overboard an 
armfull of cord wood and yelled at him to jump overboard and catch on to the wood, at 
the same time plunging over myself. I started to swim for shore but could not make 
any headway and turned back in hope of being able to catch a piece of wreckage. When 
I started to swim for shore I saw McDonald, Ranson and Snyder on the bottom of the 
overturned boat, and on my return saw that they had been washed off and that McDonald 
and Snyder had managed to reach the pilot house and were clinging to it while Ransom 
had hold of a piece of wreckage and appeared to be doing all right. I finally got hold 
of two pieces of cordwood, and being a strong swimmer struck out for shore with the 
hop^ of being able to reach it and send assistance. After two hours' desperate struggle, 
I got within 200 feet of the shore in an exhausted condition, where I was seen by 
Messrs. Clarke and Ironside and assisted to shore, and, after vigorous measures, was 
restored to life. I told them the story of the wreck, and they went a mile and a half 
down the lake, got a boat and started for the scene of the accident. They found Snyder 
lying unconscious in one corner of the pilot house, which was about three-quarters of a 
mile out in the lake. Capt. McDonald and Ransome had disappeared. On his restora- 
tion Snyder said the pilot house rolled and pitched so much in the heavy seas that it 
was a hard matter to hold on, and that in a short time Capt. McDonald had complained 
of the cold and shouted to Snyder, ' Hold on, if you can,' was soon after washed off and 
disappeared. 

' The lake was patrolled continuously until the close of navigation with a view to 
.finding these bodies, but no sign of them could be seen, and the probabilities are that 
they will not be seen until next spring, in the lower river, if then. The manager of the 
XJ. Y. C. Co., the owners of the steamer, has communicated with their different rela- 
tives, and as they had only been hired a day or so there were no wages due them. They 
left no effects. 

On the arrival of the steamer Bailie on the morning of October 10 from Dawson, 
one of the passengers, W. H. Nelson, who was en route to California, his home, was 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT SNYDER 19 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

taken to the public hospital suffering from typhoid fever. He died at 11 p.m., on the 
1 2th, and was buried here. As he was in destitute circumstances the expenses of burial 
were defrayed and accounts forwarded the commissioner, Yukon Territory. Certificate 
of death was forwarded the Begistrar, Dawson. 

George Marten, a fireman on the steamer Dawson, disappeared suddenly on the 
morning of October 1 8, from which date he has not been heard of. There seems very 
little reason to doubt but that he fell into the river and was drowned. He was born in 
Harbour Grace, Newfoundland, and is supposed to be 26 years old. He came to White 
Horse about eight months ago and since that time, to the date of his disappearance, was 
in the employ of the B. Y. N. Company. His father, mother and sister are supposed to 
be living in Montreal, Quebec. His effects were taken in charge, and all cash that he 
w^as in possession of, or coming to him as wages, was forwarded to the Public Adminis- 
trator, Dawson. 

Ernest Williams, a young man about twenty-five years of age, and known by his 
associates as the ' Skagway Kid,' while helping to load a scow on the water front, on 
Saturday, October 19, fell overboard and was drowned. One of his fellow labourers 
managed to catch his coat with a boat-hook, but the cloth gave way and the swift cur- 
rent quickly bore him out of sight. He left no effects. 



ASSISTANCE TO OTHER DEPARTMENTS. 

Crown Tmiher and Mining Department. 

All detachments on the river collect the permit and timber dues on all wood cut 
for fuel for the different steamboat companies. 

Frequent patrols were made, all wood camps visited, wood piles measured, and the 
proper amount of dues collected. 

Corporal Acland, who has charge of the Livingstone Creek detachment, is a com- 
missioner for taking affidavits, issues free miners' certificates, and is sub-mining recorder 
for that part. 

Customs. 

Assistant Surgeon Fraser performed the duties of collector of customs in the Dalton 
Trail District. The amount collected this year is considerably in arrears of last year, 
consequent on the falling oft' in the number of miners and prospectors entering that dis- 
trict. Constable Hume acted as sub-collector at the Wells detachment collecting small 
amounts occasionally during the year. 

In the early part of the year one constable assisted the Customs Department at the 
Summit, and one at Bennett. On White Horse being made a port of entry in April, 
with Mr. Menzies as collector, Constable Mullan was appointed sub-collector at the 
Summit. Constable Scribner acted as landing waiter at White Horse during the year 
until the close of navigation. 

The constable at Bennett was removed early in the summer. 



Public Works Department. 

Assistance was given Mr. J. B. Tache from White Horse to Dawson by our patrols 
and detachments during January last. He wired from Lower LeBarge asking if his 
horse might be returned to White Horse by the patrol, which was done. 

Telegraphs. 

A constable assisted the lineman at Tagish during the month of January. The same 
month a constable was detailed to assist the lineman at White Horse to repair the line. 



20 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

A constable was detailed to assist the lineman during the month of July at White 
Horse and east of here. The detachment at Tantalus repaired several breaks during 
the year. 

A staff sergeant acted as telegraph operator during the year at Tantalus. 

Department of the Interior. 

A band of horses belonging to this department was turned out at Tagish for the 
winter. They were inspected regularly by the detachment at that place. Sergt. Jones, 
in charge of that detachment, reported that they were in a very bad state and would 
never survive the winter. Instructions were issued to him to purchase hay and take 
them up and feed them, which was accordingly done. 

Accoutrements^ 

The division is still armed with the Winchester carbine. The majority of them 
are badly honeycombed, and a number of them are out of repair, and cannot be repaired 
here, owing to having no armourer in the Yukon. 

The Enfield revolver is still in use, and, as reported last year, is far too heavy 
to be carried by men driving dogs. 

Some Smith & Wesson revolvers are badly needed. They were asked for last year. 

Twenty Lee-Metford carbines were received from ' B ' division, Dawson, this year. 

There are 110 Enfield revolvers and 130 Winchester carbines in the division. 

I would urgently request that the division be supplied with the Lee-Metford 
carbine. 

BARRACK BUILDINGS. 

Since last report the work of buildings left unfinished owing to the winter having 
set in has been completed, namely, all the buildings shingled, cornices, corners, base- 
boards and weather boards put on. In addition there has been erected quarters for 
Assistant Surgeon Pare, two story, 24 x 26, with kitchen 16 x 16, the whole finished 
and papered throughout. A log supply store, one and a half stories, 25 x 80, built by 
our own men. A division store 25 x 75, built of logs, to contain harness room, saddler's 
shop and storehouse for hay, &c. A pump house, one and a half story frame building, 
25 X 40, to contain washroom and lavatories, a building that was badly needed as the pre- 
sent washroom is in the men's quarters next the mess room, which I consider is very 
unhealthy. This latter is a frame building, and the material used is largely that brought 
from Tagish which had been in the buildings there. A frame latrine 8x16, and an ice- 
house 16 X 24 of logs were also built. 

On detachment at Dalton Trail, quarters for Inspector Jarvis were completed. 
Also a log storehouse, both of these buildings were commenced last year. 

At Livingstone Creek, buildings and outhouses have been built for detachment. 
The principal part of the lumber used was taken in there over the ice last winter and 
spring, and the balance whipsawed by the men on the ground. This building is of logs 
with board floor, &c. 

The same style of building as at Livingstone Creek is now under course of erection 
at the following places : on the Cut-off at Lower LaBarge, which is about two and a half 
miles from the summer detachment, Chico and Montagu. These buildings are necessary, 
as in the case of the Lower LaBarge detachment the buildings and quarters are two and 
a half miles off the trail for winter work, and to get to the trail it was necessary to cross 
open water in a canoe with the dogs, which was very dangerous. At Chico and 
Montagu, we were occupying rented buildings, which were very inconvenient, and so 
small that the men were unable to do their own cooking and had to board at roadhouses. 
All the above buildings are of log and erected by our own men. 

At the summer detachment at Lower LaBarge, it will be necessary first thing in 
the spring to erect new quarters, as the present buildings were erected on low marshy 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT SNYDER 21 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

ground, and have sunk to such an extent that the water rises under the floor, and the 
buildmgs are liable to fall down. I would suggest a frame building being erected at 
this place. 

When you take into consideration how short handed the division has been this last 
summer, together with the scarcity of timber, and the distance it had to be hauled, 
particularly at headquarters, you will see that the men have not been idle, and great 
praise is due them for the energetic way in which they carried out the work. 

The ground within the barrack inclosure occupied a great deal of time in cleaning 
up, as it was a very thick jack pine brule and very uneven. This was all stumped and 
the refuse burned. 

A good road was graded along the north and east sides of the barracks. 

One well started last summer, but left uncompleted and which caved in was completed, 
giving us a good supply of water for mess and barrack rooms. Another well with a good 
log well house over it to keep it from freezing was completed at the stables. Also a 
third well for use of oflicers' quarters. The water obtained is of an excellent quality, 
but I anticipate some trouble with the well dug near the messroom, from which we have 
a bountiful supply of water, as it is through quicksand which is constantly silting 
through the cribbing, it is, however, very valuable as a fire protection being so close the 
main barrack building. 

A stable was erected last winter at each of the following detachments, size 
16x18:— 

Upper LaBarge, built of logs and poles. 

Lower LaBarge " " 

Chico 

Montagu " " 

Tantalus 

Five Fingers " " 

CANTEEN. 

The canteen is beyond doubt a great benefit to the division. A great number of 
the detachments are established at points where there are neither stores or trading posts 
of any description, and it is an impossibility for the men on them to purchase 
the little necessaries of life. It was found imperative that particular attention be 
paid to the line of goods principally used by the men so situated. An ample stock of 
canned goods, such as milk, fruit, vegetables, &c., that would tend to make the authorized 
issue of rations a little more palatable, was kept on hand, and judging from the number 
of orders received during navigation from the different detachments the canteen has 
been a great boon to the men, especially from a point of health and also from a pecuni- 
ary point of view, the price of that class of goods in this country being so ruinous, and 
altogether out of reach of a policeman's pay. The same applies to headquarters, the 
canteen supplying a good many welcome additions to the division mess, which I am glad 
to state the men appreciate very much. 

CENSUS. 

The Dominion census was taken by members of this division from White Horse to 
Hoochiku. All down river detachments taking the census in their respective districts. 
They completed their returns and forwarded them to the Census Commissioner, Dawson, 
in the latter part of October. 

At White Horse and Caribou civilians were employed by the Census Commissioner. 

CONDUCT. 

The conduct of the division since I have taken over the command has been excep- 
tionally good, making allowance for the four dismissals. 



22 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD Vif., A. 1902 

CRIME. 

I am very pleased to be able to state that there were no very serious cases of crime 
during the year. I am satisfied that it was not for want of material that we were in- 
debted to such a happy state of affairs, as among the class of people continually on the 
move coming in and going out, there are quite a few that would be capable of attempt- 
ing anything if they were certain of escaping detection. I can onty attribute the lack 
or comparative utter absence of serious crime to the extreme watchfulness of our men, 
which renders it well nigh impossible for loose characters to engage in doubtful enter- 
prises and stay in the country. The (under the circumstances) speedy and condign 
punishment meted out to O'Brien elicited favourable comment from citizens generally, 
irrespective of nationality, the Americans especially commenting favourably on it, and 
contrasting it with their experience of similar incidents in other mining regions of the 
western states. 

There is one mysterious disappearance to clear up. That of a German who left 
White Horse early in October with the intention of prospecting three days about thirty 
miles from here with a companion. He left his clothes in town and was supposed to 
have in the neighbourhood of $500 in his possession. The woman (a boarding house 
keeper) with whom he left the clothes gave information to the sergeant in charge of the 
town station after the man had been away about three weeks, of the circumstances of 
the case, and although inquiries were made at all the copper mines in the vicinity of 
White Horse, no trace of the missing persons could be found, nor did anyone see them 
after leaving White Horse. Although the facts that have come to hand would point to 
the disappearance being involuntary^, still there is nothing so far to base an opinion on 
of anj^thing criminal having taken place, as they may have boarded the train at some 
station and gone to Skagway. 

On December 6 last Geo. St. Cyr was committed for trial by Supt. Primrose for the 
murder of Jas. Davis . The prisoner was removed to Dawson to stand his trial. The 
officer commanding that division will doubtless fully report on this case. 

On receipt of a wire from Sergt. Watson, in charge at Selkirk, to arrest one H. 
Dageneus, charged with defrauding roadhouses and issuing bogus cheques, Dageneus was 
arrested at McKay's roadhouse and taken down to Hoochiku, where he was handed 
over to that detachment, to be escorted to Selkirk. 

On May 9 Michael Johnston was arrested and tried at Caribou for theft. He was 
sentenced to four months' imprisonment with hard labour. This man was a railway 
navvy^, and had been stealing for some time from his fellow labourers. 

A character named ' Paddy the Pig,' wanted in Atlin since last year, was arrested 
in the town of White Horse. He was held here for ten days awaiting opening of navi- 
gation, when a provincial constable from British Columbia came and took him to Atlin. 

One F. Pvussell was arrested in June last for having stolen a pocket book containing 
$95 from J. Wilson, of the Wilson Trading Company. He was tried, pleaded guilty, and 
sentenced to six months' imprisonment with hard labour. 

In July one Orlando McCraney was arrested on a charge of theft from the person 
of one Johnson. They had been drinking together in the different hotels, and towards 
morning Johnson became very drunk. McCraney went through him in the public street 
and relieved him of a belt containing $500. McCraney was arrested at Bennett by 
Provincial Constable Desbrisay, who, instead of searching him, allowed him twelve 
hours' liberty until the arrival of our men. Of course, in the meantime, the man had 
cached the money. He was committed for trial and tried by the Hon. Justice Dugas, 
who sentenced him to two years in the penitentiary, which imprisonment he is under- 
going at this post. 

One Michael Sullivan was sentenced to four months' imprisonment with hard labour 
for the theft of a tent. This prisoner died in the hospital at this post while undergoing 
sentence. 

Detective Lane arrived here from Seattle on August 23, in quest of a man named 
Dingle, who was wanted for forgery. Dingle alias Clayton was working in one of the 
offices of the B. Y. N. Company. He must have noticed, or received information of 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT SNYDER 23 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Lane's arrival, as shortly after he went to the office and received his time check, he 
disappeared. There was a strong suspicion that he was on the steamer Canadian, 
which was under readiness to pull out for Dawson. The steamer was thoroughly- 
searched and a strict watch kept on her until she left the dock, but no trace of Dingle 
alias Clayton could be found. He, however, escaped on this boat, as on her return trip 
his time check was turned in by the purser, who no doubt aided him to escape, as his 
name did not appear on the passenger list. The officer commanding at Dawson was 
wired to, that the boat might be searched on its arrival there. Had Detective Lane 
notified the barracks, or town station, immediately on his arrival, there is not the 
slightest doubt but that the man would have been secured, but he, however, let some 
three hours and-a-half elapse before he asked for any assistance. 

On October 26 a man named Burns reported the loss of $400 in gold dust out of a 
trunk in the stateroom of the Clara Monarch. He suspected one Peter Francis, who had 
been working on that boat as deckhand. Francis left same afternoon, walking to Skag- 
way. The detachments at Caribou and White Pass summit wired to hold and search 
him, which was done at each place, but no gold dust found. Francis was allowed to 
proceed. 

The gold, in this last case, might have been stolen at any time in the two days 
previous to the owner missing it, as he had not looked in his trunk for two days. The 
length of time the thief had at his disposal made it impossible to trace the theft, and 
gave him every opportunity of getting away with it. 

The following is a list of the cases tried during the year : — 

Offences against public order — 

Breach of the peace 1 

Corruption and disobedience — 

Obstructing peace officers 2 

Offences against religion, morals and public convenience — 

Drunks 48 

Creating disturbance 6 

Profanation of the Sabbath 17 

Keeper of house of ill-fame 3 

Inmate " 20 

Gambling 93 

Living on proceeds of prostitution 1 

Vagrancy 11 

Discharging fire-arms 3 

Nuisance 16 

Offences against the rights of propertv — 

Theft : . . 20 

Fraud 1 

Forcible entry 5 

Offences against the person and reputation — 

Murder 1 

Assault, common 6 

Insanity 1 

Ordinances — - 

Breach of liquor ordinance 9 

" fishery " 2 

" game " 1 

" medical " 1 

health " 2 

dog " 7 

Master and servants 5 

Non-payment of wages 60 



24 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Evading customs 1 

Smuggling 5 

Breach of Prohibition Act 1 

Supplying liquor to Indians 5 

Miscellaneous • • • • 6 

Total 360 

Arrests on telegram 15 

Total 375 

Amount of fines collected by police justices of the peace, $1,720. 

DETACHMENTS. 

The detachments have been increased by the addition during the year of Living- 
stone Creek and Glacier Creek, the latter being a Dalton Trail detachment. 

The withdrawing of McClintock and Tagish detachments leaves the total 
number of detachments the same as last year. I withdrew these two latter detach- 
ments, as they were of no further service, a patrol through the district being as service- 
able. The places where these detachments were situated are now quite deserted, and 
with the exception of the scows built at Caribou by the U. C. Y. Company and taken 
to White Horse to be loaded with freight for Dawson, the route is quite abandoned. I, 
however, left the buildings at those places in such a shape that they could be reoccupied 
at any time should it be deemed advisable to re-establish detachments there. 

The detachment at Miles Canyon took over the duties of examining scows and 
boats for liquor. 

destitutes] 

A considerable number of destitute people passed out from Dawson during the 
Mdnter months. In most cases the C. D. Company provided them with board and 
lodging in return for their cutting wood. Tantalus and Five Fingers detachments 
provided several destitute people with food, making them earn the same. 

In January the Lower LaBarge detachment reported that a family of Indians, one 
mile north of the detachment, were in destitute circumstances. They assisted them 
with flour, bacon and tea, vouchers for which were forwarded the Yukon Council. 

The detachments on the trail to Dawson reported a number of destitutes on the 
trail, the great majority working for their board at the different roundhouses. 

In October an inmate of the public hospital here, and in destitute circumstances, 
named Allan Fraser, was sent to his home or people in Cornwall, Ont. I procured a 
pass for him to Skagway and paid his way from there to Cornwall, Ont., forwarding 
accounts, with report of the circumstances to the commissioner, Yukon Territory, Dawson. 

desertions. 
One desertion occurred during the year. 

DISTRIBUTION. 

The strength of this division, especially in the summer months, has fluctuated con- 
siderably owing to the steady drain on it to keep ' B ' division up. The strength of the 
division on October 31 was 117, which included 14 transferred to ' B' division and 2 
discharged, for which no general Yukon orders had appeared authorizing their being 
struck off. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT SNYDER 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

The following table shows the losses and gains during the year :- 





Officers. 


N.C.O's. 


Const's. 


Specials . 


Total. 


Gains — 

Transferred to H 


* 


7 


49 

1 


"'26' 


61 
21 










Total 


5 


7 


50 


20 


82 


Losses— ^ 
Transferred to B ... .... 


2 


4 
1 
1 


48 
2 
9 
4 

1 




54 


Transferred to Dp 




3 






18 


28 


Dismissed 




4 


Deserted 









1 













Total . . 


2 





64 


18 


90 







DOGS. 



Ihere are 132 dogs on charge 



A number of them are getting old 



in this division, 
and will soon be useless for our work. Forty-one were received from the territories this 
fall, twenty-one of which were transferred to B division. 



The following is the distribution : — 

Stikine 5 

Dalton Trail 12 

Caribou 5 

Upper LaBarge 7 

Lower LaBarge 6 

Hootalinqua 5 

Big Salmon 7 

Little Salmon 6 

Tantalus 5 

Five Fingers 8 

Present 25 

Lost 8 

Dead 5 

Attached . . '. 1 

Livingstone Creek '. 6 

Sent to ' B ' Division 21 



Total. 



132 



DRILLS AND TARGET PRACTISE. 



When practicable drills were carried on. In fact in the spring we managed to get 
in about six weeks' drill, comprised of setting up, '^quad, arm, and machine gun drill. 

The above kept the men very busy, as the drills were carried on in addition to the 
other work. 

I regret I was unable to have any target practice, as we had not time to construct a 
range, but hope in the coming season to be able to put the division through the usual 
course. 



26 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
FISH. 

Fish are very plentiful of certain varieties particularly white-fish, which abound in 
large quantities in the lakes in the vicinit}^, and grayling of which large quantities are 
caught with hook and line in the river. 

These fish form a welcome change in the diet. 



FORAGE. 

Our hay this year has all been imported. A quantity of hay last year, and on 
former years, was cut at Tagish, but as the meadow had run out, I decided to allow it to 
lie fallow this year, thereby anticipating a good crop next year. 

The quality of the hay purchased has been good, and the oats are first class. 

FIRE PROTECTION. 

The only protection at present is from extinguishers, babcocks and buckets. A 
hand fire engine has been requisitioned for. 

A steam fire engine has been supplied to the town of White Horse by the Yukon 
Council, but it would not be of any service to the barracks, in the event of fire, the 
distance being too great from the power station at the river. 

The electric light has greatly diminished the danger of fire. 

Brick chimneys have been put in all buildings. 



FUEL AND LIGHT. 

Last year the wood for fuel was cut by our own men, which ^yas a very trjdng tax 
on them, considering the amount of other work to be done in the shape of building. 
This year a contract was let for the wood supply for 1901-1902. 

Since the middle of October the electric light has been installed, and is a great 
benefit. 



GARDEN. 

A small garden was put in at Tagish, but the Detachment being so small, as great 
results as usual were not obtained. A small garden was also put in at White Horse, 
and considering that the soil was not of the best, and required working, the results were 
good. I hope to have a larger and better one next summer. 

The seeds supplied were well selected. 



HARNESS AND TRANSPORT. 

There are 14 sets of cart harness, 5 J sets of heavy wheel, 1 set of light wheel, 1 set 
of single, 6 sets of sleigh, 150 sets of dog, now on charge in this division. 

All this harness has been overhauled and will last another year, including the dog 
harness. 

The transport consists of : — 

Boats, 6 ; boat, canvas, 1 ; sleighs, heavy bob, 1 6 ; sleighs, light bob, 1 6 ; sleigh, 
light bob, 1 ; sleigh, carriole, 1 ; sleighs, single horse, 1 1 ; waggons, lumber, 5 ; canoes, 
26 ; toboggans, 1 1 ; carts, 7 ; scows, 2 ; Labrador dog sled, 1 ; Yukon dog sleds, 30. The 
transport of this division is in very good state of repair and will last another year. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT SNYDER 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Distribution of Transports. 



27 





Q 


1 


2 

6 


Light 
Bob-sleighs. 


Heavy ' 
Bob-sleighs. 1 


1 


i 

1 


r 


of 


White Horse 


3 

1 
1 



1 
3 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 


"2 
2 
1 
1 

1 


1 


1 


3 

'5 
1 







5 

1 

"3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
10 


8 


Wells 

Dalton Trail 

Dalton House 

Stikine . • . . 




"\ 




Caribou 


1 


Lower Laberge , 

Hootalinqua 

Big Salmon 

Little Salmon . . 






1 




.... 






















"i 




... 


1 


Tantalus 








Five Fingers 

Tagish; 

■ 


... 
















4 

















There are also tlir^e launches, one of which is at Caribou and two at White Horse. 
The five lumber wagons on charge, four are at White Horse, and one at Wells. 

HEALTH. 

The health of the division during the year has been all tliat could be desired, and 
reflects very favourably on the stamina and physical fitness of the men. 

I regret to report one case in hospital at present, owing to the lamentable accident 
that occurred to Reg. No. 3513, Const. S. B. Farquharson, which resulted in the loss of 
his right arm. Details of this will be found under ' Accidents and Deaths.' 

Assistant Surgeon Pare has dilated sufficiently in his report on this subject and 
comment bv me is needless. 



HORSES. 

The horses of the division are in good condition and stand the work well. Eleven 
remounts were received from the Territories in the summer, three of which were trans- 
ferred to ' B ' Division. They were a very good stamp of horse. One fairly old team 
of mares that have been worked continually since 1898, the year they came in on the 
Stikine, were turned out for the summer. They were taken up in the fall greatly im- 
proved and were sent to Lower Laberge, and will last another year at slow work. 

The general health of the horses during the year has been good, and the services of a 
veterinary hardly needed by our horses, except in cases of accident such as cuts, punc- 
tures, etc. 

There are twenty-seven horses on the strength, which are distributed as follows : — 

White Horse 13 

Dalton Trail 6 

Lower Labarge 2 

Tantalus 2 

Dead 1 

Transferred to ' B ' Division 3 

Total 27 

(1 mule at Dalton Trail.) 



28 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

INDIANS. 

As far as I can observe the experience of older portions of the provinces and terri- 
tories in regard to the advent of whites in any number amongst the Indian population, 
or in parts inhabited by Indians, holds good to this district. To judge by the number 
of deaths and the amount of sickness, which is mostly of a pulmonaiy nature, the Indians 
in this district are evidently decreasing. 

Great watchfulness was exercised during the year, that the Indians might not pro- 
cure liquor, but notwithstanding our vigilance a considerable number of cases of drunk- 
enness occurred. Five convictions were secured for supplying liquor to Indians. Two 
of the convicted were fined $100 and $50 respectively, another was sentenced to two 
months' hard labour. Of the other two, one was let go on suspended sentence and the 
other cautioned and dismissed. 

In June several cases of measles were treated by Assistant Surgeon Pare, the 
patients being sent across the river and isolated. They soon recovered. 

Assistant Surgeon Pare was despatched to Lower Labarge in June to investigate 
an outbreak of measles that was rumoured to have broken out amongst a small band there, 
but the Indians when he arrived had gone to the mountains on a hunting expedition. 
Assistant Surgeon Pare having some cases here at the same time that necessitated his 
presence, he did not follow them up. By later reports I was informed that the band, 
about twenty in number, were in good health. 

In September, Dr. Nicholson, who is practising in White Horse, repuried that an 
Indian woman named ' Annie,' living on the other side of the river opposite town, was 
suffering from tuberculosis. In the absence of Assistant Surgeon Pare, she was treated 
b}^ Dr. Nicholson and rations were supplied her from barracks. On the return of As- 
sistant Surgeon Pare, she was treated by him and supplied medicine. She died in Octo- 
ber and was buried by her relatives. 

Assistant Surgeon Pare treated ' Tagish Jim ' and supplied him with medicine ; he 
is also suffering from tuberculosis, and is liable to die any day. 

All Indians who applied for it were given medicine and medical advice during the 
year, gratis. 

INSPECTIONS. 

The division was inspected by yourself on 2nd of August. 

Detachments were at intervals inspected by myself and officers, but not as frequently 
as I could have wished. I would ask that at least three inspectors be attached to 
headquarters of this division for duty ; with one officer doing the duties of Acting 
Quartermaster, which entirely prevents him leaving barracks for inspecting duties, the 
time occupied on such duties being very extensive, and the other officer being almost con- 
stantly employed at magisterial and other duties, we are prevented from making as fre- 
quent trips inspecting as should be. 

LAUNCHES. 

There are three in the division, but only one, TheTagish, in use ; this one has been 
of very great service on the lakes above Miles Canyon. 

The others are of too great draught and not sufficient power for river work. I 
would recommend the disposal of the Gladys and Jessie, and a stern-wheel river boat 
■purchased in their place. 

LECTURES. 

Lectures were frequently given on police duties. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT SNYDER 29 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

LIQUOR. 

The liquor traffic during the past season of navigation was kept under excellent 
control, the Amended Liquor Ordinance making it an easier matter to regulate this 
commodity. 

Liquor can be obtained of the wholesale dealers at reasonable prices and good 
quality. 

LUNATICS. 

Peter Galton, a Dane and a naturalized citizen of the United States, was committed 
as a lunatic in July to await the pleasure of the Commissioner, Yukon Territory. As 
it appeared from further medical testimony than that adduced at the time he was com- 
mitted, that he was able to take care of himself and that, as an American citizen, 
he was desirous of returning to his own country, the Commissioner authorized his re- 
lease and requested that he be returned in accordance with his wishes to the United 
States of America. 

Ten lunatics passed through White Horse for the outside during the year. Nine 
of them being from Dawson, under escort of our men, and one from Circle City under 
escort of United States marshal en route for Seattle. 



MAILS. 

The summer mail service has been very unsatisfactory. Up to July, the service 
was fair, the detachments on the river receiving one or two mails a week. During July 
two weeks would elapse when no mail would be delivered to down river detachments. 
It was a practice of mail carriers to carry mail from White Horse, destined to ' H ' 
Division detachments, through to Dawson and deliver it on a return trip, sometimes 
twelve or fourteen days afterwards. Compared with last year the service was very bad. 
Unless mail boats have mail to put off at detachments, they will not call to take mail 
on, even when flagged. 

I would recommend that arrangements be made with the mail contractors to run a 
mail boat once a week on schedule time, that is, leaving White Horse at a stated time 
on a stated day, and stopping at all detachments to deliver and receive mail. The 
same to be done from the Dawson end. 

You will understand that the detachments are the post-offices, through courtesy, for 
prospectors, miners and woodchoppers in their respective vicinities, and the mail re- 
ceived and despatched at some of them, is very considerable. 

It is very annoying for us to mail an important letter and hear fourteen days after- 
wards that it has been just received, having probably in the meantime made the trip 
from White Horse to Dawson and back to White Horse before being delivered at the 
detachment. This uncertainty of mail service is a cause of great increase in our tele- 
graph account, for important matters, or those requiring despatch, the telegraph wire 
must be used. 

At Dalton Trail, we have been carrying our own mail from Haines Mission by bi- 
monthly patrol, which is a very arduous one, principally through American territory, 
the distance being about fifty-five miles. Within the past month, a post-office has been 
established on the American side, at Porcupine City, Alaska, seven miles from Dalton 
Trail Post and which we will take advantage of. There will be a weekly service. 

MINING. 

In the vicinity of White Horse there are a number of copper claims staked which 
as yet have not been developed. A few of them have assessment work done, and one or 
two have shipped ore to outside smelters, two-car loads in all, and obtained good returns. 
Of course the ore was picked. 
28—11 



30 ^OB TH- WEST MO UN TED POL ICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Copper properties are a hard proposition to market, as mining men with capital will 
not touch them, except at a very low figure unless they have been developed. In fact 
it is difficult to get such parties even to go to the extent of developing them unless a 
great amount of work has been done showing considerable promise. There are some of 
the properties bonded, and I understand development is to be pushed during this winter. 
Should development bear out present indications, there certainly is a large and valuable 
copper deposit. 

Coal has been found of an excellent quality within reasonable distance of the town, 
and I believe indications point to great abundance. Before it can be utilized a railwav, 
or tramway, will have to be built to the mines. Should there be any permanency to 
White Horse it will be a great blessing as wood for fuel is becoming very scarce. 

There is considerable prospecting for gold carried on about Caribou, but as yet I 
have not heard of any successful results. 

I understand there is a movement now on foot to erect a smelter at Caribou, as 
owing to its geographical position it is a most suitable site, being at the point where 
transhipment is made from boats from Atlin to railway. It is also within forty miles 
from the copper properties about White Horse. 

With the exception of Livingstone Creek tliere is no gold found in this district. 
The following report from Corporal Acland, who is in charge of the Livingstone Creek 
detachment, shows the mining done in that, or the Hootalinqua district : — 

' The mining operations in this district have improved somewhat in the past year ; 
although the gold output is rather lower than in 1900, the improvement has been 
chiefly in the general development of the district. New creeks have been prospected and 
new claims recorded, but the older creeks have been practically at a standstill. The main 
reason for this is that the work in 1900 proved to the miners that hand labour would 
not pay and that some form of machinery was required to put the claims on a paying- 
basis, and as almost all the miners were men of limited capital, and had sunk the great 
part of it in last season's operations, the claims were allowed in almost ever}^ instance to 
stand over this season, while the owners were either out of the country, working day 
labour for other parties or prospecting for easier creeks to work. 

' There is a very hopeful feeling among the miners, and a general belief that the 
district will be a paying one eventually, and the output of Lower Discovery, Living- 
stone Creek, and the prospects found on almost every creek in the vicinity, give a good 
foundation for this faith. 

' A large number of claims recorded in this district have not had a shovel turned 
in them this season, some having gone by default, others having being bunched for 
assessment work with claims which were being worked. I have not thought it 
necessary to have these unworked claims reported. I have patrolled on police duty the 
various creeks and know what claims have been worked and to what extent, and where 
a man's assessment work was liable to produce gold I have had him report. I have 
tried to avoid unnecessary reporting for the miners, also unnecessary office work, at 
the same time keeping a strict watch over all mining operations. 

' Considerable prospecting has been done between here and Teslin Lake, also in the 
direction of Quiet Lake, and the north fork of Big Salmon River, but no strikes have 
teen reported. 

' On Livingstone Creek, the only claim which has been worked is Lower Discovery, 
which has produced ^7,19.3.56, calculated at fifteen dollars per ounce ; as, however, the 
gold from this district is worth from $17.50 to $19, the actual value is much more. 
This is the only claim in the district which has paid expenses this season or last. A 
bunch of ten claims from L to 10 below Discovery are being got in readiness for working 
next season by the Livingstone Syndicate Company. This company is bringing in 
several tons of machinery this winter and intend to put on a good force of men next 
spring. 

' On Summit Creek, which runs parallel to Livingstone Creek, Lower Discovery, 
only has been worked and has produced $207. 

' Lake Creek, to which there was a stampede this season from White Horse, is a 
new creek and was fairly well prospected this season, but did not produce anything 
more than good prospects, and the work was abandoned early in the season. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT SNYDER 31 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

' Cottonena Creek was not worked this season at all except to do assessment, and 
is, as it stands, an unknown creek as far as bed-rock is concerned. 

' Little Violet Creek is being prospected by two miners this winter, no work being 
done on this creek this summer. 

' Mendecino Creek is being prospected this winter by a party of four men. This 
creek has not been worked this season. 

' Martin Creek was prospected this summer and about $5,000 worth of work done 
on No. 3 below Discovery, but no gold was taken out. 

' Moose Creek was staked this season and fairly well prospected, but did not 
produce more than five ounces of gold for the whole creek. 

' May Creek was staked and some prospecting done on it this season, but only 
produced three ounces of gold. 

' Bear Creek, a tributary of the Boswell River, which runs into the Hootalinqua 
about eighty miles from the mouth, was staked this season and some work done on 
Discovery but only prospects were found. 

' Some bar diggers were at work on the bars of the Hootalinqua this season, but 
the average output was about |2 per man per day. 

' The total value of the gold mined in this district as reported by miners to date is 
$7,947.52. On this royalty has been paid to the extent of $109.68, by Mr. Peters, of 
Lower Discovery, Livingstone Creek. This amount I have allowed Mr. Peters to go 
towards the $250 overcharged him last year, as per instructions from the Gold Commis- 
sioner's Department, leaving him still to his credit the sum of $141.32.' 

The amount of gold exported by the White Pass and Yukon Railway route and 
checked when passing through White Horse was 632,034 ounces. 

QUARANTINE. 

During the early spring an epidemic of small-pox was prevalent along the Pacific 
Coast and eventually reached Skagway. The matter was immediately reported to the 
Commissioner of the Yukon Territory, who approved of an arrangement made with the 
railway transportation people whereby Assistant Surgeon Pare was sent to Skagway and 
inspected all passengers bound for the interior. 

This arrangement was very satisfactory and obviated the necessity of our incurring 
the expense of establishing a quarantine at the White Pass Summit. 

There were four cases all told in Skagway with no deaths, and the fact that there 
was no outbreak at that time in the interior spoke well for the efficacious manner in 
which Assistant Surgeon Pare carries out his orders. 

Beyond the above the only case of infectious or contagious disease was a slight 
outbreak of measles of a mild form. 

RAILWAY AND TRANSPORTATION. 

The British Yukon Navigation Company, known formerly as the Canadian Devel- 
opment Company, added four first class steamers to their splendid fleet of river boats 
this year. These boats are of a larger tonnage, greater speed, and more adapted for the 
passenger traffic than those plying between White Horse and Dawson in previous 
years. 

The White Passand Yukon Railway, notwithstanding the amount t)f freight diverted 
to the St. Michael's route by the cheaper rate, handled a great amount of freight, greatly 
in excess of last year. 

The following approximate figures will give some idea of the amount of freight 
handled by the White Pass and Yukon Railway, which, in conjunction with the British 
Yukon Navigation Company, carries all freight over this route. 

Thirty thousand tons of freight arrived at White Horse, 23,899 tons of which were 
carried to Dawson by steamer, 3,451 tons by scows, the balance being for White Horse 
and locality. Besides this there were 959 tons hauled to Caribou, most of which was 
taken to Atlin by steamer. 
28-111 



32 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Four thousand eight hundred and ninety-one passengers were carried during open 
water by the different steamship companies from White Horse to Dawson. 

Seven thousand two hundred and eighty-seven passengers travelled between Daw- 
son and White Horse by steamer. 

The difference between the number of passengers going into Dawson and coming 
out is made up by the number of passengers that were carried in by the stage lines in 
winter, and those that went down the river in scows, which brings the total movement 
of population above equal both ways. 

The following is a list of the steamers plying between White Horse and Dawson 
with their tonnage, passenger accommodation, and name of owner : 



British Yukon Navigation Company. 

Steamers. Tonnage. 

W^hite Horse ' 631 

Dawson ' 490 

Selkirk ' 490 

Yukoner ' 492 

Sybil' 364 

Anglian ' 115 

Canadian ' 455 

Columbian ' 455 

Victorian ' 455 

Zealandian ' 141 

Tasmanian ' 20 

Bailey' 132 

Bonanza King ' 260 

Mary Graff' 544 

Joseph Closet ' 93 

Klondike Corporation Company. 

Ora' 64 

Flora' 64 

■ Nora ' 64 



Passsenger 
Accommodation. 

150 

50 

50 
125 
125 
100 
150 
150 
150 

75 

100 

125 

150 

50 



100 
100 
100 



Independent Steamers Owned 
hy Different Parties. 

' Clara Monarch ' 350 

' Wilbur Crimmon ' • 156 

' Clifford Sif ton ' 183 

' Prospector ' 165 

'Casca' 364 

' Eldorado' 164 

'Emma Nott' 45 

' Goddard ' (wrecked) 40 

The following ply above Miles Canyon : — 

'Gleaner,' 149 tons, owned by the B.Y.N. Company. 

' Kilbourne,' 54 tons, owned by U.Y.C. Company. 

' Mabel F.' 10 tons, owned by the U.Y.C. Company. 

' Alpha,' 10 tons, owned by the Millhaven Lumber Company. 

' Ogilvie,' — tons, owned by Surtees Hope. 

' Dawson Charley,' 4 tons, owned by Dawson Charley. 

' Tagish,' 2 tons, owned by N.W.M. Police. 



50 
150 

75 
125 
125 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT SNYDER 33 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

The 'Gleaner, owned by the B.Y.N. Company, carried 1,150 passengers and 
1,025 tons of freight during the season, the remaining boats being employed in towing 
logs and scows by the different lumber companies for their saw-mills. 

Ninety-two loaded scows passed or left White Horse, during the summer for points 
down river or Dawson. The number of people going down on scows was 264. 

The contents of all scows were examined at Miles Canyon and White Horse for 
liquor on their way through. 

I am unable to quote the correct figures showing the number of people who passed 
both ways during the winter and spring months, but it is generally estimated that from 
1,000 to 1,200 passed through to Dawson by the regular stage and private conveyance. 

The British Yukon Navigation Company brought in this last fall forty head of 
horses, and with those that survived last winter's work, they expect to run a stage first- 
class in everj^ respect. Judging by the oiiicial records the service last winter was excel- 
lent, but with the improvements made this fall on the different cut-offs it is fully 
expected that they will excel this winter the service of last one. 

RATIONS. 

The present scale of rations is fairly adequate, and the quality, with a few excep- 
tions, is good. The beef during the last year was of a uniformly good quality. The 
men seemed to appreciate the issue of fresh vegetables, as they fill the requirements 
much better than the evaporated vegetables, which are not always a success. 

I would again draw your attention to the quality of the coffee supplied, which is 
one of the cheapest grades in the market. The same can be said of the tea. These 
two articles, in a climate such as we have in this country, are a necessity, and I would 
respectfully point out that a better grade of both should be supplied. 

The last shipment of evaporated apples supplied are without exception the best 
quality ever supplied the force. 

SUPPLIES. 

The supplies furnished during the past year have, as a rule, been of good quality 
and satisfactory with the exception of the evaporated vegetables, which are not desirable, 
as they will not keep for any length of time and at the best are only a very poor substi- 
tute for fresh vegetables. Small shipments of fresh potatoes and onions were received 
during the summer from Vancouver, and the winter supply was received in September. 
Cellars have been dug at all the detachments on the river during the present year, there- 
by enabling them to store their winter supply of fresh potatoes and onions which have 
been forwarded them. 

Since the opening of navigation a weekly supply of fresh beef has been forwarded 
to the detachments. On changing the beef contractors several complaints were received 
from the lower detachments with regard to the quality of the beef supplied by the new 
contractor. On this being brought to the notice of Messrs. Shaw k Co., a refund was 
made for all beef reported as unfit for use and since that time there has been no further 
complaint. 

An agreement was made with Austen & Dickson, of Caribou, for a supply of dried 
whitefish for dog feed for temporary use pending the arrival of supplies from the outside, 
the price per pound for all points north from White Horse to Lower Laberge at seven- 
teen cents. The fish caught in Lakes Marsh and Tagish when dried and smoked are 
certainly a great improvement on the smoked salmon supplied from the outside. 

A quantity of fish-netting was purchased this year and the nets made up at White 
Horse and the river detachments issued with a net each. From a pecuniary point of 
view this has proved a success, one detachment having put up nearly one thousand 
pounds of dried salmon irrespective of the quantity of green salmon fed to the dogs. 
The Dalton Trail detachments with their nets caught sufficient during the summer to 
feed the dogs until late in the fall. 



34 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

The Dalton Trail detachments still continue to purchase locally, and I am pleased 
to report that a reduction has been made in the freight rates charged for the transport 
of the supplies to the outlying detachments from the Dalton Trail. Tenders were asked 
for on freight rates, and owing to a big reduction in the rate per pound the oiFer of the 
Porcupine Trading Company was accepted. Provisions are being freighted to the 
different detachments at the following rates : — Wells, five cents per pound ; Glacier 
Creek, eight cents ; Pleasant Camp, ten cents, and Dalton House, twenty-five cents. 
These freight rates only come into force when it is impossible for us to do our own 
freighting. 

The river detachments have all been rationed up to the end of February, at which 
time the trails will be in good condition, and it will then be an easy matter to forward 
what supplies are necessary. This is, I consider, a great improvement on the old system 
of rationing the detachments for a year, as the stock is less liable to go bad on their 
hands. 

The Stikine detachment, as in previous j'^ears, has been rationed from Vancouver 
direct. 

GENERAL. 

On July 21, a first sitting of the Supreme Court was held at White Horse, Judge 
Dugas presiding. 

On September 1, Mr. G. L. Taylor assumed his duties as police magistrate for the 
White Horse district. 

A fine commodious frame building to combine post office, customs, crown timber, 
mines and court house, has been erected b}^ the Public Works Department, also a fire 
station. These buildings are a credit to the Yukon. 

Stopping places, or roadhouses, have been established at frequent intervals between 
here and Dawson, they are commodious and well run. 

Since taking command of ' H ' Division, I have received the hearty support of all 
officers. Inspector Horrigan has, besides his other duties, been president of the canteen, 
of which he has made a decided success. Inspector McGinnis, whilst attached, and 
Inspector Howard, after his departure, carried out the duties of acting quartermaster. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

A. E. SNYDER, 
Supt. Commanding 'ZT' Division. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNES 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



APPENDIX A. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF INSPECTOR C. STARNES. 

Dawson, Y.T., December 1, 1901. 
The Officer Commanding, 

North-west Mounted Police, 
Yukon Territory. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the attached as my annual report for the year 
ended November 30, 1901. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

CORTLANDT STARNES, 

Inspt. Commaruiing ' B ' Division, N. W. M. Police. 



ARMS, ACCOUTREMENTS, ETC. 

In my annual report for the year 1899-1900, I drew your attention to the arms 
used in this division. They are of the 1876 model, Winchester. The rifling in many of 
them is very badly honeycombed. 

It is very difficult to make the authorities understand how hard it is to keep the 
arms in a fit condition to be used, owing to the atmospheric influences. They are prac- 
tically in use daily by the prisoners escorts, and during the winter, when the weather 
will probably average 40° below zero for four or five months, the arms are continually 
exposed to it and getting thoroughly frosted, and then being taken into a warm guard 
or barrack room, they are sure to be subjected to a very deteriorating effect. 

We have a few Lee-Metford carbines in the division and they are all in good con- 
dition. 

The Enfield revolvers are very cumbersome, more particularly for the detachment 
men, as it is an impossibility for them to carry such heavy side arms when travelling on 
the trails. I would strongly recommend that the department be notified as to the state 
of our arms, and urged to supply us with w^eapons of a more modern model. 

The 7-prs. used in firing the noon-day gun and salutes are in excellent condition. 
Towards the latter end of August we ran out of friction tubes and fuses and we are now 
firing the gun by electricity, and this system has given entire satisfaction. 

The Maxim gun is also in good order and is kept so by the Maxim gun squad. 

ACCIDENTS, DEATHS AND SUICIDES. 

I am sorry to be compelled to report that the casualties under this heading, 
for the past year, have been very heavy. A certain number occurred through careless- 
ness, but the majority were purely accidental. 

December. 

On the 16th, Insp. McDonell held an inquest at Stewart River on the body of one 
Thomas Parker. This man had been out hunting with his partners and was returning 
to their camp for the night, when he accidentally fell into an air-hole in the ice and got 
thoroughly wet. The weather was bitterly cold and before his companions could get 



36 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

him to camp he was badly frozen. He never recovered from the effects and died very 
shortl}' after. The jury brought in a verdict of 'death from exposure during excessive 
cold weather.' His body was buried at Stewart River and a suitable board placed at 
the head of the grave. His effects were handed over to the public administrator and 
receipts taken. 

On the 1 6th, Insp. McDonell held an inquest on the body of one George Aycheson, 
found near Stewart River. Nothing definite could be found relative to the cause of this 
man's death. His bod}^ was very much torn by wolves, and from the fact that a rifle 
was found close to it, containing an empty shell, it was concluded that the man com- 
mitted suicide while in a state of despondency, superinduced by the extreme cold 
weather. 

On the 1st, Insp. Routledge held an inquest, or rather an investigation, into the 
death of one Albert Pilgrim, who was suffocated in a mine on Cheechako Hill, by a 
quantity of earth falling on him. The result of the investigation was that the man 
came to his death through suffocation. 

On the 10th, a man named Harry Moffatt was badly frozen on Eureka Creek. Corp. 
Caudle of the Gold Run detachment reported this case and at once proceeded to investi- 
gate it. He overtook the party hauling Moffatt on a sled and they then found that 
Moffatt had been dead for several minutes. The body was brought to Dawson and an 
investigation held by Insp. McDonell, who found that Moffatt came to his death as a 
result of being badly frozen while hunting, caused by extreme cold weather. 

On the 1 2th, a woman named Clara Haywood died on the trail between Dawson and 
Gold Run. She had been complaining for some time and was en route to Dawson for 
medical treatment, when she took a sudden turn for the worse and was taken into one 
of the roadhouses where she died. An investigation held by Insp. McDonell proved 
that she died from natural causes. 

On the 28th, a man named Roderick McKay was accidentally killed by being caught 
in a cable of the ' Cable Tramway ' on the Ridge Road, at the head of Bonanza. As 
this was purely an accident, an inquest was not held. 

On the 6th, a man named Stephen Holgate, a gambler, committed suicide at Grand 
Forks by taking poison. An inquest was held at Grand Forks b}^ Insp. Scarth and the 
jury returned a verdict of ' death by suicide.' 

On the 22nd, a telegram was received from the officer commanding 'H' Division, 
White Horse, asking for information re Dr. Bettinger, who was reported as missing 
since Deceml3er 7. Dr. Bettinger left Dawson for the outside on foot, dressed very 
poorly, during extreme cold weather. The last seen of him alive was between 
the Nine Mile Roadhouse and Stewart River, when he passed a freighter. Several 
people came to barracks at different times and reported that they had seen Dr. Bettin- 
ger at different places along the river, the furthest point being Lake Laberge. Insp. 
McDonell was detailed to look into this case and make a thorough search, and he with 
the assistance of the men stationed on the river detachments, did all in their power tx) 
obtain some trace of the missing man. They worked night and day, searching every 
known trail, and were exposed to weather which at times registered as low as seventy 
degrees below zero. Insp. McDonell returned to Dawson and reported that to the best 
of his belief. Dr. Bettinger had perished. Nothing more was heard of the missing man 
although the river detachments still kept up a thorough search, until April 11, when I 
received a telegram from Insp. Wroughton, who was up river on a tour of inspection, at 
Stewart River, that Dr. Bettinger's body had been found about seven miles up the 
White River. The doctor had evidently become dazed with the cold weather, brought 
on, no doubt, more rapidly by his being insufficiently clothed, and had wandered away 
off the Yukon trail up the White River. When the body was found, the face was 
very badly mutilated by wolves. The body was thoroughly identified by papers and 
jewellery found on his clothes. The remains were buried at Stewart River and an in- 
quest held by Insp. Wroughton, the jury returning the verdict 'that the body was that 
of Doctor Joseph Bettinger, and that the said Bettinger came to his death from some 
cause or causes unknown to the jury, but are of the opinion that death was caused by 
exposure during extreme cold weather.' 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNES 37 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

January. 

On the 9th, a man named Charles Buffin, who had been working on Gold Run, fell 
down a shaft forty feet deep, but, although he was badly shaken up, he received no 
serious injury. 

On the 11th, William Levy and Frank Swope were killed on No. 22 below Discov- 
ery on Hunker, by a cave-in where they w^ere working in a drift. An inquest was held 
by Insp. Routledge and the jury returned a verdict of accidental death. Their effects 
were handed over to the public administrator. 

On the 19th, a man named Albert Kronquist was killed on No. 46 below on Bon- 
anza. He had been working in a drift when the supports gave way and he was buried 
under about twenty tons of gravel. This accident was thoroughly investigated and it 
was found that an inquest would not be necessary. The body was buried and the 
deceased's effects handed over to the public administrator and receipts taken. 

March. 

On the 8th, a man named Robert Sephton was killed by a cave-in on Quartz Creek. 
This case was fully investigated and an inquest was found to be unnecessary. His effects 
were handed to the public administrator. 

On the 11th, a man named Samuel Nelson was killed on No. 41 below Discovery on 
Bonanza. This claim is owned and worked by J. E. Carbonneau. An inquest was held 
by Insp. McDonell and the jury returned the following verdict : — ' We consider that the 
deceased came to his death by the falling of a quantit}^ of frozen earth from the face of 
the drift, and do not consider any responsibility is attached to the claim owners for the 
falling of this particular piece of earth, but we consider the mine, at present, from what 
we have seen of it, in an unsafe condition, and unfit for men to be working in, and we 
recommend that work be at once stopped until a proper and practical man inspect the mine. 
We consider that the government should appoint thoroughly competent mining inspec- 
tors to examine the mines in this country at least once a month.' This mine was shut 
down and inspected by Mr. H. Powers, mining engineer of the N. A. T. k T. Co., who 
strongly recommended that work be stopped until the mine was put in a safe condition. 
This was accordingly done and after a further inspection by Mr. Powers, work was 
again commenced. 

On the 7th, a man named John Gschwindt died from unnatural causes. An inquest 
was held by Insp. Scarth and it was found that he came to his death as a result of 
' ptomnic ' poisoning, taken with his food unknowingly. 

On the 21st, a man named John Alexander Sword was found in a cabin at Grand 
Forks, dying. The cabin was situated on American Gulch. Dr. Carper, after an ex- 
amination, said that the man was dying from cholera morbus, or something similar. 
After Sword had died an inquest was held and it was found, upon post mortem evidence, 
that he came to his death from the effects of drinking wood alcohol which he took, ignor- 
ant of the poisonous nature of the fluid. 

On the 22nd a man named Archie Mclsaacs reported that he had found his partner, 
Jack McPherson, dead in his cabin in West Dawson. An inquest was held by Insp. 
Wroughton on the 23rd, but adjourned for two days for the purpose of holding a post 
mortem on the body. At tlie conclusion the jury found that he came to his death from 
gunshot wounds inflicted by himself while in a state of despondency. His effects were 
handed to the public administrator. 

April. 

On the 21st, a man named Richard Sullivan died very suddenly in a cabin at the 
rear of the Patterson House, on 2nd Avenue, from unnatural causes. Insp. Routledge 
held an investigation and found that an inquest would not be necessary as the man had 
died from the excessive use of opium and alcoholic liquors. 



38 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

On the 1 9th, the body of Joseph Black was found near Selwyn ; while out on patrol 
Constable Lukey of the Selwyn detachment found a sled and dogs and a camp outfit, 
and could faintly distinguish foot tracks leading from the sled into the brush, but as 
there had been a snow-fall he was unable to trace them very far, but the outfit found 
was recognized as Black's. Search was immediately instituted but with the subsequent 
snowstorms it was impossible to locate anything. Th^ body was not found until after 
the snow had commenced to melt away. The head was severed from the body and was 
badly mutilated by wolves. Insp. Wroughton held an inquest at Selwyn, and the jury 
returned a verdict of accidental death, caused by exposure during extreme cold weather. 

May, 

On the 1st, a man named Aaron Ewing died on No. 34, Hillside Left Limit on 
Hunter Creek, from rabies. He had been hunting and hauling his game to Dawson 
during the winter, and on one of his trips, one of his dogs bit him on the back of his left 
hand. He at once sucked the wound which healed rapidly and thought nothing more 
about the affair until April 2, nearly six week after, when he commenced to feel shoot- 
ing pains in his left arm and shoulder. The case continued to get worse, and the services 
of Dr. Clendenning were called upon. Dr. Cl^ndenning has given a very graphic account 
of the case and made quite an exhaustive report on it. In view of his report, and the 
large number of dogs going mad at that time. Doctors Hurdman and MacArthur held 
an autopsy on the body of Ewing, the result of which was, that both came to the un- 
animous opinion that Ewing had undoubtedly died from rabies. This was the first and 
I am glad to say only case of this disease in the Yukon. 

On the 7th, a fatal accident befel a man named M. D. Canavan, who was chopping 
wood on No. 16 Gold Run, by being caught by a falling tree which broke his spinal 
column. He at once received medical assistance but to no avail. He died on the 11th, 
and upon an investigation being made an inquest was not deemed necessary. 

On the 18th, a man named Philip Morency was accidentally killed on No. 32, below 
Lower Discovery on Dominion Creek, by a bucket falling down the shaft and hitting him 
on the head. The bucket was empty and had become unhooked from the pulley in some 
unknown manner. Inspt. McDonell held an inquest on the body at Dominion, and the 
jury returned the verdict ' deceased came to his death through accident.' His affairs were 
turned over to the public administrator. 

On the 25th, a man named Martin Clair was found dead in a shaft on Skookum 
Hill. He was last seen alive on the day previous. Insp. McDonell held an inquest, 
and the jury found that the deceased came to his death from suffocation from, or by, gas, 
through his own carelessness and recommended that the shaft be properly ventilated 
before being worked again. 

On the 25th, the night watchman of the steamer Nora reported that he saw a man 
fall over the side of the steamer Clifford Sifton into .the Yukon. He did not know any- 
thing about the man except that he was known as ' Paddy ' from Lake Laberge. Every 
possible attempt was made to find the body, but without success. 

On the 31st, a man named John Wright Wroth died in the guard-room. He had 
been arrested by the town station squad, for being drunk and disorderly. An inquest 
was held by Insp. Scarth, and the jury returned a verdict that he came to his death 
through excessive use of drugs and intoxicating liquors. 

June. 

On the 4th, a man named Charles Hinchcliff fell off the steamer Leon into the 
Yukon River and was drowned. The captain of the Leon reported the matter and had 
the river dragged, but without success. Hinchcliff was the cook on the Leon. On the 
29th of July, a body was found in the Yukon in front of the Yukon sawmill. Insp. 
McDonell held an inquest on the body, and the jury returned the following verdict : 
' That the deceased Charles E. Hinchcliff came to his death b}^ being drowned, by falling 
off the steamer Leon into the Yukon River at Dawson, in the Yukon Territory, on June 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNES 39 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

4, 1901, through negligence on the part of the company by which he was employed, by 
having a defective rail on the said steamer Leo7i.' 

On the 9th, a man named Andrew J. Lee was drowned off a raft about five miles 
up the Klondike River. Insp. Wroughton made an investigation of the case and found 
that Lee and his partner, Elof Anderson, were coming down the river on a raft during 
very high water, and in going through the Little Skookum Rapids the raft struck some- 
thing which caused it to make a sudden turn and at the same time a projecting log 
from the shore struck Lee and he fell into the river. He gave one yell as he was fall- 
ing and that was the last seen of him by Anderson. On July 27 his body was found 
in the Yukon River in front of the T. & E. Go's, store. An inquest was held by Inspt. 
McDonell which lasted two days. The j ury returned the following verdict : 'The said 
man, heretofore to the jury unknown, who was found on July 27, 1901, drowned and 
suffocated in a boom of logs in front of the T. & E. store,- is the body of Andrew J. Lee, 
who was drowned and suffocated in the Skookum Rapids in the Klondike River, on or 
about June 9, 1901.' 

On the 1 8th a man named Wesley Bawdy was drowned off a raft about fifteen miles 
this side of Ogilvie. This case was investigated by Inspt. Howard who found it exactly 
similar to that of Lee's. Bawdy's body was never found. 

July. 

On the 2nd, a man named Gustin Spohn was killed on Discovery claim on Bonanza 
by a slide of earth in a cut. This case was carefully investigated and as there were no 
suspicious circumstances in connection with the accident no inquest was held. 

On the 1st, it was reported that the remains of a man unknown were lying on the 
left bank of a creek between West Dawson and the Sixty Mile River. A constable 
and a civilian were at once sent out to investigate. On their return they reported that 
the body was in a very advanced state of decomposition and that very little flesh was 
left on the bones ; that the bones were scattered, and from indications — fur on the 
bushes, torn clothing, (fee, the man had been killed by a bear. There was a bear run at 
that point. The body was buried and the few effects brought to Dawson and handed 
to the public administrator. 

On the 9th a little boy named Elton McLaren was drowned in a slough near the 
fire hall. He had been attending a picnic given by his teacher, Miss McRae, and was 
returning home and had evidently been playing in a canvas boat, as one was found 
turned upside down, and fallen overboard. Inspt. McDonell investigated and found that 
the drowning had been accidental. 

On the 20th, a man named Daniel A. Maynard was killed on No. 22 Gold Run 
Creek by a cave-in in a drift. Inspt. Routledge held an inquest, and the jury returned 
the following verdict : ' Deceased came to his death by the caving in of the side of the 
drift in the mine on No. 22 Gold Run. We are of the opinion that the accident could 
have been avoided if proper precautions had been taken by the claim owners to protect 
the workings and we find that there has been negligence, unintentional in our opinion, 
on their part, and we consider that greater care should be exercised in the future.' 

On the 25th, a man named James McKeown was accidentally killed on claim No. 1 2 
below Discovery on Bonanza by a current from an electric wire. He was at work put- 
ting in a meter when the crowbar which he was using at the time came in contact with 
the wire, killing him instantly. Inspt. Routledge investigated the case and considered 
an inquest unnecessary. 

On the 29th, a man named Benjamin C. McCord was accidentally killed, as it was 
then thought, by falling down a shaft on No. 6, above Lower Discovery on Dominion. 
Medical attendance was at once called but could do no good. Inspt. Routledge left 
at once and investigated the case, and he found that McCord had an option on the 
claim for the purpose of taking a lay, and had been down the mine examining it and 
while there had become partly overcome with gas and had attempted to gain the top of 
the shaft but was overcome and fell back into the mine. His death was caused by 
asphyxiation. 



40 NOBTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
August. 

On the 6th a man named David McHugh was killed on No. 18 Gold Run Creek. 
This claim is owned and worked by Messrs. Chute & Wills. Inspt. Routledge held an 
inquest, and the jury returned the following verdict : ' After consideration of the facts 
of the cause of death, we have agreed upon a verdict of accidental death through the 
falling of a body of frozen sand from the roof of the drift being worked on No. 18, Gold 
Run. We the jurors on this case petition the Yukon council, and urge upon them, the 
necessity of immediately appointing a competent miner to inspect the drifts and see 
that they are in a perfectly safe condition to carry on mining operations.' 

On the 18th a man named Eddie O'Brien reported that a man named William H. 
Wright had attempted to commit suicide by taking poison. The case was at once 
investigated but Wright died in a few minutes. Inspt. Wroughton held an inquest, and 
the jury returned the verdict ' that the deceased died from the effects of arsenic poison- 
ing, taken while despondent through excessive use of alcoholic stimulants, the said 
poison being administered b}^ his own hands.' 

September. 

On the 21st, a man named Jacques Lavois died at Gold Run from the result of 
injuries received in a cave-in on No. 1 7, Gold Run Creek. Insp. Routledge held an 
inquest at Gold Run and the jury found that ' Jacques Lavois was killed by a fall of 
roof on No. 17 Gold Run Creek. We find that the superintendent, J. F. Martin and 
the drift foreman, J. A. Fleming, showed lack of judgment in not taking steps to 
ascertain the thickness of the roof ; had this been done, precautions might have been 
taken and the accident avoided.' 

I think some action should be taken by the Yukon Council in appointing mining 
inspectors from among the mineis, employing only thoroughly experienced and practical 
men. I am sure that had there been some inspectors of this class on the creeks, some 
of these accidents could have been averted. There are not nearly enough mining 
inspectors on the creeks to thoroughly do the work of inspecting the many mines. The 
larger part of the ordinary miners will not look after themselves, and it is therefore 
necessary for some one to look after them and more especially as they, in a great many 
instances, employ much labour. They know what should be done in a mine but seem 
loth to do it until compelled to. 

ASSISTANCE TO OTHER DEPARTMEXTS. 

Under this head I might say that our detachment men are continually performing 
work of different natures. 

Crown Timber and Land Department. 

Members of all detachments along the river accompany and assist the sub-agents 
in the collecting of timber dues and stumpage from the roadhouse keepers and wood- 
choppers ; these sub-agents always stopping at detachments for meals and lodging. For 
the performance of this work our men receive a very small commission. Any incidental 
expenses incurred on one of these trips are, of course, defrayed by the agent. 

Customs. 

The only points in this district where assistance is rendered to the Customs 
Department are at Forty Mile and Dawson. 

At Forty Mile, customs duties are attended to by the N. C. officer in charge of the 
detachment. This is the first Canadian point of entry for traffic up the Yukon River 
from St. Michaels, and also from the Forty Mile and Steele creek districts. The 
boundary crosses the Yukon about thirty miles above the mouth of Forty Mile. 

At Dawson, when a steamer arrives, one of the town station squad at once takes 
charge until the arrival of a customs officer and then gives the necessary assistance, and 
guard, under his instructions. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNES 41 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Banks. 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce and the Bank of British ISTorth America are 
furnished nightly guards from this division ; they are on duty from 7 p.m. until 
' reveille '. 

Telegraph. 

Every possible assistance was rendered to this department during the past year in 
keeping the line open and in good repair, members of the detachments along the river 
accompanying the line-men by canoe, in summer, and with dog teams or snowshoes in 
winter. 

• 
Public Works. 

The men on the creek detachments have been very diligent in preserving law and 
order in the various large camps of men who were employed by this department in 
building the new trails during the past summer, and it is a matter of congratulation to 
know that there were very few cases of lawlessness or drunkenness in these camps. 

We also kept the horses belonging to the Yukon Council during the past winter. 

Department of the Interior. 

Under this head an enormous amount of work is performed by the members of the 
detachments, which keeps the men stationed on the creeks continually on the qui vive. 
At Forty Mile, the N. C. officer in charge of the • detachment searches every outward 
bound steamer, boat, or scow, to examine royalty receipts on gold dust exported. The 
N. C. officers in charge of the creek detachments have, under the supervision of an 
officer, full charge of the collection of royalty. For a full report on this subject I 
would refer you to the subject of ' Collection of Royalty and Mining.' 

Department of Justice. 

Under this heading a large amount of work has been performed by all ranks. 

A court orderly is supplied to the territorial court of the Yukon Territory, whose 
duties are to open, adjourn and close the court, and preserve order, while court is in 
session. 

An orderly is supplied the police court ; his duties are to preserve order, call the 
cases and serve all writs, executions, summonses, etc., within Dawson limits. He also 
makes a daily return to this office and keeps a complete diary showing all his actions. 

The detachment men have done a large amount of work in serving writs, execu- 
tions, subpoenas, attachments, kc, for the sheriff's office and police court, acting as 
bailiffs, Arc. 

The Forty Mile detachment did a considerable amount of work in arresting people 
on capias warrants, and forwarding the prisoners to Dawson. 

Miscellaneous. 

Assistance was rendered on several occasions to the tax collector in compelling 
delinquent tax-payers to pay their taxes. Several seizures were made and constables 
placed in charge but in every case the taxes were paid before a sale was made. 

Every possible assistance was rendered to the mail carriers whenever requested. 

A great deal of assistance was rendered to the preventive officer, Mr. Hugh 
McKinnon, in checking off liquor, as per permit, on its arrival in Dawson. This is fully 
explained under the head of liquor. 

Rations and medicines were distributed to the destitute Indians at Forty Mile, 
Dawson, McQuestin and Selkirk several times, and accounts in triplicate sent to the 
department. 



42 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
bridgp:s and 

During the past year the government has expended a large amount of money in 
making new trails and repairing old ones. New trails were made to Glacier, Hunker, 
Quartz, Eureka, Gold Run, Sulphur, and also new trails connecting the various creeks. 

Good substantial bridges were also erected through the country wherever necessity 
demanded. The ferry has been superseded by a modern steel bridge known as the 
' Ogilvie ' bridge. This bridge was formall}^ opened by Mr. Ogilvie, the then Commis- 
sioner of the Yukon Territory. The police marched to the bridge in a body and took 
part in the opening ceremonies ; speeches were made by the Commissioner and other 
prominent residents. 

The bridge on 1st Avenue has been greatly widened ; the main streets of Dawson 
have been gravelled, and are now in a ^'Bry good condition. 

BUILDINGS, GROUNDS AND REPAIRS. 

During the past year we did not do a great deal of building in barracks, but consi- 
derable on the detachments. 

In December the offices were remodelled and papered. A sidewalk was built 
around the barrack square and to the hospital. 

The old water tank near the hospital was altered and turned into a lunatic asylum. 
This was found to be necessary as the prisoners were disturbed by being compelled to 
listen to the ravings of the lunatics all night, and in consequence they were going sick 
with such regularity that something had to be done at once. The building is two 
stories high and divided into four cells downstairs and an exercise room, and four cells 
upstairs ; there is also an exercise room upstairs ; there is a room downstairs for the 
guard, and a large and commodious yard. Two of the cells are padded. 

The interior of the guard room was altered so as to make more room. This alter- 
ation was made by the authority of the comptroller. 

Owing to want of room in the guard room for a place to store away prisoners' effects 
(such effects had previously been stored over the cells), a room was partitioned off in No. 
3 store room, which is kept under lock and key by the provost. 

The floor in the hospital was taken up and tightened ; this .did not entail any 
expense. 

The room previously occupied by the canteen ef the Yukon garrison was fitted up 
for our canteen, as the rooms we had been using were too small. A cellar was put in 
under it. 

In the matter of officers' quarters, I beg to draw your attention to the necessity of 
the erection of an officers' mess building, as the present little house is totally inadequate 
for the present requirements. Officers coming to the post in the past have been com- 
pelled to either sleep on the floor, or go to an hotel. 

A new upstairs floor was put in the sergeants' mess and the log walls covered with 
asbestos paper. This building is one of the original ones and was very dirt}^ and 
uncomfortable, and these improvements, which did not cost very much, made it fairly 
comfortable. The work was done by prisoners. 

A new detachment building was erected at Ureka, and Sergt. Cornell placed in 
charge. 

A new detachment building was erected at Minto, and Const. Carter placed in 
charge. 

The division mess room was enlarged by cutting out thfe old wash room and bath 
room. This mess room was also papered and painted, and the men now have a mess 
room second to none in the force. 

The rooms previously occupied by the canteen were turned into a wash room and 
bath room. 

The old mud roofs were taken off all the buildings in barracks and shingle roofs put 
on. This has made the general look of the buildings much better than before. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNES 43 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

The location of the detachment at Fort Cudah}^ was moved to Forty Mile and a 
new building erected at that point. It is a two-story building and was put up by the 
members of the detachment. 

A new detachment building was erected at Grand Forks, as the building we had 
been occupying there was costing us too much money in rent. It is a very fine building. 

A new building was also erected at Sulphur, the work on which was done by the 
members of the detachment. 

Stables were erected on the up-river detachments, 16 x 20, by the members of the 
detachments, and this will save the Government a large amount of money during the 
coming winter, as stabling and feed for our horses while freighting had previously been 
very expensive. 

The specials quarters, No. 4 room, has been done away with, and the room is now 
used as a store for the canteen. No. 3 room is now used as a barrack room, and I must 
say that it makes a very cosy room. Old No. 3 room is now used as a specials quarters. 

An addition of 32 x 20 was built to our stables, as we were very short of room. 
This has driven us a very much needed harness and saddle room and also a room for the 
hay and oats. 

General repairs were carried out in all the detachments and in the post as were 
required. 

CRIME. 

Under this heading I think it is a matter of congratulation that there has been so 
little crime in this district during the past year. Taking into consideration the class 
of people who have been attracted here by the gambling and dance halls, and the chances 
of making money off the unsuspecting miner, I must say that crime has been greatly on 
the decrease. Of course in a mining camp like this, where so many men live without 
homes or families, they are bound to look for some kind of amusement, and they can 
find it only in the saloons, dance halls or gambling halls, or with the dance hall women 
or women of doubtful character, and these characters will very naturally congregate 
and make an easy prey of men of weak characters. This has naturally brought in a 
number of confidence men, ' boosters,' gamblers and bums of all kinds, who will attempt 
to live on the weaknesses of others, and when hard up will resort to almost any means 
of obtaining the necessary food upon which to live, or its equivalent in money ; how- 
ever, I consider that by hard work on our part, such a close check was kept on them all 
that there was comparatively little crime. 

The gambling has been done away with, and quite a number of those who were 
living on the avails of it have, of course, left the country for fresh fields. The closing 
up of the gambling will temporarily have a deteriorating effect on certain classes of 
business, but I am quite confident that the concerns affected will very shortly get on to 
a sounder basis, and will soon recover completely from the temporary drawback. 

The famous Clayson-Relfe-Olsen murder case came to a close by the conviction and 
execution of George O'Brien. This was one of those cases which could not have been 
foreseen — the extent of countr}^ that we have to cover, makes it impossible to effectually 
patrol it, even if we had double the men, aud with all our heart thrown into our work 
it would be impossible to prevent such happenings when they are so cleverly planned. 
In this one case the men who are supposed to have been accomplices of O'Brien have 
not been caught or located, but every effort is still being made to locate them, and no 
doubt, unless they have also been killed, they will soon be brought to justice. This case 
has cost the Government a great deal of money, and I am sure it has had a very salu- 
tary effect on the bad element, as it has shown them that nothing will be left undone, 
and no expense will be spared, to prevent crime and bring the guilty ones to justice ; 
that prosecution is certain to follow and severe punishment be given if convicted. 

In the case of George St. Cyr, who killed a man named James Davis in Nov- 
ember last at Hootalinqua. The murderer had previously borne a good reputation 
and belonged to a very respectable family. His bad temper must have got the best of 
him. He was first sentenced to death, but afterwards his sentence was commuted to 



44 NORTH- WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

imprisonment for life. The place where the murder occurred is an isolated one, and of 
course nothing could be done to prevent it. 

In the case of James Slorah, this man was sentenced to be hanged in the month of 
March last, but the sentence was commuted to imprisonment for life. The jury, in this 
case, in bringing in their verdict of guilty, added a strong recommendation for mercy. 
This man killed a woman named Pearl Mitchell, who was supposed to be his wife, at any 
rate he was living with her as his wife. The facts of the case were reported in my last 
report. 

On November 14, a saloon, known as the Dominion Saloon, was robbed of some 
$1,500. Quite a number of men were in the place at the time, but the robbers came in 
very suddenly, covered every one with their guns and ordered them to hold up 
their hands, and then demanded the keys of the safe and desk. This robbery had been 
well planned by evidently professional criminals. One of the suspected parties is now 
confined in the guard-room, and is committed for trial before the higher court, his name 
is Mart Tomerlin, another suspected one, named William Brophy, has been arrested, 
and I have no doubt but that we are on the proper clue, and feel confident that convic- 
tions will be secured. 

There have been a number of sluice box robberies on some of the creeks and we 
have been fortunate in securing one or two convictions, but in many instances it was 
impossible to find the thieves. This class of crime is one of the hardest to detect owing 
to a great number of the miners leaving their sluice boxes unprotected when there is a 
lot of gold in them, and another reason being that it is impossible to identify gold dust. 
We may have our suspicions in many cases, and in some feel sure of our man to a moral 
certainty, but it is almost impossible to prove the guilt unless we catch the man in the 
act. The distances being so great, it is out of the question for us to place guards on 
every claim, and the miners who wish to keep their gold must take proper precautions. 
It would be just as well for a farmer in the east to leave ten dollar bank notes in his 
stable yard with no one to watch them, as to leave the gold in the sluice boxes the way 
some of the miners do. 

/There has been a remarkable decrease in drunkenness and disorderly conduct during 
the past year, and I must say that taking the population all through, it is a very 
orderly one. 

I attach hereto a list of the cases tried in the police court during the time police 
officers occupied the bench during the past year. 

Mr. C. D. Macauley took over the duties of police magistrate in September, thus 
relieving the officers of the police force of a very large amount of work. The only 
magisterial work done by our officers now in the Yukon is on the creeks. 

The following are some of the minor cases we have had during the past year. 

On December 13 1900, a most daring robbery was reported to have occurred at a 
grocery store. A man was said to have walked deliberately into the store and at the 
point of a pistol made the parties present hand over the amount of money they had 
in the till — about $100. This case was thoroughly investigated but from the first there 
was no clue to work on, and I am of the opinion that it was merely an advertisement 
fake, as a great deal was made out of the afiair. 

On January 9, 1901, a man named G. Gustafson was charged with fraud and per- 
jury in reporting the amount of the output of a claim on Cheechako Hill, with the 
purpose in view of defrauding the Government out of royalty. The evidence against 
him was such that he was sent up for trial to the higher court where he was convicted 
and sentenced to six months' imprisonment with hard labour. 

On February 7 a man named George Clark was sentenced to six months' imprison- 
. ment with hard labour for perjury. This prosecution arose out of a mining case which 
was being tried in the Gold Commissioner's court, in which Clark was interested. 

On the 19th a man named Louis Blum was sentenced to one month's imprisonment 
with hard labour for the theft of a quantity of fire wood. 

On the 27th a man named Henry Williams was sentenced to four months' impris- 
onment with hard labour for the theft of a quantity of coal oil from the A. E. Co. 

On the 27th a man named Thomas Hanlon was sentenced to one month's imprison- 
ment with hard labour for the theft of a quantity of hams. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNES 45 

SESSIONAL PAPER No* 28 

On the 27th a man named James Walsh was sentenced to two months' imprison- 
ment with hard labour for the theft of some parcels of dry goods from the store of 
R. P. McLennan. 

On March 3 the police at Grand Forks raided a house run by a woman named 
Mollie Smith on suspicion of its being a disorderly house and opium joint ; they seized a 
quantity of opium, pipes, &c., and arrested one F. Smith, who lived with the woman. 
He was given two days to leave the town. The woman was fined ^25 and costs for 
keeping a disorderly house. 

On the 5th a man named Fred. Erickson reported that he had been robbed of .f 160 
in nuggets by a woman named Edith Green, a prostitute living on 4th Avenue. The 
woman was arrested on a charge of assault and sentenced to ten days' imprisonment 
with hard labour. She was committed for trial on the charge of theft, but the case 
was cUsmissed in the higher court for lack of evidence. 

On the 11th a woman named Mollie Thompson, the proprietoress of the Globe Hotel 
at Grand Forks was, by the Hon. Mr. Justice Dugas, sentenced to five years' imprison- 
ment at hard labour for the theft of some $400 from a man named Fred. Nicholls. It 
seems that Nicholls went into the hotel and claimed acquaintance with the woman, 
saying that he had known her in Montana. They had several drinks together and he 
got very drunk and received some very rough handling, and the following morning he 
reported to the police that he had been drugged and robbed. This sentence has had a 
very salutary effect on the dance hall women in this country, as heretofore they were 
not overcaref ul as to how they obtained money from men, and we have had several cases 
in court, but have been practically unable to secure a conviction as the people of this 
class hang together too well. * 

On April 1 a man named John Langevin was sentenced to four months' imprison- 
ment with hard labour for the theft of a quantity of gold dust from a roadhouse on 
Gold Run. 

On the 1st a man named Gilbert Sherwood was sentenced to one month's imprison- 
ment with hard labour for the theft of gold dust from a roadhouse on Gold Run. 

On the 2nd a man named P. S. Sheehan was sentenced by Mr. Justice Craig to four 
months' imprisonment with hard labour for obtaining money under false pretenses. The 
crime was committed at Forty Mile. 

On the 2nd a woman named Mrs. M. Scott, the proprietoress of the Stockholm 
Baths, reported that a man named Jacob Rosenfield had obtained the sum of $50 from 
her under false pretenses. The man was arrested and tried by the higher court and 
was sentenced to one year's imprisonment with hard labour. 

On the 2nd the sluice boxes on No. 16 Eldorado were robbed ; no report had been 
made to the police about the matter, but Staff-Sergeant Raven, who was in charge of 
the Grand Forks detachment at that time, heard the report indirectly and sent a con- 
stable up to investigate. The mine was divided up into lays, one of which was worked 
by a man named Mitchell, and it was on his lay that the robbery took place. About 
•$300 was taken. There was no clue to the, robbery. When asked why he had not 
reported the matter, Mitchell said that it was some time before he noticed that the boxes 
had been robbed, and that new dirt had been put back in them along with what had 
previously been there. 

On the 9th a quarrel took place on No. 21, below on Hunker Creek, in which a 
man named John Theiss stabbed a man named Frank Bibbo very seriously. Theiss was 
arrested and sentenced to six months' imprisonment with hard labour. During his im- 
prisonment he became insane and was transferred to the asylum at New West- 
minster, but while en route there in the custody of Corporal Stewart he escaped from 
his guards while the boat was taking on wood at Selkirk. Every effort was made to 
find the man but without success. 

On the 1 6th a man named A. D. Greenan was committed for trial for stealing gold 
from the sluice boxes on No. 6, above on Bonanza. The man was caught in the act and 
received two years' hard labour. TsbM"'"'° 

On the 17th a man named Tony Bogetta, part proprietor of the Donovan Hotel, 
was sentenced to one month's imprisonment with hard labour for stabbing a man named 
28—12 



46 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 Edward vii., a. 1902 

Larry Bryant, an actor, in the arm. It seems that a man who is known around town 
as the ' French Count ' had invited Bryant and a variety actress named Blanche Cam- 
metta to dine with him in his rooms over the McCormack restaurant, and while dining, 
Bogetta, who was very much infatuated with the woman, and had been in the habit of 
bu3dng her wine, tfec, attempted to gain admittance, but as his company was naturally 
objectionable to the male members of the little dinner, force was resorted to, to get him 
away, and in the scuffle he used a jack-knife on Brj^ant, who, as it afterwards turned out, 
was the successful lover. Bogetta had formerly borne the best of reputations. 

On the 24th, the safe in the mining inspector's office at Grand Forks was opened 
and robbed of $1,650. It was impossible to fix upon the guilt}^ party. 

The celebrated murder trial of Rex vs. O'Brien commenced at the Territorial Court 
on June 10. This case was stubbornly fought from all points by the defence. Some 
eighty witnesses were present, some of whom had travelled thousands of miles. 
The prosecution closed its case on the 20th, and on the morning of the 21sfc 
the jury rendered a verdict of 'guilty,' and on the same morning O'Brien was sentenced 
to be hanged on August 23. This case attracted world-wide attention on account of 
the cold-blooded manner in which the murders were committed. There were no eye- 
witnesses, and the fact has been conceded b}^ all who followed the case from the com- 
mencement, that the web of circumstantial evidence woven around O'Brien was 
most complete. On August 23, O'Brien was hanged in the presence of representative 
citizens, and as he walked to the gallows he continually cursed the police who had been 
instrumental in bringing him to justice. Great credit is due Inspector Scarth, Corporal 
Ryan and Constable Pennycuick for the painstaking manner in which they carried on 
the work, obtaining evidence which undoubtedly caused this awful criminal to be hanged. 

On July 4 a dance hall woman reported that she had been robbed of $180 and a 
gold watch and chain from her room in the Melbourne Hotel, and that she suspected two 
other dance hall women named Fay Devine and Ray Forrest of the theft. These two 
women left in a small boat en route for Nome, but I telegraphed to the N. C. officer in 
charge at Forty Mile, and they were arrested and brought to Dawson where they were 
committed for trial. When the case was called in the Territorial Court they were both 
dismissed on account of lack of direct evidence. 

On the 9th we raided the O'Brien Club, as complaint had been made to the effect 
that gambling was going on there. We were refused admittance so that it was neces- 
sary to break in the door. Seven men were present and they were each warned to 
appear at the police court the following morning. The gambling outfit was seized and 
destroyed, and some six hundred dollars on the tables also seized and turned over to the 
Crown. The proprietor was fined $150 and costs. 

A test case of a sailor deserting his ship in Canadian territor}^, after signing papers 
to sail in an American bottom, w^as tried on the 26 th when a man named George 
Stevens was charged with deserting the steamer Susie. He had signed papers at St. 
Michaels for the round trip to Dawson and after his arrival there he refused to 
return with the ship. He was convicted and sentenced to eight weeks' imprisonment 
with hard labour. Shortly before the steamer left Dawson, the United States Consul, 
Col. McCook, sent in a requisition for the prisoner to be turned over to the captain of 
the steamer, this was done and a receipt taken from the captain but as soon as the 
steamer had cleared the docks the man jumped ashore. He was re-arrested and brought 
to the guard room and was subsequently turned over to the United States Consul. 

One conviction was obtained in July against a man named Henry Phillips for sell- 
ing liquor to Indians and he was sentenced to one month's imprisonment with hard labour. 

On August 11, a man named S. Schroeder, the proprietor of the Oak Hall clothing 

• store, reported that some one had entered his store by the rear and stolen two pokes, 

containing in all about $500 in gold dust. This case was fully investigated and from 

the first we were of the opinion that it was a trumped up story, but have been unable 

to find out anything as to why it should be so reported. 

On October 12, a variety actress named Annie Merrill, reported that she had had 
$700 stolen from her trunk in the Empire Hotel. She suspected a man named Pete 
Smith, and very unfortunately accused him of the theft before she reported the matter 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNE8 47 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

to the police. No evidence could be found against Smith. This woman had been 
* living ' with Smith who had a key to her room and was in the habit of going in and 
■out of the room as he pleased. The morning of the supposed robber}^ she went 
to her room very drunk. I was under the impression that Smith had taken the money 
but the fact that the woman accused him of the theft before reporting the matter put 
him on his guard. Smith does not bear a very good character and is a frequenter of 
the saloons. After we had gone to a lot of trouble over the matter, the woman admit- 
ted that she wanted to ' break ' with Smith, and nad used this means to do so and that 
she had never lost any money at all. We have had so many complaints of this character 
from this class of people, that from our experience in the past, I have found it much 
safer to go very slow in investigating any of their charges, as they do not seem to have 
the least idea of truth, and when they once ' get down ' on a person, they will tell 
almost anything to get him into trouble. 

On the 16th, a woman named Mrs. Stevens reported that she had been robbed of 
$105, a gold ring and purse. She said that three men had given her liquor and taken 
her to their cabin but she did not know their names, but knew them by sight. This 
case was fully investigated and the men, with whom she had been drinking, stated that 
she herself had bought several drinks and had her money tucked away in her stocking, 
and as she was very drunk, it was thought that she lost her money in that manner. 

On the 27 th, M. Noel, the female impersonator at the New Savoy Theatre, reported 
that some of his stage costumes had been stolen. Suspicion rested on a man named the 
' Rag-time-Kid ' and he was arrested, convicted and sentenced to one month's imprison- 
ment with hard labour. 

Several hold-ups have been reported to us during the past year, but when they are 
followed up, we have almost invariably found that they were nothing but imaginative. 

There were many cases of supposed theft of articles from cabins reported, some of 
which were true and the cases fully investigated, but in many, it was found that there 
were no grounds for complaint at all. 

I attach hereto a statement of the cases tried in the police court while the oflficers 
were acting as police magistrates. 

Owning building of combustible material 1 

Peddling on Sunday 1 

Peddling without a license 3 

Allowing gambling on licensed premises on Sunday 2 

Violation of dog ordinance . 35 

Drunks 215 

Wage cases 223 

Nuisance 6 

Escaping from custody 1 

Violation Yukon health ordinance 44 

Theft 65 

Profanation of Lord's day 10 

Attempted suicides 1 

Perjury 2 

Obtaining money under false pretenses 14 

Insanity 18 

Pointing firearms 3 

Cruelty to animals 9 

Selling meat and food unfit for human consumption 6 

Murder 1 

Threatening 5 

Creating disturbance 10 

Indecent exposure 2 

Indecent assault 2 

Assault 66 

Vagrancy 15 

Obstructing a peace officer •. 7 

-28— 12 J 



48 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Having a hotel license — has no accommodations 1 

Keeper of house of ill-fame 3 

Inmate of house of ill-fame 11 

Gambling on Sundays 5 

Gambling 9 

Disorderly conduct 2 

Violation liquor ordinance 14 

Allowing drunkenness on licensed premises 4 

Selling liquor without a license 4 

interdiction 7 

Procuring liquor while interdicted 5 

Selling liquor to a drunken man 4 

Selling liquor to Indians 2 

Refusing to tell where he got his liquor 1 

Drunk while interdicted 5 

Allowing man in bar during prohibited hours 2 

Allowing female under 18 to sell liquor 1 

Refusing to be vaccinated 4 

Bound over to keep the peace 2 

Playing cards on Sunday in public place 26 

Having no sign over bar door 21 

Possession of stolen goods 1 

Furious driving 1 

Fighting 23 

Criminal libel 5 

Witchcraft ^ 1 

Neglect to provide for wife and child 2 

Billiard and pool table without a license 1 

Bow ling alley without a license . .• 1 

Slaughtering cattle in town limits 1 

Selling meat from unlicensed slaughter-house 1 

Slaughter-house without license 1 

Fraud 5 

Cohabitation and living in conjugal union 1 

Rape 1 

Running a ferry boat without a license 1 

Running ferry boat while intoxicated 1 

Forest fires . 1 

Breach of contract 1 

Forcible entry 1 

Desertion 1 

Using abusive language 19 

Miscellaneous cases under no particular heading 136 

Total number of cases tried 1,104 

The amount of fines collected, and accounted for, during the time the bench was 
occupied by police officers, was $7,534.90. 

CENSUS. 

A census of the Yukon Territory was taken during the year by Major H. Woodside, 

who was Census Commissioner. The police assisted him in every possible way, acting 

as enumerators, furnishing transport, tfec. As the Commissioner has kept the result of 
the census a secret, I am unable to state the present population of the Yukon, but am 
of the opinion that it will be in excess of the previous census. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNES 49 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

To take the census of a country like this entails an enormous amount of work, for 
in a good many instances the enumerators were compelled to travel many miles over 
very rough country to get one or two names. 

CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE. 

I am pleased to state that the conduct of the Non-Commissioned Officers and Con- 
stables of "B" Division, has been, taking it on an average excellent. 

Dawson presents to a young man many snares into which the unwary, if he does 
not exercise an extra amount of precaution, is sure to fall. 

It is a noticeable fact that, after being transferred to Dawson, if a man can with- 
stand the temptations for three or four months, he has then no trouble in the future; of 
course in regard to this, the old axiom 'there are exceptions' applies. 

CANTEEN. 

We found that the accommodation for the canteen was altogether too inadequate, so 
the rooms previously used as a canteen by the Yukon Garrison were altered and we are 
now very comfortably situated in so far as the canteen is concerned. 

Towards the later part of last winter our stock was entirely used up and this fact 
proved to be a great hardship on not only the men, but the various messes, for in a 
great many instances the prices in vogue in Dawson, as compared with those for the 
same articles in the canteen, were almost double; however, large orders were sent out to 
Vancouver, Victoria and Quebec on the opening of navigation and by the end of the 
season we had imported sufficient stock to last us during the coming winter. 

To those who are not familiar with the conditions existing here, I would say that it 
must be remembered that for about eight months in the year we are unable to obtain 
any stock from the 'outside', and are thus compelled to purchase in large quantities 
during the four months^of navigation, and for this reason only is a large stock carried. 

The canteen is in a very prosperous condition and is thoroughly appreciated by all 
ranks. It has a great tendency to keep many of the men at home, and others from fre- 
quenting the many saloons, and other so-called places of amusement. 

I would earnestly draw your attention to the fact that the 'canteen and recreation 
room' exists here in name only. We have a well supplied and efficient canteen, but we 
have no recreation room, and as such a room for the men is an absolute need, in which 
they may read and write with some degree of comfort, I would recommend that a build- 
ing be erected for this purpose. The room now used is in the canteen, and with the 
billiard table, card tables and piano, it is impossible to play billiards, cards and the piano 
at the same time. If we had a regular building for this purpose, we could then place 
the library in it, but as it is the library is now situated in one of the barrack rooms. 

The men have gone to a large expense during the past year in purchasing library 
books from Vancouver, a certain amount being deducted from their pay monthh^, and 
these added to the books received from Ottawa, make a very respectable and fairly pro- 
portioned library. 

COLLECTION OF ROYALTY AND MINING. 

The Yukon territory has sustained its former reputation in regard to the amount 
of gold mined during the past year ; although I regret to say that Hunker, Dominion, 
Sulphur and Gold Run Creeks have not produced as much as last year, on the other 
hand new creeks have turned out good producers, namely, Eureka and Clear Creek dis- 
tricts. Royalty has been paid on. several claims on Eureka, but none on Clear Creek. 
The royalty paid this year from the Forty Mile district was nearly double that of last 
season. Bonanza and Eldorado, with their tributaries, are still to the front, there being 
as much gold taken out of these two creeks as from all the other creeks in the country 
combined. 



50 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

The Indian River district proved a great attraction for prospectors during the past 
year, and the discoveries made were the cause of a great number of sta,mpedes, and if the 
claims prove as good as reported, they will open up a large new mining district. 

The new Government road built to the mouth of Quartz will be of great benefit to 
the miners in that vicinity and will materially assist in opening up the district. 

There have been many more Hillsides and Benches worked during the year than 
in the past and on the Right Limit of Bonanza in particular, new finds are being made. 
A number of good claims are now being worked to advantage on ground which has been 
passed over many times as being ' no good '. 

Quartz ledges on the Divide, between Victoria Gulch and Eldorado, have attracted 
the attention of all who are interested in mining. Owing to the immense possibilities 
w^hich may reasonably be expected from quartz in the Yukon, some of the most promis- 
ing ledges are beginning to draw the attention of prospectors and miners, and a large 
number of ledges are located now at the head of the Gulch between Victoria and Eldo- 
rado and are being most thoroughly prospected. On one of the claims there is already 
a shaft down some 50 feet. The quality of the ore being taken out is said to be fully 
up to expectations. 

The ore is being sledded to Mundergs Stamp Mill on the Klondike, where a 
thorough test will be made, the results of which will be looked forward to w4th much 
interest by every one residing in the territory. 

During the early part of the season, the 10 per cent ro3^alty on the production of 
gold, was reduced to 5 per cent. It must be understood that the amount of gold ex- 
ported, does not mean the total amount of gold mined during the year, for every claim 
has an exemption of $5,000, and there are a large number of claims which have been 
worked during the past year which would perhaps average $4,500, and others which 
would not average $1,000. 

The Non-Commissioned Officers in charge of the Creek detachments have full 
charge of the collection of royalty. They collect it direct from the miners, taking 
their affidavits and returning to them their royalty receipts. They then forward 
the royalty with the receipt stubbs, and royalty statement to m^ and I forward it to the 
Comptroller of the Yukon Territory, receiving in return from him a receipt in full. 
The collection of royalty has caused an almost endless amount of work on the creeks, 
as those in charge of the work have to be very diligent in looking after the claim own- 
ers who have not reported, and who would not report their output if they were not 
compelled to do so. The miners are compelled to report their output at least once a 
month. 

The following is the different amounts of royalty collected at the various Creek de- 
tachments in the Yukon territory. 



DAWSON. 

Inspt. Wroughton is in charge of the collection of royalty for the Dawson district^ 
which comprises from 60 below on Bonanza to its mouth. Bear Creek, &c. The amount 
of royalty collected by Inspt. Wroughton was $8,078.88. 

Forty Mile. 

Corporal Goodall in charge of this detachment. The amount of royalty collected 
was $599. 

Eureka. 

This detachment was opened up in April with Staff Sergeant Corneil in charge. 
The amount of royalty collected was $391.15, which amount, considering that it is a 
new creek, is very good. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNES 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Dominio7i. 



51 



Corporal Hildyard was in charge of this detachment. The amount of royalty- 
collected was $37,751.41. 

Sulphur. 

Corporal Caudle was in charge of this detachment. The amount of royalty col- 
lected was $11,518,91. 

Gold Run. 

Corporal JealouvS is in charge of this detachment. The amount of royalty col- 
lected was 837,084.87. 

Hunker. 

Corporal Ryan is in charge of this detachment. The amount of royalty collected 
was $36,526.86. 

Grand Forks. 

Staff Sergeant Raven and Sergeant Holmes have been in charge of this detach- 
ment, the latter being in charge at present, an inspector has been stationed there per- 
manently also. The amount of royalty collected was $249,211.81. 

The total amount of royalty collected during the year was $381,162.89. 

GOLD EXPORTED. 

• The following is a list of the gold exported during the open season of navigation : — 



District, &c. 



Connnercial . 

Banks 

Bonanza 

Dominion 

Hunker 

Sulphur 

Gold Run . . . 
Forty Mile . 
Hootalinqua. 
Z. T. Dust. . 



June. 


July. 


August. 


September. 


October. 


Oz. 

66, 809 -02 

267,933-11 

28,310 50 

2,671 75 

3,420 95 

859 75 

517 00 


Oz. 

36,421-85 

213,538-63 

11,638 13 

4,042 00 

1,729-80 

661-50 

112 00 


Oz. 

22,139 60 

113,011-67 

23,425- 17 

1,972 25 

1,297-95 

565 -00 

802 00 


Oz. 

26,889 

94,670 

42,543 

4,260 

4,764 

1,378 

3,306 

5,302 

65 


92 
59 
68 
50 
00 
26 
00 
65 
00 


Oz. 

23,473-26 
60,047 12 
9, .355 -45 
1,115-25 
958-50 
1,477-75 
3,102 25 






54-75" 




17 00 




1,327 


30 


890 05 


370,539 -08 


268,143-91 


163,268-39 


184,507 


90 


100,419 63 



Grand total, 1,086,878-91 ounces at $15 per ounce = $16,303,183.65. 
Approximate output of gold for this part of the territory was $25,000,000. 



DOGS. 



The dog question in this country is one which requires a great deal of attention. 
The present strength of the dogs in 'B' Division is 105, of which 21 have lately been 
transferred from the outside. These last arrived here in very poor condition, and are 
not at all the class of dog suitable for the work to be done in this country. 



52 NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1S02 

The only thoroughly serviceable dogs are those bred here which are known as ' Mala- 
mute ' and ' Husky.' These dogs can be relied upon in cases of emergency. 

One or two of our bitches gave birth to a litter of pups, and these will be taken on 
the strength as soon as they are broken to harness. 

I am not very sanguine as to the possibility of our old detachment dogs performing 
a full winter's work, for it must be remembered that they have been working hard for 
the past three or four winters. 

Several of our dogs were killed by wolves ; several by ourselves on account of rabies 
and mange, and several on account of old age. One dog in particular was killed on 
account of old age, and is a good illustration of the usefulness of the breed known as the 
husky. This dog was in the service of the Hudson's Bay Co. for about 14 years and in 
our service for three years, making him at least 18 years old. 

I am glad to say that very few of our dogs were attacked with rabies, although this 
disease was prevalent all over the territory and hundreds of valuable dogs were killed. 

DRILLS AND TRAINING. 

As soon as spring opened and the ground had sufficiently dried up, all ranks of the 
division paraded daily at 6.15 a.m., and were put through a two months course of 
physical, arm and division drill, and a very marked improvement soon became notice- 
able. 

The recruits, as soon as they arrived from the territories, were put through a 
course of arm and squad drill. 

For three months all non-commissioned officers in the Post were put through a 
thorough course of ' communicating ' drill, and I am pleased to say that they all took a 
great interest in this and soon arrived at such a state of proficiency as to be able to 
drill the recruits. 

The Maxim gun squad jDut in about six weeks daily drill, and are now in a very fair 
state of proficiency. 

DETACHMENTS. 

The detachment buildings are all in a good state of repair and are very comfortable. 
New buildings were erected at Forty Mile, Grand Forks, Sulphur, Minto and Eureka, 
while stables have been erected at all the up-river detachments. 

A new detachment was erected early last spring at Eureka, where a new strike had 
been made, and Staff sergeant Corneil placed in charge. This detachment was found to be 
necessary on account of the distance of Eureka from other detachments. 

A new detachment was erected and placed at Minto, between Hootchiku and Sel- 
kirk, as the distance between these two detachments was found to be too great (53 
miles) for the Selkirk patrol to make in one day ; Constable Carter is in charge. Minto 
was near the scene of the atrocious O'Brien murders. 

I cannot adequately express my appreciation of the amount of work performed by 
the detachment men during the past year, as they have beeen employed in almost every 
capacity and have assisted in doing work on the trails, in looking for lost people, when 
the mercury has registered as low as 70° below zero, and none but those who have 
experienced such intense weather can realize what that means. 

The following is a list of the detachments of ' B ' Division with the strength of 
same : — 

Hootchiku. — 2 constables, 1 dog team and 1 canoe. 

Minto. — 2 constables, 1 special, 1 canoe. 

S Ikirk. — 1 sergeant, 1 constable, 1 special, 1 dog team, 1 canoe. 

Selwyn. — 2 constables, 2 dog teams, 1 canoe. 

Half Way. — 2 constables, 1 dog team, 1 cancie. 

Stewart River. — 1 sergeant, 1 constable, 1 special, 1 dog team, 1 canoe. 

Ogihie. — 3 constables, 1 dog team, 1 canoe. 

India7i River. — 2 constables, 1 dog team, 1 canoe. « 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNES 53 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Forty Mile. — 1 corporal, 4 constables, 1 dog team, 2 canoes. 

Dog Island. — 2 constables, 1 canoe. 

Grand Forks. — 1 inspector, 1 sergeant, 5 constables, 2 horses. 

Sulphur. — 1 corporal, 2 constables, 1 horse. 

Hunker. — 1 corporal, 2 constables, 1 horse. 

Dominion. — 1 corporal, 2 constables, 1 horse. 

Gold Run. — 1 corporal, 1 constable, 1 horse. 

Eureka. — 1 staff-sergeant, 2 constables, 1 horse. 

McQuestin. — 1 sergeant, 1 constable, 1 special, 1 dog team. 

FOREST FIRES. 

I have nothing under this heading of a serious nature to report. A rather severe 
fire raged for about 15 days near Selkirk but soon subsided. A fire of about 5 days' 
duration raged at McQuestin, and one for about 3 days below Dawson. The cause of 
these fires are unknown. 

At Ogilvie a small fire was started by some careless wood choppers but very little 
damage was done 

FIRE, GENERAL. 

Dawson was visited with several severe fires during the past year which resulted in 
an approximate loss of f 80, 000, the great majority of these fires being caused by 
defective flues, overheated stoves, stovepipes. 

During the winter months the Dawson Fire Department receive an average of 
four calls daily, but of course a large number of these calls are false alarms. 

The following is a list of the more serious fires : — 

S. Y. T. Co., Warehouse, December $ 200 00 

B. Sheppard's cabin, January 300 00 

West Block, January 5,000 00 

Arlington roadhouse, January 4,000 00 

J. J. Walker's cabin, Jannuary 450 00 

J. Phillip's cabin, February 400 00 

Home Bakery, March 300 00 

Shustin's cabin, April 500 00 

Empire block, April 19,200 00 

Oandolpho's point. May 21,850 00 

L. Cousin's cabin, September 200 00 

Preston's cold storage, October 1,000 00 

McDonald hotel, November 20,000 00 

Smaller fires during the year 6,000 00 

Total loss $ 79,500 00 



FIRE PROTECTION. 

We are now well protected against fire, with pails, axes, ladders and babcocks dis- 
tributed all over barracks, which are sufficient to extinguish any fire at its commence- 
ment. The Dawson Fire Hall is only about 150 yards from the barracks. 

Twenty-four babcocks were received from the outside during the past summer and 
are now distributed. 

We had several fire parades during the year, and all ranks turned out in a very 
creditablv short time. 



54 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
FORAGE. 

The hay and oats were supplied, as per contract made by the department, by the 
Upper Yukon ConsoKdated Company and were of a very fair quahty. 

GENERAL STATE OF DISTRICT. 

The Yukon Territory, and particularly Dawson and vicinity, has never experienced 
such a high degree of prosperity as during the past year. Of course during the rush of 
1897-8 there was a great deal more money changing hands continually, but it must be 
remembered that the population of Dawson and the surrounding country at that time 
was a ' floating ' one, whereas it is now more permanent. 

Unqualified success is the only phrase which can be used as regards the mining on 
the various creeks (see mining), while business failures among our Dawson merchants is 
a thing practically unheard of. All branches of mercantile life seem to thrive and appear 
at their best in this country. 

One venture, I wish most particularly to bring to your attention, is tliat of gardening 
in this country. I have spoken to several prominent gentlemen regarding this matter,, 
and I am of the opinion that the Government should be induced to offer better advan- 
tages to those who wish to follow agricultural pursuits in the Yukon. That this pursuit 
can be followed with advantage has been demonstrated during the past year and if more 
inducements were offered to prospective farmers, I am sure farming and gardening would 
soon become an established occupation. To one who would take the trouble to cross the 
Yukon River to West Dawson during the summer, and inspect the garden and hot houses 
there, he would be met with a very pleasing surprise, for there is to be seen all kinds of 
cereals — lettuce, radishes, peas, beans, carrots, potatoes, cauliflower, cabbage, celery, 
turnips, &c., in fact it, is an up-to-date market garden which would be a credit to any 
town on the outside." As for its success, the fact that Dawson and vicinity was almost 
exclusively supplied from this garden during the summer, speaks for itself. I might 
also add that this garden is only one of the many in the country, as excellent gardens 
were put in at Stewart River, Sixty Mile and on several of the creeks. Dr. J. N. E. 
Brown, tl^e secretary of the Yukon Territory, forwarded several samples of vegetables 
grown in ^is country to Vancouver, and the papers of that place gave some very flatter- 
ing reports on them. 

During the summer of 1900, the police planted their first garden, more for an ex- 
periment than anything else, and we were all very much surprised to find that the 
several messes were fairly well supplied with vegetables. This year we had a garden 
almost three times the size of that of last year and it proved to be an unqualified success, 
so much so that the messes were unable to use the crop. This garden has proved a 
great boon to the messes during the summer, as the prices of vegetables in vogue in 
Dawson are such that only those possessing a large income can have fresh vegetables 
Avith any degree of regularity. 

A new post office, court house, commissioner's house, school house and administra- 
tion buildings were erected during the year, and I must say that they would be a credit 
to any city. 

New conmiercial buildings were erected throughout the town and on the creeks, 
new forms sprang into existence, and general prosperity can be seen on every hand. 

New roads have been built throughout the country which have materially lessened 
the price of freighting to the creeks, which item is a matter of considerable moment to 
the miners. 

One is now enabled to travel all around the creeks and be assured of stopping at a 
comfortable roadhouse, as they are situated almost at every hand and take great pride 
in vieing with each other in the entertainment and comfort of their guests. 

GENERAL. 

Christmas of 1900 passed off very quietly, the division mess gave their annual 
Christmas dinner, which was a credit to the mess and was highly spoken of by all who 
attended it. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNES 55 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 ^ 

A regular epidemic of mad dogs occurred last winter, the cause of which no one- 
seems to be able to say. Many hundreds were killed and as the disease was so rapidly 
increasing very stringent measures were adopted. An ordinance was passed whereby 
every dog had to be muzzled, and w^hen not actually being worked, had to be tied up. 
Every dog found running at large was taken to the dog pound. This did not seem to 
stop the disease at all, so as a last resort orders were given to shoot every dog found 
running at large. With the advance of warmer weather the disease abated and I do 
not think it will develop this coming winter. 

The news of the death of Her Most Gracious Majesty, Queen Victoria, did not 
reach us until about the 26th January. The citizens of Dawson of every nationality 
gave proof of theif loyalty and respect by the closing of all business houses and draping 
their buildings in mourning. On the 31st a grand memorial service was held in the 
Savoy Theatre to which the police marched in a body. There was a great crowd in 
attendance and the doors had to be closed fully half an hour before the service com- 
menced. The various clergymen of Dawson took part in the service which was very im- 
pressive. On February 28 the division paraded, when I read the proclamation regard- 
ing the death of Her Majesty, and the ascension of His Majesty King Edward VII. to 
the Throne. 

In February the proprietors of gambling establishments and dance halls were 
notified that after March 16 all gambling must cease, and women would not be allowed 
to drink in any part of the buildings. This order was deferred, making the date for the 
closing down of gambling June 1. On this date the gambling was shut down without 
any disturbance, and a great number of the gamblers with their ' stock in trade ' left 
for the Cape Nome mining district. The closing of gambling in Dawson entailed a great 
deal more than the ordinary person is aware of. People living on the outside, not 
acquainted with the existing conditions of a country like this, cannot understand the 
class of people who flock to a mining camp. They do not realize that a great majority 
of the first people to inhabit a new cam}) are adventurers, confidence men, and men who 
will do almost anything but a day's labour ; they do not know that the population is 
made up of representatives of almost every country on earth ; they do not rea]ize how 
partial to gambling is the average miner. The closing down of the gambling has had 
the effect of making business more staple and solid. People now have money where 
before they had none. 

We have now a telephone line to Bonanza, Eldorado, Hunker, Dominion, Quartz 
and several of the ininor tributaries. 

The through telegraph line was finished this fall and, although it has not been 
working in as satisfactory manner as could be desired, I am sure that as soon as the 
employees are more familiar with the country the line passes through, the service will 
be all that could reasonably be expected. 

The 24th of May was very fittingly recognized this year, a grand series of sports 
took place, the police paraded and everyone seemed to thoroughly enjoy the holiday. 

The salmon catch in front of Dawson this year exceeded by far that of any year 
previous. For the latter part of July the average catch was something like 10,000 
pounds daily. The price of fresh salmon at the beginning of the season was $1 per 
pound, but the sudden flooding of the market quickly brought the price down to 10 centa 
per pound. The cold storage companies bought the salmon in large quantitiesT] 

On September 17 the sorrowful tidings reached Dawson that the President of the 
United States, William McKinley, had succumbed from the wounds he had received at 
the hands of an assassin. Flags were flown at half-mast on all buildings, and a telegram 
of sympathy was sent to the United States government by the citizens of Dawson. On 
Sunday the 29th the division paraded and attended the memorial service held in the 
Savoy Theatre in commemoration of the death of the late President. All the clergymen 
of the city took part and addresses were also delivered by the acting commissioner, Mr. 
Congdon, and others. Sincere sympathy was shown on all sides by all nationalities for 
the American people on account of the dastardly murder. 

It was reported on October 1 that a man named Elliott E. Jessup, lately a waiter 
in the Dawson Club, had been missing since September 26. Circulars were issued and 



66 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

sent to all the detachments ; photos of the missing man were sent to the more important 
stations. The last seen of him was in the vicinity of Klondike City where he was 
supposed to be a frequent visitor. Later developments proved that the man left Dawson 
suddenly on foot, going down the river to the 1 2 mile roadhouse, where he disposed of 
his mining property for a mere trifle and then purchased a small boat from the proprietor. 
This boat was shortly afterwards found capsized, but whether Jessup was drowned I 
cannot as yet state. The man had about $300 in wages due him from the Dawson Club 
and it is not known what caused him to leave so hurriedly ; he is supposed to have 
hinted to one of his friends that he had committed a criminal act which would land him 
in the jail for a couple of years, but we have l^een unable to find out any trouble the 
young man had got himself into. 

On October 17 a man named Dirmid Rankin reported that while he was on 
Oerman Creek staking a claim he had lost his partner John Mode. They had just 
finished staking and had started back for Dawson ; Rankin was ahead about a half a 
mile and he missed his partner. He left him some grub and came on to Dawson. 
Oerman Creek is on a trail about four miles below Fort Reliance and across country 
about thirty miles ; the country is very rough and bushy. Constables Bell and Tingley 
and Special Constable Linklater were sent out to endeavour to locate the missing man, 
but returned and reported that they had found no trace of him. It is the consensus of 
opinion that Mode slipped on a foot bridge over the 12-Mile River and was drowned. 
The 12-Mile at that point is very deep and dangerous. At time of writing there is 
another part}^ out searching for this unfortunate man. 

During the past year we have had many cases of indigents reported to us, and in 
every case I have reported the matter to the Commissioner of the Yukon Territory, 
through yourself, and obtained the necessar^^ authority to have the indigent brought to 
Dawson and taken to one of the hospitals. 

HORSES. 

The horses of ' B ' Division are all in good condition. All Creek detachments are 
now supplied with a horse, which greatly facilitates their work. 

During the past year, 9 horses were transferred to ' B ' Division, and with one or 
two exceptions were fair samples. 

I might state that the horses in ' B ' Division are far below the average police 
standard, but I must admit that taking everything into consideration, they have stood 
the work well. 

It is my intention to do a considerable amount of patrolling during the coming 
winter on the river trails, and horses will be a great improvement over dogs. 

A mounted patrol leaves the Post daily for the Creeks in the immediate vicinity 
of Dawson. This patrol consists of a N. C. ofiicer and three constables. 

In the North-west Territories we have the best horses in the country, but I regret 
to sa)^ that this state of affairs does not exist here. The freighters and business men in this 
country only import the very best horse flesh, and the comparison is not in our favour. 

HARNESS AND SADDLERY. 

The harness on charge in ' B ' Division is in a fair state of repair. That received 
from the outside during the past year, although of splendid quality, is too heavy for 
this country. 

The saddlery at present on charge is in good serviceable condition, and I would 
request that 6 double cincha saddles be sent in on the opening of navigation. 

INDIANS. 

There are several small villages of Indians in this district, the inhabitants of 
which live almost entirely by hunting and fishing. Taking them collectiveh^ they cause 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNEb 57 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

us very little trouble. The small camp at Hootchiku has caused none at all, those at 
Fort Selkirk are harmless and cause very little trouble except in the winter, when great 
vigilance has to be maintained to keep liquor from them. The Indians at Forty Mile 
are the worst off of any. They have been assisted a great deal during the year with 
rations and medicines, but from the fact that they have a resident missionary residing 
among them, they cause very little trouble. 

The Moosehides, at Moosehide, about a mile and a half from Dawson, are 
deteriorating very rapidly, instead of improving, by almost constant contact with the 
white people. Several cases of drunkenness occurred among them which were severely 
punished. They are a lazy tribe and are great gamblers. 

There are about 250 Indians stationed in the vicinity of McQuestin who live by 
hunting and fishing, but as last season was a poor one for them, they had to go to the 
police at that point for a great deal of assistance. The police medicine supply was 
exhausted and a further supply sent. Several of them died from exposure. 

During the past winter several parties of Peel River Indians came to Dawson with 
large outfits of caribou and moose, which they sold at a good profit. 

INSPECTIONS. 

All buildings in the post are inspected weekly by the officer commanding ' B ' 
division, and frequently by the officer commanding N.W.M. Police. The barracks are 
inspected daily by the orderly officer. The medical officer makes a weekly sanitary 
inspection. The arms are inspected weekly by the orderly officer. 

I have endeavoured to have all of our detachments inspected at least once a month. 
This I have carried out with regard to the Creek detachments, but owing to the small 
number of officers stationed here, I have found it impossible to have a monthly inspec- 
tion of the River detjichments. I would strongly recommend tliat at least three more 
officers be transferred here, as then I would be able to have one continually on the trail 
during the winter months, which would greatly facilitate the better performance of the 
arduous work of the River detachments. I am glad to state, however, that I have been 
particularly fortunate in having good, steady and most reliable non-commissioned officers 
and constables in charge of the detachments, and I am pleased to say that the miners, 
and other civilians, are unanimous in their opinion that the ' police boys,' as they call 
them, are fair and just to one and all alike, showing no partiality to any, and this fact 
is borne out by our receiving no complaints against those in charge of the detachments. 

LIQUOR LICENSES AND PERMITS. 

Under this heading I do not wish to say anything, as the officer commanding 
N.W.M. Police, Yukon territory will, in all probability report fully on the subject. 

MAIL SERVICE. 

The mail contract is still in the hands of the British Yukon Navigation Company, 
lately the Canadian Developement Co., and speaking in a general manner, the mail 
service has been satisfactory. 

The winter and summer service could not be better, and the only cause of complaint 
has been, I think, a little tardiness on the part of the company during the period of 
opening and closing of navigation. Of course in a complaint like this the matter is 
simply one of 'opinions differing,' the company looking toward the safety of both the 
mail and their employees' lives, and the ' kickers,' of which there are many in Dawson, 
demanding a mail service when it is a practical impossibility to get it here without 
placing the lives of the carriers, and the mail, in constant danger. 

NAVIGATION. 

The ice in the Yukon broke away on May 14, and the first steamer to arrive in Daw- 
son was the Leon from winter quarters at Stewart river, on May 22. The steamers 



^ NORTH-WEST IdOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Bailey and Clifford Sifton were the first steamers to arrive from the Up-river, arriving 
on the 23rd. The first steamer to leave Dawson for White Horse, was the Zelandian^ 
on the 25th. 

Navigation on the Yukon could hardly be improved upon, the British Yukon Navi- 
gation Company putting on three new steamers, the White Horse, Selkirk and Dawson^ 
which are a credit to them and to the Yukon. Roughly speaking a steamer arrived and 
■departed from Dawson every day during the open season. ^ 

PAY. 

Regarding the pa}", I beg to draw jouy attention to the rate of pay for all ranks 
serving in the Yukon Territory, and especially that of the officers. An officer in this 
country has to uphold his position and is greatly handicapped when compared with em- 
ployees of other departments, and other branches of business in town. I think that it 
would be a mistake if the officers did not endeavour to keep up a social position equal to 
that of bank clerks, the employees of the large companies, and other government offi- 
cials. The lowest pay given by any of the banks to their messengers is ^100 per month 
and living allowance and everything found. In the Gold Commissioner's office, the junior 
clerks receive $100 per month and $150 living allowance. An ordinary clerk receives 
anywhere from $150 to $350 per month, and in many instances the larger firms have 
their mess houses for the employees. Stenographers receive on an average of $350 per 
month. 

Expenses are such in this country that it is a constant worry to officers, non-com- 
missioned officers and constables to make both ends meet, and in some instances we are 
losing experienced and valuable men just because they see nothing in the future, and no 
increase in pay ; naturally they wish to better their condition, so leave the force. 

PENITENTIARY. 

In making my report for the penitentiary and jail for the past year, I might say 
that I am well pleased with the discipline maintained by the Prevost Sergeant, Staff 
Sergeant Tweedy, who is a steady, diligent and painstaking non-commissioned officer. I 
regret to say that Staff Sergeant Tweedy has applied for his discharge, and it is his inten- 
tion to join the South African Constabulary. 

Four hundred and ninety-six (496) prisoners were confined during the year, com- 
prising : — 

Whites — male • • • • 447 

II female 21 

Indians — male 2 

II female 5 

Lunatics 21 

Total 496 

Number of convicts confined 23 

II II in common jail at hard labour ... . 81 

Total sentenced 104 

Maximum number in any one day 55 

Minimum number in any one day 27 

Daily average for year 40 • 20 

Number of prisoners confined at midnight November 30, 1901, was 39. 
For further particulars see synopsis on page 60. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNES 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Synopsis of Daily Sick Reports, Dawson Jail, 1901. 

(Figures denote number of days off work. ) 



No. 


i 

Q 


i 




1 


1 

< 






3 


do 






> 


Remarks. 


1 P P 


16* 








1 
1 
















*Operation ; tumour removed. 


2 n 






















3 „ 








5 
3 














8 




4 11 








' 














5 M 










5 
2 


... 




1 
"i 








6 ti .... 






1 

1 








..' 






7 II 














9 I. 








5 












10 „ 










4 


4 












11 tt 
















6 
4 


.... 


1 




12 II 

13 M . ... 


1 

2 




2 
4 




14 M . . 
















15 „ 




























16 „ 












3 





2 

1 






2 






17 11 














1 




18 M 












•• 


7 




19 .. . . , 
























IF.P.P.. . 

2F.P.P 










6 


.3i* 


30 


3i 


31 ■ 


'so' 


ii' 


■36' 


Pulmonary and eye-sight. 















EXECUTIONS. 

One George O'Brien was hanged, by Mr. Sheriff Eilbeck, on August 23, 1901, for 
the murder of Lynn Wallace Relfe, at Minto, on or about December 25, 1899. 

The tribute of every citizen and alien in the Yukon Territory has been tendered to 
the Government upon this masterpiece of justice, so unerringly brought to a successful 
issue, regardless of expense. 

DEATH SENTENCE COMMUTED. 

His Excellency the Governor General, was pleascjd to commute the death sentence 
in the undermentioned cases to life imprisonment, viz. : 

James Slorah, sentenced to be hanged on March 1, 1901, for the murder of Pearl 
Mitchell, at Dawson. 

George Thomas St. Cyr, sentenced to be hanged on June 7, 1901, for the murder of 
one Davis, at Hootalinqua. 

ACCIDENTAL DEATHS. 

One John Wright Wroth, arrested May 31, 1901, died at 2 p.m., while still intoxi- 
cated. The coroner's jury brought in a verdict, ' that the deceased came to his death 
from heart failure, superinduced by the excessive use of alcoholic liquors.' 



PARDONS. 



Notification was received from the Secretary of State of the following pardons hav- 
ing been granted, viz. : — 



Name. 


Crime. Sentence. 

1 
i 


Date. 


Remarks. 


Conway, William H 


Embezzlement . . 
Theft. 


3 years. 

5 M 


January 8, 1901. 
July 14, 1901. 


Unconditional. 


Hespler, Alfred 


To leave Territory. 









NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
NORTH-WEST MOUNTED 



Synopsis of Prisoners Confined during 





- 


Penitenti-\ky. 


Common Jail. 


Crime and Offence. 


Sentence in Years. 


Sentence in Months. 




2 


14 
1 


7 
3 


5 
4 


'3i 

1 


3 
4 


2i 


2 

4 


21 

1 


IS 

1 


12 
2 


8 


7 


6 
5 


4 


3 

1 

i 


2 
2 

i 


1 


Prisoners confined Nov. 30, 1900 


2 


Assault • 
























Stftbbiner 


































Rape 




































































T<^iYh<irt'.inri 














1 






















TT<'«i«*iV>rf>n.lrinp' 




















































. . . . 






















T*prinrv . 




















































1 














Theft 


















... 


1 








2 






q 


"Rpppiviner stolen DroDertv 


















Fravid 






















1 














































Obtaining money under false pretences 

IVrieannrnnria.t'lon of imblic funds. 


















.... 












2 








































1 






IVTiepViipf 






























































ThreateninoT to shoot 






































T^rpnViiio" inil 




























1 








































Wifp-bpa.tinP" 






































Vflcrrflnov . ... 
































2 






































Drunk and disorderly 


























_— — ■ 




^~~ 




1 




2 




























— 


— 






1 














































































riivino' linnnr tn Tndians. . . . 










































































TnrJpppnf, PVimsiirP , . 






































ViMlifinn of lionor ordinance . . 






































'"Jolli-nrr liniioi' wif.Vlont llfftTlSfi 






































dontpmiit, 






































r^QiiiQci imnrissoTi'mpnt ... 


















.... 








































. 


















Tiiiiifl t"ir^« 



























.... 












Totals 


2 


1 


3 


5 


1 


5 


:- 


6 


1 


1 


4 


1 




10 


7 


6 


13 


14 







REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNE8 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 
POLICE JAIL. 



61 



year ended November 30, 190L 



Common Jail. 




I 

1 


§05 


t 

S 


1^ 


1 




t 


Committed 

AND 

Awaiting 
Trial. 








Sentence in Days, 


Con- 
fined. 


Out 

on 

Bail. 




35 


30 


20 


15 


14 


10 


8 


7 
1 


3 


2 


,1 












6 




38 


































1 


3 












1 




1 






13 


16 




1 










1 


35 


























1 
























1 
1 


















1 




































1 


1 


4 




































1 
























1 


















1 








































1 
























2 


.... 




... 












3 
























1 














••• 


1 








31 
2 

5 

















1 

"i 


55 






















2 






































8 






































1 
























2 














1 




4 




































1 










































3 






















2 


2 
4 

1 


















4 






































4 






















2 


















3 






































1 






















2 




















2 








1 
1 














1 
8 
1 
11 
2 
1 


















2 




















3 


2 
















20 
































1 








1 


1 




1 




2 


1 
1 


200 
18 

1 
1 
1 










1 




1 




227- 












22 




































2 








1 






























2 


































2 






















1 






































• 1 






































1 




































1 








































1 

2 

2 

12 


























1 




















5 










3 


11 


























1 
8 






1 
1 




































21 








■ 
























.... 


2 


3 


5 


1 

1 


3 


1 


3 


2 


2 


245 


111 


3 

1 


1 


5 


9 


1 


1 


11 


7 


496 



Certified correct. 



GEO. W. TWEEDY, 

Provost. 



28—13 



62 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

TICKET OF LEAVE. 

One prisoner, sentenced October 19, 1900, by Mr. Justice Dugas to six months' 
imprisonment with hard labour was released on a ticket of leave February 8, 1901. 
This is the first case of a ticket of leave being granted in the Yukon Territory. 

CONVICTS, TIME EXPIRED. 

Two convicts were discharged, their times having expired, during the past year. 

ESCAPES AND RECAPTURES. 

Convict George Nicholls, No. 14, escaped from his escort on the 5 th December, 
1900, but was recaptured three hours later. 

He was subsequently arraigned before the Hon. Mr. Justice Craig and sentenced to 
six months at hard labour additional. 

PRISON DISCIPLINE AND CONDUCT. 

The conduct and discipline for the past year has been well maintained and the con- 
duct of the prisoners of all classes has been satisfactory. 

HEALTH OF PRISONERS. 

The health of the prisoners for the past year has been exceptionally good through- 
out the whole jail. 

This is the first year that we have been entirely free from scurvy. 

FOOD. 

The food supplied during the past year was much better than has been supplied in 
former years and was in every way satisfactory. 

EMPLOYMENT. 

During the past year the prisoners and convicts were employed in the following 
manner, viz.: — 

Drainage, levelling up of grounds, cutting wood and general scavenging work. This 
has all been done by unskilled prison labour. Considerable good work has been per- 
formed by convicts and other prisoners as shown below : — 

Fitting up the old water tank as a temporary insane asylum, containing two padded 
and nine common cells and an exercise yard, 22 x 22 x 10. 

Erection of wagon bridges across slough in rear of hospital, 100 feet long, 12 feet 
wide, 2 trestles, centre trestle 15 feet high, stout rail on either sides, all hewn from 
rough logs. 

Town station re-floored, 47 x 21, and kitchen, 12 x 18, sidewalks completed around 
barracks square, transport shed built, 61 x 18, canteen cellar excavated in frozen ground 
42 x 12 x 18, floored and lined with 2-in. plank, engine house, 18 x 12, stable addition, 
30 X 20. Old mud roof removed and replaced by shingles on the undermentioned build- 
ings : headquarters block, division office block. No. 2 barrack room block, gaol, dog 
pound and keeper's cabin. 

In addition some bench work has been done, a blacksmith kept employed, also an 
engineer, driver and fitter. Painters and gardeners were also employed. 

An attempt was made to manufacture rope mats for sale and some very high-class 
work was turned out, but the first cost of the rope, 10c. per pound, the limited quantity 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNES 63 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

available, the small demand for mats, and a shipment of cheap cocoa mats from the out- 
side, blocked the market. 

ALTERATIONS AND REPAIRS TO GUARDROOM. 

* B ' block of eighteen cells was reconstructed, sheeted with steel and sheeted over 
with matched lumber and a new floor laid on the whole block with sheet steel under the 
flooring in cells. 

An additional skylight, 4 ft. x 4 ft. and gratings was also put in. 

The mud roof was removed and replaced by shingle roof. 

ALTERATIONS AND REPAIRS NEEDED IN GUARDROOM. 

The cells in 'A' block require Meeting as is already done in ' B ' block. 

JAIL EQUIPMENT. 

The locks, shackles, handcuffs and balls and chains are all in good condition. 

LUNATICS. 

Twenty-one prisoners were confined in this class for an average number of 53 • 60 

rs. 

Eight were transferred to New Westminster Insane Asylum, and twelve discharged 
after treatment as fit to be at large. 

The only one now on hand is a hopeless case, and if possible should be sent out to 
New Westminster. 

A temporary asylum was fitted up and used during the winter and up to June 16, 
when the accumulation of seven were sent out. 

ESCORTS, EFFICIENCY, PAY AND SYSTEM IN PENITENTIARY. 

Apparently it is not the intention of the Government to build a penitentiary in the 
Yukon Territory and the management of convicts ^vill remain in the police hands, and 
such being the case a permanent staff, night and day, is necessary ; as it is, the whole 
division is more or less in contact with convicts and other prisoners, which is un- 
desirable. 

Better work, and more of it, would be performed by prisoners if we had the 
permanent staff in vogue. 

In the case of an emergency occurring at night, a guard must know exactly what 
to do, how to do it and waste no time, and this standard of efficiency can only be 
attained by a well trained staff. 

The rate of extra pay granted in 1898 when conditions were totally different still 
pertains ; at that time the proportion of convicts was one in ten, now it is, taking the 
average for the year, more than half. 

A report re permanent staff was submitted with last year's jail report. This matter 
should be gone into, and in the meantime I would strongly recommend that extra pay 
for escorts be increased to the Yukon working pay rate, namely 50 cents per diem. 

With a permanent staff a system could be used, on penitentiary lines, thereby 
saving men, ensuring security and better discipline of convicts and others. 

SUPPLIES. 

The supplies received during the past year have been, as a rule, of a good quality. 

I attach hereto the estimates for the coming year and would recommend that, owing 
to the difficulties in transportation, and the fact that they have to be shipped from the 
outside, they be sent so that they will arrive here before the closing of navigation. 
28-131 



64 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

SANITARY CONDITION OF DAWSON. 

I am glad to say that the sanitary condition of Dawson is something which the 
residents may well be proud of. To convert a swamp, or slough, into a townsite and 
then bring the sanitary condition of the town to such a degree of excellence arrived at 
here is a matter of congratulation for the officials to whom this good work is due. 

During the winter the garbage dumps were situated in the centre of the river, the 
whole of w^hich passed away with the ice. 

During the summer, garbage scows were placed at convenient places along the river 
and their contents emptied into the Yukon. 

The Police at the town station were especially vigilant in their crusade against dirty 
and filthy back yards and alleys, and to this fact, to a great extent, is due the good results 
attained. The non-commissioned officer in charge of the town station is the sanitary 
inspector for Dawson. At all times the police have worked in unison with the medical 
health officer. 

Yery few cases of typhoid fever occurred during the past year. 

The small-pox epidemic was, on account of the very stringent measures adopted, 
confined to a very few and I am pleased to report that no fatality occurred among the 
patients. Compulsory vaccination was the order of the day and I must say that the 
people made very little complaint against it. 

Quite a number of deaths occurred from pneumonia, the cause of which, I believe, 
was the extreme cold weather we experienced last winter. 



TOWN STATION AND POLICE DUTIES. 

Two non-commissioneed officers and twelve constables have been stationed at the 
Town Station during the past year, making a day and a night shift of one non-commis- 
sioned officer and six constables each. 

The work of the Town Station has, I consider, been well performed under the 
existing circumstances. Owing to the shifting and unstable population, some of the 
most experienced detectives, and some of our best men have reported Dawson as being 
one of the hardest places in which to do police work. 

In large cities the detectives have all the lodging houses, saloons, houses of doubtful 
character, etc., located, so that when anything occurs, they can at once surmise the 
perpetrators, while here, some of the crooks live on the creeks and some in town ; they 
come and go and never stay in the same place twice. 

We are, however, getting more experienced with this class of people and are 
organizing better for the supervision of the bad class. 



TRANSPORT. 

Our limited supply of transport is in a very serviceable condition, but now that the 
Government has expended such a large amount of money on new trails, we will require a 
complete new outfit. We will require 2 buckboards single, 2 buckboards double, 1 
spring wagon, 1 wagon heavy, 2 cutters single, a cutters double (light bobs), 1 sleigh 
heavy. 

CANOES. 

The canoes will probably last during the coming summer, but no longer. It must 
be remembered that they have been in use for four years and have necessarily received 
some hard usage, but none unnecessarily. They are rotting on the bottoms very fast, 
and, although we have painted them every season, nothing seems to lay the rotting. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR STARNES 



65 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



OFFICERS, CHANGES IN. 



Supt. Primrose arrived from White Horse on March 27, and took over the command 
of the division. He left for the outside on three months leave on October 13. 

Inspt. Cosby arrived from White Horse on transfer on the March 27. He is now 
Acting Pa}TTiaster. 

Inspt. Wroughton arrived on transfer from Regina on March 20. He is now 
Acting Quarter Master and is in charge of the collection of royalty for the Dawson 
district. 

Inspt. Howard arrived on transfer on June 18, but was re-transferred to 'H' 
Division on July 10. 

Inspt. Scarth was transferred to the North-west Territories and left Dawson on 
September 11. 

Inspt. McDonell is in charge of the Criminal Investigation Department. 

Inspt. Routledge is stationed at Grand Forks and has a general supervision of the 
Creek detachments. 

Supt. Wood was on two months' leave during the past summer in Eastern Canada. 

Inspt. Starnes was on two months' leave during the past summer. 

Assistant Surgeon Thompson returned off leave on the opening of navigation. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon Madore, who is stationed at Selkirk, was on two months' 
leave during the past summer in Eastern Canada. 

DISTRIBUTION. 



Place. 




t 

GO 

s 
1— 1 


u 

< 


1 


1 


O 


a 


^ 
^ 


i 


Total. 


Dawson .... 


1 


4 


1 


4 


2 
1 

1 


5 

1 

...... 

1 

1 
1 
1 


48 
12 
5 
2 
2 
1 
2 
4 
2 
3 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 


15 
1 
1 

1 


2 

i ' 


82 


Town Station 


15 


Grand Forks 








8 


Dominion. . ... 




4 


Hunker 








4 


Gold Run . . 




2 


Sulphur 

Forty Mile 

Indian River 










..... 


3 









• • • 


5 
2 


Ogilvie 






3 


Stewart River. . 


1 




3 


Half Way 




2 


Selwyn 














"i" 

1 

"i" 









2 


Selkirk 






1 




1 





4 


Minto • 






3 


Hootchiku 














2 


McQuestin 








"i 


1 





3 


Eureka ... 




2 


Dog Island . 








2 


On Leave 


1 


















1 










Total 


2 


5 


2 


5 


7 


11 


95 


22 


3 


152 



LOSS AND GAIX. 



Loss. 



Discharged : — 5 non-commissioned officers ; 28 constables. 

Transferred to other Divisions : — 2 officers ; 4 non-commissioned officers ; 15 
constables. 

Deserted : — 5 constables. 

Total loss to division : — 2 officers ; 9 non-commissioned officers ; 48 constables. 



66 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
Gain, 

Re-engaged after leaving : — 6 constables. 

Transferred from other divisions : — 4 officers ; 6 non-commissioned officers ; 51 
constables. 

Total gain to division : — 4 officers ; 6 non-commissioned officers ; 57 constables. 

Recapitulation* 

Gain of 2 officers and 9 constables. 
Loss of 3 non-commissioned officers. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR JARVIS 67 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



APPENDIX 0. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF INSPECTOR A. M. JARVIS, C.M.G. 
DALTON TRAIL. 



North-west Mounted Police, 

Dalton Trail Post Detachment. 

Supt. A. E. Snyder, 

Commanding ' H ' Division, 

Upper Yukon District, White Horse, 

Sir, — I have the honour to render my report of services performed on the Dalton 
Trail for the year ending November 30, 190L 

I resumed command here on May 15, having on my return from South Africa 
received orders from the Comptroller to report at Regina, and there got instructions to 
report to you at White Horse. 

district in general. 

The district has seen little advancement during the past year from a commercial 
standpoint ; this is due, I take it, to the decline of the Klondyke boom and the fewer 
prospectors coming in provided with ' stakes,' together with the lack of transportation 
and the difficulty of working the placer deposits of Porcupine and Bear Creeks ; I shall 
touch on these under the heading of mining. 

This district appears to have an important future before it, and as public interest 
is being aroused by the proposal to build the Chilcat Pass railway, and it being tributary 
to Pyramid Harbour which has figured so prominently in the Alaskan boundary contro- 
versy, I shall again draw your attention to some of the most important conditions. 

The Lynn canal, at its head, is divided into two arms, at the head of the right 
hand one lies Skaguay and Dyea, while the left hand one constitutes Pyramid Harbour. 
Haine's Mission is situated on the separating neck of land and the locality embraces a 
beautiful town site. 

Up from Pyramid Harbour lies the Chilcat Valley, broad and flat, in fact there is 
ample evidence that the lower part of the valley, for some distance above Klukwan, was 
formerly an arm of the sea which has been filled by glacial drift and silt. The oldest 
inhabitants of Haines say that a noticeable change exists in Pyramid Harbour at the 
present time from ten years ago, and if their accounts be correct, and this ratio is kept 
up, it is only a matter of a few years till Pyramid Harbour is no more. 

As a mining man said to me, ' The marked difierence which exists between this, the 
Chilcat Pass, and the White and Chilcoot (Dyea) Passes, is accounted for, in that 
whereas the latter lie between mountains of hard and unyielding granite, the rocks 
composing the mountains of the Chilcat watershed are mostly of the softer sediments, 
which have yielded to the general glaciation, the result being broad and flat valleys.* 
It has always appeared a pity to me that the builders of the White Pass and Yukon 
Railway had not selected this route for their line, as a much better grade could have 



68 NORTH. WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

been obtained, and the snow gives much less trouble. In fact the innermost limit of 
the heavy snowfall is pretty well reached at Rainy Hollow, at which point the road 
would leave the heavy timber. There would be no snowslides to encounter on the 
whole distance. I may say that the cost of handling the snow and ice of the White 
Pass and Yukon Railway as per their balance-sheet for last year was $97,561. 

CRIME. 

This district has been comparatively free from crime during the past year. 

IMINiyG AND PROSPECTING. 

The mining of the district, so far as British Columbia is concerned, is confined to 
the placer at Bear Creek and Glacier Creek, and the mineral deposits at Rainy Hollow. 

At Bear Creek, Mr. J. K. Mankowski, who controls a number of claims there, 
attempted to reach the bed of the creek by the aid of 'wingdams,' this proved an unsatis- 
factory mode of working, as, owing to the mountainous nature of the country, a few 
hours' rain causes a sudden rising of the river, so much is this a fact that Mr. Man- 
kowski's ' dams ' were thrice washed out and it was not until the middle of October that 
he succeeded in reaching the pay-streak. Gold has now been found on the benches and 
these deposits will probably prove of greater economic value than the creek bottom, as 
with them the necessity of handling the madly rushing torrent is lacking. 

The gold found on Bear Creek are much different in character from that found on 
Porcupine, being less coarse and worn. 

On Glacier Creek, which it will be remembered was staked by the Porcupine miners 
and came under our jurisdiction by terms of the modus vivendi, the assessment on several 
1,500 X 600 ft. (20 acres) claims is being done, British Columbia titles having been 
secured for same. This is fortunate, as on this particular creek, a 250 ft. square claim 
would be of little value according to what is known at present of the creek ; while 20 
acres with plenty of timber and water convenient, presents good possibilities of paying 
under hydraulic treatment, and the creek is adapted for this. ^ 

On the other hand, however, many American miners keep on doing assessment on 
claims to which they have made no attempt to secure British Columbia titles, making 
records concerning same with the United States commissioner at Porcupine. Should 
anything rich be struck, there would no doubt be trouble ; as it is, the relations existing 
between our own people and the Alaska miners are most cordial, and I trust will con- 
tinue to be so. 

The mineral deposits at Rainy Hollow have received the attention due them in the 
way of assessment work, but as individuals have numerous holdings, nothing outside of 
this has been done ; what little was accomplished, has, on the whole, been satisfactory, 
and it appears as if the place would yet see a mining camp. Several ' experts ' have 
paid the claims a visit, some of whom seem to be responsible men and have reported 
very favourably on them, but this country is flooded by men who claim to be backed by 
millions, generally the creation of their own fancy. The district has vast resources 
which can only be developed by cheap transportation. Of the ' inside, ' as 
the Yukon in general is termed here, and in particular that portion tributary 
to the Chilcat Pass, there come very favourable reports. On Alder and Shorty Creeks, 
thirty miles north-west of Dal ton House, a party of five or six prospectors have 
been working all summer aud intend wintering there. The creeks were prospected 
extensively in 1898 and though then proved to be high class hydraulic propositions, no 
rich pay was found. For a great area through this country prospects are found, 
and these men, with the grit characteristic of the prospector are still hot on the trail of 
the seductive nugget. Over the divide from Shorty Creek to the south, Mr. Charles 
Towl and his partner, discovered a creek of good promise, to which, after much thought, 
they conferred the euphonious name of ' Mush Creek ' ; the reason of this name I am 
told, is that, in the initial stages of their prospecting, after locating pay, the larder was 
reduced to oatmeal, which necessitated a diet of 'mush,' as porridge is universally called 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR JARVIS 69 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

in the north. However unmusical a name the creek may bear, it is undoubtedly one of 
great promise, and upon the news becoming known a stampede took place which drained 
the united population of Porcupine. Mr. Towl tells me that the creek is one that can 
be easily worked, with plenty of dry and green timber close at hand. The distance to 
bed rock he gives as from two to six feet, with a large admixture of quartz in the gravel. 
The district is easily accessible from Dalton House. 

Operations on Porcupine Creek were carried on this season on a much more exten- 
sive scale than ever before, but returns were not equal to expectations. This can be 
accounted for, not so much by the absence of gold, as the difficulty in handling the water 
of the creek. The stream being fed by from six to ten glaciers, a few hot days have 
the same effect as a downpour of rain. This, together with the considerable depth to 
bed-rock, makes mining difficult. There is no doubt, however, that the creek is rich, 
and big sums are being expended, especially by Mr. Jack Dalton, owner of Discovery, in 
lifting the creek by flumes. Production is also retarded by the large size of the claims, 
the paying portion being in the hands of the few. 

On McKinley Creek, a tributary of the Porcupine, a party of miners known as the 
McKinley Creek Mining Company, put in a flume by which abundance of water is at 
hand for hydraulicing, with a head of from three to four hundred feet. With this, and 
a light canvas hose, the bench gravels were proved to carry a good margin of profit. 
Having successfully flumed and worked the creek-bottom, the intention is, next season, 
to increase the plant with steel piping, and by utilizing a high pressure to pipe off the 
benches, using the bed of the stream as a dump ; the company will realize a handsome 
profit. 

DISCIPLINE, 

The discipline of the Dalton Trail Detachments has been excellent, all the men 
faithfully performing their duties. Corporal Todd has shown himself to be a hard- 
working and reliable N.C. officer. 

TRAILS, 

The British Columbia Government has built two much needed trails, one from the 
provisional boundary line at Wells to Bear Creek, a distance of ten miles, and one from 
Wells to Rainy Hollow, passing this post, a distance of thirty-five miles. The Bear 
Creek miners have continued their trail to Clear Creek, twenty miles further up. The 
trail from Wells passing up the Klehini Valley to this post, through to Rainy Hollow, 
is of great assistance to us, as it allows continuous communication between Wells and 
here ; as you no doubt observed when here, travelling up and down the river bottom 
during high water, is not unattended by danger. Though the trail is passable for horses 
it is by no means what it should be. I understand that the appropriation for trails for 
the Chilcat division was limited to the work from Wells to Rainy Hollow. The rush to 
Bear Creek, however, induced those in charge to direct their attention to affording access 
to these claims, which took considerable money, and left them short for the main work. 
The miners of Raim^ Hollow have petitioned the Provincial Government to make further 
appropriation so that a good wagon road may be built from Wells to that place. This 
would enable the higher grades of ores of the camp to be shipped at a profit. It 
would have the effect of lessening the cost of supplies, and as the work could be 
cheaply done and its completion would be a great inducement to prospectors to go to the 
' inside,' I sincerely hope the British Columbia Government may grant the request. 

The Dalton trail, which is the pioneer route to the ' inside,' is much in need of 
repairs. I would in this connection like to draw jo\xv attention to the vast* area that is 
tributary to this trail. From the Yukon River to the 141st parallel, and as far north as 
the White River, the Dalton trail is the main artery. Three years before the Klondike 
was heard of, Mr. Dalton blazed his route into the interior, acting as guide to the 
explorers, in which he has done important work, or trading in furs. When the rush to 
the gold fields took place he spent large sums in bridges and corduroy, especially between 



70 2iORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Dalton House and Five Fingers, which now that the Yukon has the monopoly of freight 
and passengers brings him no return. While its construction was a business venture, 
yet it remains a benefit to the country, and is of great value to the prospector. I should 
like to see Mr. Dalton recompensed for his unprofitable outlay, 

MAILS AND POST OFFICES. 

In August last the U. S. Government opened a post office at Porcupine and 
appointed Mr. T. G. Woodruff, postmaster, and on November 1 a first class mail route 
was established. This is a great convenience for us, and it gives us a weekly service in 
place of a fortnightly one. 

A petition was circulated some months ago and forwarded to Capt. W. J. Rant, 
S.M., asking that a post office be established at Wells, B.C. This would be a very great 
boon to the N.W.M.P., the B.C. Government officials, and to the miners of Bear Creek ; 
as it is now, these people are dependent on the U.S. Chilcat Indians, a most unreliable 
set of people, for the safe delivery of all their mail from Haines, U.S.A. 

FISH, GAME AND FUR BEARING ANIMALS. 

I am informed that the Stick Indians at Dalton House were not so successful as in 
preceding years in their catch of fur. Numerous mountain goat, sheep and bear have 
been killed by the prospectors at Bear Creek and Rainy Hollow. In regard to the 
larger game, I may say that while in the vicinity of Dalton House on my way in to 
inspect that detachment in August last, our party frightened three bands of sheep off 
the trail, about one hundred in all, and their stampede up the mountain side was a sight 
beautiful and unique. In this same vicinity, caribou and ptarmigan are very numerous. 
The bag of the Dalton Trail Post, and Dalton House detachments, for the season con- 
sisted of six bears and about ten mountain sheep and goat, besides ptarmigan and grouse 
in abundance. 

INDIANS. 

The head chief of the Sticks, Ka-sa-ar, died in August last while on a hunting trip. 
He had been ailing for the past year and was cremated with all due ceremony and his 
successor appointed. Mr. Dal ton's trading post at Dalton House was broken into while 
Reg. No. 3704 Const. Field was on patrol, and, although every effort was made to find 
out who committed the theft, no clue could be obtained. A few caches were also said 
to have been broken into at Rainy Hollow, but whether this could be attributed to white 
men or Indians is a mystery. 

The Chilcats gave us some little anxiety last summer. Word was received from 
Mr. Busby, Inspector of Customs for the Yukon frontier, to collect duty on all boats, 
canoes and skiffs passing up the Chilcat river, via the AYells Detachment. This was 
done, and the Indians showed a ver}^ resentful spirit. While Asst. -Surgeon Fraser was 
inspecting at the Wells detachment a large deputation of Indians waited on him. 
Shortly after Mr. Busby visited the outports on the trail and gave orders to refund all 
money collected to date and to desist from further exactions. This saved any further 
trouble as far as we were concerned. 

In June last a small steamer was put on the Chilcat river to carry freight up as far 
as Kluckwan. After a few trips both ways the Indians fbund that it was going to in- 
terfere with their business, so one night, after the engineer had retired to his tent on the 
shore, they set fire to his boat and he awoke in the morning to find his little steamer burned 
to the watei^s edge. The owner at once substituted another boat and compromised by 
employing Billy Dickinson, a Chilcat half-breed, as pilot, and an Indian as assistant. 
They threatened to kill the owner, but an officer and thirteen men of the U. S, 24th 
Infantry were sent down from Skagway and remained about a month at Haines. The 
steamer was not a success. It is to be replaced next year by one wdth stronger machin- 
ery. These Chilcat Indians are the worst it has ever been my misfortune to deal with. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR JAR VIS 71 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

We have nothing on the plains to equal them for general 'cussedness,' as the Yankee 
styles their proclivities. Unfortunately, they experience very little difficulty in getting 
whiskey. 

DOGS. 

Of the eleven dogs on charge at the beginning of the year, there are eight remain- 
ing on hand. An additional eight were sent over from White Horse and arrived at 
Wells on October 28 in good condition. 

CLOTHING. 

The clothing supplied the men is of excellent quality and all that could be desired, 

PROVISIONS. 

The provisions during the year have been supplied by the Porcupine Trading Com- 
pany, and have been delivered monthly to the Dalton Trail post, and, during the sum- 
mer months, to the Wells detachment. This is very satisfactory to us as the goods are 
always fresh, and it does away with any possibility of stores becoming damaged, as 
would be the case if consignments were delivered at long intervals. The company made 
a reduction in their freight rates this last summer, and a still further one is promised 
with the improvement in transportation. 

FORAGE. 

The quality of hay and oats supplied by the Porcupine Trading Company duiing 
the year has been good, and the forage is well stored. 

FIVE FINGER RAPIDS PATROL. 

Two patrols have gone over the Dalton trail to Five Fingers and returned. The 
first consisted Corp. Todd and Constable Povoas, which left this post on July 10 and 
returned August 4. The second, composed of Constable Stanbridge and Special Constable 
Johnny. Corporal Todd and Constable Stanbridge both report the trail to the Yukon 
river in very bad shape between Dalton House and Five Fingers, there being several 
bad bogs and considerable fallen timber. They warned Indians against setting out fires 
which they light up for the purpose of signalling, and also, it is believed, to destroy the 
underbrush over vast tracts, that they may hunt the easier. Corporal Todd found a 
man by the name of D. W. Dawson, an old Yukon miner, near Hootchi ; he had been 
without food for fifteen days, and was in a very weak condition when he arrived here. 
He received medical treatment from Asst. Surgeon Fraser, and in a short time was able 
to proceed to the coast. 

CUSTOMS, 

Asst. Surgeon Fraser has acted as collector of customs at this port. The constable 
in charge at Wells has also acted in this capacity, while one constable was stationed at 
Glacier Creek in the early part of the season. Quite a few good men intended to take 
in machinery, boilers, &c., and sink to bed-rock on Glacier Creek, but when they found 
duty would be charged on everything they took in, they withdrew their intentions and 
no development outside of bare assessment work has been done, and the Creek is in 
much the same condition as last year. The amount collected this year was very small, 
being limited to exaction on prospector's outfits and Indians. The fact that duty is 
collected on prospectors ' outfits ' has the effect of retarding the development of our 
district. 



72 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

FISHERIES. 

The salmon pack at Pyramid Harbour and Chilcat has only been half what it 
usually is, namely, 24,000 cases. The Western Fisheries Association, a new trust 
formed this year, had a large number of fishing boats at the mouth of the Alsec, which 
accounts for the shortage in fish at Dalton House this year. 

I have had several thousand pounds of green fish put up for dog feed at Dalton 
Trail Post and if the weather remains cold it will keep in good condition. 

ACCIDENTS. 

There have been no fatal accidents on the trail this year. In September, Henry 
Girtz, prospector, while returning with a party up Bear Creek to pack down some goat 
they had killed on the day previous, was attacked by a bear, which had two cubs, and 
was very badly bitten on the hand and leg. None of the party were armed. 

■ HORSES. 

The horses sent over from White Horse in May last proved very satisfactory. 
Horse Reg. No. 2527, on September 5, while crossing one of the bridges on the new 
trail to Rainy Hollow, fell with one of its hind legs jammed in between two logs ; the 
leg being broken he had to be shot. 

BUILDINGS AND REPAIRS. 

At Dalton Trail Post, new quarters were built for me, 30 x 20, plastered in and 
outside. A new storehouse, 30 x 20, with floor upstairs, plastered outside. Also a hen 
house, 12 X 12. All the buildings in the barracks Were freshly plastered. Two lime 
kilns were built and sufficient lime burned to more than do all the police buildings on 
the trail. 

Wells Detachment. Stable, 12 x 24. Tent with frame and floor, 16x18. A 
fish house, 12 x 16, under course of erection. 

Dalton House. All the roofs were recovered with earth and new ridge poles put 
on store house. 

The stopping places at Rainy Hollow, Glacier Camp and Bear Camp, were all over- 
hauled, roofs taken off, new ridge poles and earth put on, also plastered in and out. 

On the afternoon of the 30th October, at 2.50 p.m., I received your orders to report 
at White Horse on transfer to ' B ' Division, Dawson. I handed over stores, made out 
boards as directed, and proceeded on the 2nd inst. to the Wells Detachment accompanied 
by Asst. Surgeon Fraser, and handed over that place to him on the 3rd. My orders sent 
down to Wells to secure canoes on the 31st ultimo I found had not materialized, and it 
was not until the 5th instant that I finally got away. Our passage down the river was 
through floating ice. Eleven miles up from Jones' Point our passage was arrested by 
field ice, the floating cakes having backed up at tide water and frozen. After consider- 
able difficulty in cutting our way through the ice into the shore, we unloaded our canoes 
and walked to Murphy's Flats, where we procured a team from Mr. Dalton and hauled 
our baggage to the Flats. The scow which was to convey us across the Chilcat Bay was 
down at Pyramid Harbour, and owing to the blinding snowstorm of the 6th it was 
impossible to get the scow to where it could be loaded. On the 7th we loaded up and 
made Jones' Point, arriving at Haines at noon. As we were unable to get a team until 
late in the afternoon, we were too late to catch the packet going to Skagway on the 7th. 
I arrived at White Horse at 4.30 p.m. of the 11th instant, where I reported to you. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

A. M. JARVIS, Inspector, 
Commanding Dalton Trail Detachments. 



REPORT OF ASSISTANT SURGEON FARE 73 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



APPENDIX D. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF ASSISTANT SURGEON L. A. PARE, WHITE 

HORSE. 

North-west Mounted Police, White Horse, Y.T., Nov. 10, 1901. 

The Officer Commanding, 

' H ' Division, N. W. M. P., 
White Horse, Y.T. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following as my annual medical report for 
the year 1901. 

The general health of the division has been good throughout the year. 

The case of small-pox which occurred just at the time of writing last year's report 
terminated favourably, and no other case originated from it. The strictest measures of 
isolation and disinfection were carried out from the very first. All articles likely to 
carry infection were burnt. Every one of the men have now been vaccinated and re- 
vaccinated. 

I am happy to say that we have no deaths to record in the division this year, in 
fact we have had none from disease these last three years, the only ones being the two 
by drowning already reported on last year. 

I am also much pleased to be able to record the total absence of infectious diseases, 
or continued fever amongst our men. The only case of fever we had was one of typho- 
pneumonia, that of an aged p;-isoner, whose death I have to record here. The old man 
was in a very despondent state of mind, from the first he was haunted with the fear of 
dying a prisoner, was daily harping on this, and protesting his innocence. This depressed 
feeling no doubt greatly diminished his chances of recovery. 

There were a great number of cases of measles in town ; it first broke out amongst 
the Indians. Stringent measures of isolation were adopted as soon as the police author- 
ities heard of it. All the Indians around town were ordered across the river, quarantined 
and treated there. I have sent in a report concerning this outbreak. None of our men 
were aflPected by this disease, neither did any of them suffer from mumps, of which there 
were several cases among the shipbuilders and others in town. This immunity from 
this class of disease speaks well for the physical and the constitutional fitness of our 
men and the sanitary conditions surrounding them ; and I must say that the weekly 
inspection gives evidence of careful supervision as to the cleanliness of rooms, disposal 
of garbage, and the intelligent distribution of disinfectants. 

There were 270 cases treated during the year, 241 were policemen and twenty-nine 
prisoners. Attendance and medicine were also given to quite a few Indians. We had 
very few cases of a serious nature amongst our men, and quite a few cases resulted from 
accidents. Two were from gunshot wounds; one that of Reg. No. 3435, Constable 
Kramer, was a wound through the fleshy part about th3 knee ; no permanent disability 
will result from it, he is now perfectly recovered and is doing duty. The other gun 
accident is, unfortunately, of a more serious nature, the victim, Reg. No. 3513, Constable 
Farquharson, lost his right arm, which had to be amputated a few inches from the 
shoulder ; he is still under treatment, and to all appearance he will make a good recovery. 
Constable Robb has also come from detachment with a fractured leg. While out walk- 
ing he slipped on some ice, fell, and broke the tibia of the left leg in the lower third. 
He is also under treatment. No permanent disability is anticipated. 



74 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

I would beg to reiterate my recommendations re rations and water supply made in 
my last two annual reports. I particularly regret that my suggestions re the water 
supply have not been acted upon, for, I believe, with a very small outlay the best possible 
water could be procured. By the erection of a large tank on the hill just close to the 
barracks an abundant supply of an ideal drinking water would be secured, and as fire 
protection it would also afford much security, for the difference of level would give a 
very high pressure. The cost of the tank itself would be merely nominal. There are 
logs in quantity close by, and it could be built by our own labour ; the only cost to speak 
of would be that of the piping, and then the distance is so short ; so much for the con- 
siderations of economy, but from the all-important sanitary aspect it would be of incal- 
culable value ; as the main danger is of typhoid fever (to mention onl}^ one), a disease 
which the world over yearly claims so many victims, and which arises mostly from drink- 
ing water, so should the plan I suggest be considered, though for one reason or another 
impracticable during the winter months, I would still strongly urge its adoption during 
the summer months, as it is at that time that the danger from this source is greater, and 
for this the cost would be insignificant 

As to wells, I have repeatedly, at different times and in different reports, expressed 
the opinion that they are always suspicious sources of supply, for it is almost impossible 
to protect them from soakages, overflows, etc. Then there is the danger of things getting 
in, or being thrown in. 

The canteen which, as shown in my last report, proved to be a great boon, still con- 
tinues to be so ; it is no doubt a great factor in keeping the men to the proper standard 
of health, by affording them the chance of procuring fruits, etc., which in this country 
are so desirable, and needful a change of diet, which, without the canteen, owing to the 
prevailing prices here and to the small pay, would be quite out of reach of our men. 

The practice recently adopted of employing men who have a fair knowledge of cook- 
ing instead of having the constables do the cooking in turn as part of their duties, has 
also been of great benefit from a health point of view ; there are not by far the same 
amount of gastric disturbances as there used to be, and I feel sure that there is also a 
great improvement from an economical standpoint. 

Our drug supply has been very satisfactory, and reached us in good time and in very 
good order, in spite of the immense distance it has to come. 

Reg. No. 3186, Sergt. Lee, has received a well merited promotion. He still deserves 
great praise for the thoroughness and great zeal with which he discharges his duties. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

L. A. PARE, 

Assistant Surgeon, 



REPORT OF ASSISTANT SURGEON PARE 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Annual Sick Report of ' H ' Division, for the Year ending November 10, 1901. 



75 



Disease. 



Adenitis, Inpruinal 

It Axillery 

Albuminuaria.. . 

Burns 

Bealing fingers 

Bronchitis 

Cephalalgia 

Colds and C-oughs 

Contusions 

Cuts 

Cellulitis 

Conjunctivitis 

Chafes .... 

Chancres 

Corns 

Dislocations 

Diarrhoea 

Dog bites 

Eczema , 

Functional disturbance. 

Felon. 

Frostbites 

Fracture (Tibia) 

Gingivitis 

Gunshot wounds 

Icterus 

Influenza . . 

Ingrowing toenail 

Lumbago 

Lacerated feet 

Neuralgia 

Otitis 

Phimosis 

Punctured wounds 

Rheumatism 

Sprains and strains 

Tonsilitis 

Typho- Pneumonia 

Taenia 

Ulcers 

Urethritis (specific) .... 

Venereal sores 

Vaccination 

Varicose veins 



No. of police cases. . 
It prisoners. . . 



Total, 



Number 

of 
Cases. 



2 

1 

1 

2 

3 

1 

5 

51 

18 

10 

14 

3 



1 
1 

1 
1 
2 

44 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
1 

15 
1 
2 
1 
8 
2 
1 
2 

11 

19 
1 
1 
1 
2 
8 
1 

19 
1 



.Numoer | ^^^^^^ 
Days. |I>«^^ation. 



241 
29 



270 



181 

21 

8 

2 

15 

2 

5 

109 

72 

48 

67 

6 

3 

4 

1 

11 

2 

1 

2 

88 

1 

24 

13 

2 

47 

11 

62 

4 

6 

5 

62 

5 

1 

5 

56 

64 

1 

16 

5 

3 

125 

8 

19 



Days. 

90* 
21" 
8 
1 
5 
2 

i 

4 

2 
1 

11 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
8 

13 
2 

23^ 

11 

4 
3 
5 

7 

1 

% 

1 

16 
5 

151 

8 
1 
9 



Surgeon's Remarks. 



Recovered and returned to duty. 
Prisoner recovered and returned to work. 
Recovered and returned to duty. 



3 prisoners 
1 ,. 
1 „ 
Recovered 



2 prisoners 
Recovered 

II 
Prisoner 
Recovered 
1 prisoner 
4 
Recovered 



work, 
duty. 

It 
work, 
duty. 



Still under treatment. 
Recovered and returned to duty. 
One, arm amputated ; still in hospital. 
Recovered and returned to duty. 
2 prisoners tt n 

Recovered n n 

1 prisoner n n 

Recovered n m 

II »i II 

1 prisoner n n 
[Recovered n n 

1 2 prisoners n m 

2 II II It 
! Recovered n n 
[Prisoner Sullivan died. 
Recovered and returned to duty. 
2 prisoners n work 

1 .1 I. duty. 
Recovered n u 

2 prisoners n u 
Prisoner still under treatment. 



L. A. PARE. 

Assistant Surgeon. 



76 NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



APPENDIX E. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF ASSISTANT SURGEON S. M. ERASER, DALTON 

TRAIL. 

North-west Mounted Police, 

Dalton Trail Detachment, 

November 1, 1901. 
The Oificer Commanding, 

' H ' Division, White Horse, Y.T. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the annual medical report of this detachment 
for the past year. 

The health of all the members of the detachment on this trail has been very good. 
I am glad to say that I have had no serious cases. 

. When cases of small-pox were reported at Chilkat, Haines and Pyramid Harbour 
in May last I had all the members of the Dalton Trail detachments vaccinated. A 
quarantine was established against all parties entering British territory by this trail, 
who were not successfully vaccinated — those requiring same were vaccinated by me. 
The suspected case of small-pox among the Indians at Kluchwan was visited by me and 
found not to be as rumored. No medical supplies were received during the past year, 
and the supply is about exhausted. I am requisitioning for a further supply. A few 
cases from the interior were treated at tliis post of white men who arrived here ; one 
man was picked up by the Five Fingers patrol in an emaciated and nearly starved con- 
dition, being unable to walk. A number of Indians were also treated for different 
ailments. 

Attached is an appendix of diseases and cases treated during the year. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

S. M. FRASER, 

Assistant Surgeon. 



REPORT OF ASSISTANT SURGEON ERASER 71 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

Annual Sick Report of Dal ton Trail Post Detachment, for Year ending October, 1901. 



Disease, 



Boils 

Biliousness 

Cold, bronchia. 
Conjunctivitis. 
Constipation . . 
Gonorrhea 



Rheumatism 

Cut on foot 

Cut on thigh 

Cut on head 

Contusion hand 

Enlarged glands, both groins. 
.. right groin.. 

Wound hand, incised 

Tumor on back 



Toothache 

Synovitis, knee. 



Number 

of 
Cases. 



Number 

of 

Dayis. 



3 
1 
4 
3 
1 
18 

5 
8 

41 
2 
1 

64 

10 
5 

29 

1 
16 



Average 
Duration . 



Remarks. 



3 
1 
2 
3 

1 
6 

5 
4 

41 
2 
1 

64 

10 
5 

29 

1 
16 



Recovered. 



1 left for division headquarters iinder 

treatment. 
Recovered. 



Left for division headquarters under 

treatment. 
Recovered. 



S. M. FRASER, 

Assistant Surgeon. 



28— U 



78 NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE 

. 1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



APPENDIX F. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF ASSISTANT SURGEON, W. E. THOMPSON, DAWSON. 

North-west Mounted Police, Dawson, Y.T., November 30, 1901. 

The Officer Commanding, 

' E ' Division, N. W. M. Police, 

Dawson, Y.T. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report of this Division for 
the past year. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

W. E. THOMPSON, 

Assistant Surgeon. 



HEALTH OF DIVISION. 

Compared with the previous year, the general health of the division has been 
better ; 211 cases were treated during the year. Of these, 44 were of a severe type, 
the remainder were of simple and mild form. 

PNEUMONIA. 

During the months of December, 1900, and January and February, 1901, the weather 
was very trying ; a dense fog hanging around the town, gave rise to a sharp epidemic 
of pneumonia. Many cases proved fatal in the general hospitals. Five cases occurred 
in the barracks, and I am glad to say, that although three were very severe, all re- 
covered and were returned to duty. 

SPECIAL CASES. 

On January 6, Reg. No. 1260, Const. H. G. Joyce was stricken with paralysis. 
The first attack partly passed off, but a second and more severe attack followed in a few 
days and the patient had almost complete parah^sis of the right side, and the power of 
speech totally destroyed. The conditions remained for twenty-seven days, when the 
patient showed signs of recovery, power of speech slowly returning, and by the end of 
March he was able to walk about and talk fairly well. He was transferred to Regina 
on June 6, 1901. 

Two cases of heart disease were treated during the year, viz : Reg. No. 3374, 
Const, de Chaumont and Reg. No. 3625, Const. Clem. Const, de Chaumont was ad- 
mitted to hospital on December 6, his ailment which ran a normal course and the patient 
was about to be discharged, when he had a serious attack of heart failure which kept 
him in hospital until March 26. He was transferred to Regina in October. In the 
other case (Const. Clem), it followed an attack of typhoid but the patient completely 
recovered and was returned to duty. 



REPORT OF ASSISTANT SURGEON THOMPSON 79 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 

TYPHOID. 

Two cases of typhoid occurred during the year, viz : Reg. JSTo. 3625, Const. Clem 
and Reg. No 342.5, Const. Kramer. The former was admitted to hospital on July 6, 
but the case proved to be a mild one. Const. Kramer was admitted on September 6, 
and this was also a mild case, he being returned to duty in October. 

INVALIDS. 

The following non-commissioned officers and constables were transferred to Regina, 
N.W.T., on the medical officers' recommendation : — 

Reg. No. 301.— Staff-Sergt. Keenan, H., debility. 

Reg. No. 2979.— Const. Rawson, C. H., debility. 

Reg. No. 3461. — Const. Schrieber, debility. 

Reg. No. 2372. — Const. Kembry, S. J., niphritis 

Reg. No. 2762. — Const. deLorimier, J. C, bad chest. 

Reg. No. 3316.— Const. Mollier, P. P. P., hernia 

Reg. No. 3374.— Const. Tyrrell, W., injured foot. 

Most of these men went out in charge of lunatics to the New Westminister 
Asylum. 

OFFICERS. 

The health of the officers of the Division has, for the past year, been very good 
considering the long arduous trips made on inspections, &c. 

There were onh^ two caes of severe illness, viz : — Supt. Wood (O.C.Y.T.) was 
seized with a sharp attack of pneumonia on December 11, 1900, from which he made 
a good recovery and was returned to duty on January 7, 1901. 

Inspector Starnes was on November 30 taken very ill of brain fever and after 
remaining in a serious condition for some days recovered and was returned to duty on 
December 25. 

HOSPITAL. 

The hospital is now well stocked with drugs and appliances, the new stock arrived 
shortly before the close of navigation. 

The hospital is warm and comfortable, but altogether inadequate for our require- 
ments. At present we have two wards, a dispensary and small kitchen. When a case 
requiring isolation is admitted it cuts off one ward, leaving a solitary ward for all other 
patients, and the very small kitchen has to answer as a dining room as well. The 
absence of a bath room is a serious inconvenience, not having a private ward we would 
have to adopt temporary and very indifferent accomodation for an officer. 

Convicts and common jail prisoners have to be put into wards with our own men, 
and to admit a female prisoner would be simply impossible. 

A dining room, bath room, store room and a couple of private wards are urgently 
needed to meet the demands of this division, and I recommend that they be added next 
season. 

PRISON AND PENITENTIARY. 

There has been an average of six prisoners on the daily sick report during the 
year. 

One case of sudden death occurred in the gaol ; a casual prisoner complained of 
being unwell and before the physician could reach the gaol to render assistance he pas- 
sed away of heart disease. 

LUNATICS. 

During the year 1 9 lunatics were confined in the asylum ; of these 8 were discharged, 
10 sent out to New Westminster and one is at present under confinement. 

A small building has been fitted up in the barracks inclosure to accommodate 
lunatics brought in during the winter. 



80 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
BARRACKS. 



The barracks have been regularly inspected each week and are in a good sanitary 
condition. 

A list of cases treated during the year is herewith appended : — 

List of Cases Treated during the Year, ' B ' Division Hospital. 



Disease. 



Aphonia 

Anaemia 

Abcess 

II dental 
Auritis.. .... 

Biliousness . . 
Boils 



Bubo 

Colds, severe. . 
M slight... 

Catarrh 

Colic 

Cramps 

Diarrhoea 

Dyspepsia 

Dysentery 

Debility. 

Exhaustion. . . . 
Fractured ribs. 
Gastrodynia . . . 
Gonorrhoea .... 

Gastritis 

Hernia 

Heart disease. . 

Headache 

Insomnia 

Indigestion. . 

Iritis 

Icterus 

Lumbago 

Nephritis 

Neuralgia.. . . . . 

Neurasthenia.. . 

Orthitis 

Paralj^sis 

Pneumonia . . 

Sprains 

Synovitis 

Sore eyes 

Sore feet 

Sciatica 

Stricture 

Syncope 

Tonsilitis 

Toothache. ... 

Typhoid 

Vaccination . . . 
Wounds, scalp. 



Number 
of 



Whitlow 



face, 
contused . . 
punctured . 
dog bites. 



Number 

of 

Days. 



Total. 



1 
1 
1 
4 
1 

16 
1 
2 

26 

36 
3 
1 
1 
5 
1 
1 
7 
1 
1 
3 

13 
2 
1 
2 
4 
1 
2 
1 
2 
6 

10 
2 
1 
6 
1 
5 

12 
1 
1 
6 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
2 
3 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 

211 



/ 

7 

3 

3 

4 

17 

4 

40 

88 

36 

9 

6 

3 

5 

1 

1 

104 

7 

21 

17 

128 

6 

90 

180 

4 

3 

2 

7 

27 

26 

50 

2 

20 

98 

185 

150 

67 

29 

1 

46 

3 

3 

2 

11 

9 

60 

12 

6 

6 

21 

7 

8 

7 



Average 
Duration . 



Remarks. 



7 
7 
3 
1 
4 
1 
4 

30 
4 
1 
3 
6 
3 
1 
1 
1 

15 
7 

21 
(> 

10 
3 

90 

90 
1 
3 
2 
7 

13 
4 
5 
2 

20 

16 
185 

30 
5 

29 
1 
8 
3 
3 
2 

11 
3 

30 
4 
6 
6 
7 
7 
4 
7 



Recovered and returned to duty. 



I One in hospital. 

\ Recovered and returned to duty . 



Three transferred to N.W.T. 
Recovered and returned to duty. 



! Transferred to N.W.T. 
One transferred to N.W^.T. 
Recovered and returned to duty . 



One transferred. 

Recovered. 

Recovered and returned to duty . 

Transferred to N.W.T. 
Recovered and returned to duty. 



BEPORT OF ASSISTANT SURGEON M ADORE 81 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 28 



ArPENDIX G. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF ASSISTANT SURGEON G. M ADORE, SELKIRK. 

FoKT Selkirk, Yukon Territory, November, 190L 
To the Officer Commanding 

'B' Division, North-west Mounted PoHce, 
Dawson, Yukon Territory. 

Sir,— I have the honour to send you my annual sick report, for this district, for 
the year ending this month of November, 190L 

The health of the members of the force of this district, on the whole, has been good. 
In reviewing the monthly sick report, I find that the majority of cases were : colds, 
bronchitis, pharingitis, biliousness and rheumatic pains. 

Some cases were quite interesting. I attended, during many weeks, for cardiac 
adynamia," Reg. No. 3193, Constable Dempster, of Half- Way Post. I am glad to say 
that his recovery was fully satisfactory. 

Reg. No. 3353, Constable Gernon, of Hoot-chi-koo, was oft* duty, for two weeks, (m 
account of frost bitten toes. But he rapidly and completely recovered, without any 
amputation. 

Constable Kramer, of Five Fingei's, accidentally shot himself, in the inner side of 
the right knee, I attended him for a few days, but, as it was far from easy to treat him 
properly there, and as he belonged to ' H ' Division, he was sent to the hospital, at 
White Horse. 

I attended two prisoners and two destitutes, as also many Indians. 

I vaccinated seven constables, thirtj^-three civilians and sixty Indians. 

I am very happy to state that no deaths occurred, during the year, in my district 

I inclose, hei-ewith, an appendix of cases treated in this district, during the year. 

I have the honour, to be, sir, 

• Your obedient servant, 

G. MADORE, 

Assistant Surgeon. 



82 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Annual Sick Report of Assistant Surgeon G. Madore, Fort Selkirk, Yukon Territory, 

November, 1901. 



Disease. 



Abcess, finger 

Biliousness (1 destitute) 

Bites, dog 

Bronchitis 

Cardiac adynamia 

Chafed hands 

Colds.. 

Constipation 

Dysentery {a prisoner).. 

Frostbites, face 

M toes 

(xlandular abcess, neck 

Gastric disturbance 

Gastrodynia 

Muscular rheumatism (a destitute) 

Neuralgia 

Pharyngitis — 

Rheumatic pains, in legs and knees 

(one prisoner) 

Sore finger . . 

•Sore toe 

Sprains, strains 

Swollen glands ... 

Tonsillitis 

Wounds, fire-arm 



Number 
of 



Number 

of 

Davs. 



6 

26 

45 

5 

30 

10 

2 

6 

15 

16 

4 

2 

3 

5 

12 

9 

8 

5 
10 
12 



Average 
Duration. 



4 

n 

6 

6 
45 

5 

3 

3J 

2 

6 
15 

8 

14 

1 

3 

2i 



Remarks. 



Recovered and returned to duty, 



Med. and light duty. 

Med. and duty. 

Recovered and returned to duty 



Recovered. 

Recovered and returned to duty. 



Was under treatment when pa- 
tient left. 
Recovered and returned to duty. 



A few days later the patient went 
to hospital at White Horse. 



G. MADORE, 

Assistant Surgeon. 



1-2 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 



A. 1902 



REPORT 



SECEETAET OF STATE 



CANADA 



YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 



1901 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 
PRINTED BY S. E. DAWSON, PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST 
EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1902 

No. 29—1902.] 



1-2 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 A. 1902 



INDEX 



Page. 

Canada Temperance Act. Elections under 67 

Commissions to Public Officers 30 

II Tariff of fees upon 71 

Commons. Returns to Addresses and orders of 53 

Companies Act. Tariff of fees on letters patent under 67 

M incorporated under "The Companies Act" 5 

II to which sup))lementary letters patent were issued 5 

II Loan, regulations and tariff of fees on. letters patent to 69 

Consular appointments for Canada in 1901 40 

Deputy Registrar General. Report of 3 

Licenses to British and Foreign Companies to mine in Yukon and X.W.T 33 

Tariff of Fees upon OS 

Officers, clerks and servants of department 72 

Passports issued in 1901 61 

11 regulations concerning 62 

Records. Report of keeper of 60 

Revenue of department 2 

Secretary of State. Report 1 

Senate. Returns to addresses and orders of 52 



1-2 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 A. 1902 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SECEETAKT OF STATE 

OF C^ISTA-DA. 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1901. 



To His Excellency the Right Honourable Sir Gilbert John Ellioty Earl oj MintOy 
* G.C.M.G.^ dhc, d&c, dtc, Governor General of Canada. 

My Lord, — I have the honour to lay before Your Excellency a statement showing 
the operations of the Department of the Secretary of State for the year ended Decem- 
ber 31, 1901. 

Accompanying this report are the following appendices : — 

A. Report of the Deputy Registrar General of Canada, comprising a summary of 
the work done in the Registry branch of my department ; a list of commissions issued 
to public officers ; a statement showing the companies incorporated by letters patent 
under The Companies Act during the year, with the powers, capital stock, &c., of 
each company, and a similar statement showing the British and foreign companies 
licensed under the Act 61 Vic, chap. 49, to carry on mining operations in the Yukon 
and North-west Territories. 

B. Lists of all consular appointments in the Dominion, according to the latest 
information supplied to the Secretary of State, showing in the first list the names of all 
the appointees alphabetically arranged, with the countries represented by them, and in 
the second, similarly arranged, the countries represented, followed by the names of the 
consular officers, the year of appointment being given in both cases. 

C. Schedules of returns to addresses and orders passed by the Senate and House^ 
of Commons of Canada during the ses?ion of 1901, received and prepared by the 
department and presented through the Secretary of State. 

D. Summary report of the work done in the Records branch of my department. 

E. List of persons to whom passports have been issued during the year. 

At the end of this appendix will be found the regulations governing the issue of 
passports, and also the passport requirements of foreign 30untries. 

F. Election undei the Canada Temperance Act during the year. 
29—1 



2 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

G. Tariff of fees payable upon applications for letters patent incorporating com- 
panies under chapter 119, R.S.C. (The Companies Act). 

H. Tariff of fees payable upon applications for licenses to British and foreign com- 
panies or corporations to carry on mining operations in the Yukon and North-west 
Territories. 

I. Regulations and tariff of fees payable upon applications for letters patent under 
the Act respecting Loan Companies. 

J. Tariff of fees payable upon commissions to public officers. 

K. List of the officers, clerks and servants of the department, with date of appoint- 
ment, rank and salary in each case. 

The report of the Board of Civil Service Examiners for the year 1901, required by 
ection 58 of the Civil Service Act, has been prepared, and will be submitted as a 
separate report. 

The Civil Service List of Canada for the year 1901, showing the names, dates of 
appointments and promotions, ages and salaries of all persons employed in the several 
departments of the service and in the two Houses of Parliament, as the same stood 
upon the 1st July last, has been published and distributed. 

The following is a statement of the fees received during the financial year ended 
June 30, 1901 :— 

Charters and supplementary charters $ 9,250 00 

Licenses 2,450 00 

Commissions 777 00 

Passports 444 00 

Certified copies 869 31 

Certificates of incorporation 82 50 

Certificates of deposit 43 50 

Exemplifications 20 00 

Certificates of legalization 36 00 

Copies 74 50 

Searches 47 65 

Sundry certificates, &c 1 1 1 00 

$14,205 46 

I am pleased to add that the staff of the department ha^ e continued to discharge 
their duties to my entire satisfaction. 

I have the honour to be, 
My Lord, 
Your Excellency's obedient servant, 

R. W. SCOTT, 

Secretary of State. 



1-2 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 



A. 1902 



APPEISTDIX A. 



Department of the Secretary of State of Canada, 

Registrar's Branch, Ottawa, January 2, 1902. 

The Honourable R. W. Scott, K.C, LL.D. 
Secretary of State of Canada. 

Sir, — T have the honour to submit for your information the following statement of 
work performed under my superintendence in this branch of your department during 
the past year, viz., from January 1 to December 31, 1901. 



Condensed Statement showing the work performed in the Registrar's Branch of the 
Department of the Secretary of State from January 1 to December 31, 1901. 



Documents. 



Agreements 

Appointments under Ch. 38 (R.S.C.) 

Board of Trade Certificates . . 

*Bonds 

Cancellations 

Certificates of Expropriation 

Charters 

Commissions 

Exemplifications 

Instructions to Lieut. -Governors < . . . 

Leases (Ferries, Lands, &c.) 

Letters Patent granting annuities . . 

n summoning to Senate 

Licenses 

Notices of additions, &c., to General Bonds. 

Orders in Council 

Pardons 

Powers of Attorney . . . 

Proclamations 

Quit-claims 

Releases, Surrenders, &;c 

Returns (Trade Union) 

Treaties 

Warrants 

Writs of Assistance 

.1 Election 



Land Patents. 



tOrdnance Land Sales . 
Special Grants 



Total 



Engrossed. 



277 



Recorded. 



2 
4 

10 

33 
3 
3 

55 

93 
4 
1 
8 
1 
7 
7 

43 
7 
1 
5 

22 
9 

77 
1 
4 

53 



13 



490 



Total. 



2 

4 

10 

36 

6 

3 

110 

179 

8 

2 

15 

2 

14 

14 

43 

7 

2 

5 

39 

18 

77 

1 

4 

99 

6 

13 



767 



* An annual statutory return of bonds is submitted to parliament under section 23 of chapter 19 
(R.S.C.) giving full particulars of the bonds registered in the branch since last return. 

t Quarterly returns of these lands were sent to the registrar of each city and county in the province of 
Ontario, and to the secretary -treasurer of each city and county in the province of Quebec, in which patents 
were issued, and a copy of the several returns in Ontario was also sent to the provincial secretary of 
Ontario. 

29— U 



4 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

In addition to the foregoing statement there have been copied during the year 1,207 
pages of manuscript, records, &c. 

I also submit the annexed synopsis, with accompanying index, of letters patent, 
issued during the year, to all companies incorporated under chapter 119 of the ' Revised 
Statutes of Canada,' embodying the name of the company, the date of incorporation, the 
amount of capital stock, with the number of shares and amount of each share, the names 
of the corporate members with place of residence, the first or provisional directors of the 
company, the chief place of business, and the objects or purposes for which incorporation 
was granted ; also of all companies which have been granted supplementary letters pat- 
ent during the same period under the said Act, and the purposes for which such sup- 
plementary letters patent were issued. 

A list of companies licensed under 61 Vic, chap. 49, to carry on mining operations 
with the privileges of a free miner within the Yukon and North-west Territories of 
Canada is also included herein. 

A list of public officers to whom commissions have issued during the year under 
chapters 19, 114 and 115 (Revised Statutes of Canada) is also appended hereto. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JOSEPH POPE, 
Deputy- Registrar General of Canada. 



1-2 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 A. 1902 

f 

SYNOPSIS OF LETTERS PATENT 

ISSUED TO 

COMPANIES INCORPORATED 

UNDER 

CHAPTER 119 OF 'THE REVISED STATUTES OF CANADA.' 

KNOWN AS 

' THE COMPANIES ACT' 

"FroiTi Jari-uarjr 1 to DeceinT>er 31, lOOl. 



' THE BRITISH YUKON LAND COMPANY ' (Limited). 

Incorporated December 22, 1900. Amount of capital stock, $25,000. 

Number of shares, 250. — Amount of each share, $100. 

{Jorporate Members : — Samuel H. Graves, gentleman, Chicago, U.S.A.; Francis Henry 
Chrysler, gentleman ; Robert Victor Sinclair, gentleman ; Charles James Rattray 
Bethune, gentleman, and Frank Bertram Proctor, gentleman, all of Ottawa, Ont. 

iHrst or Provisional Directors: — The said corporate members. 

Chief 'place of Business : — City of Ottawa, Ont. 

Objects oj the Company : — (a.) To acquire by purchase, exchange or otherwise, any free- 
hold or leasehold land and any estate or interest therein within Canada, and the 
same to hold, sell, exchange, lease, let or otherwise deal with, or dispose of for cash, 
or upon rentals, or for any other consideration, and to take and hold mortgages 
upon such lands to secure purchase moneys, and the same to assign, sell or other- 
wise deal with, and to excute and deliver mortgages upon any land or interest 
therein which may be acquired as aforesaid ; (6.) Further to erect buildings upon 
or otherwise improve, subdivide, or lay out such lands with streets, lanes and squares 
or otherwise, and to dedicate the same, if so required, to public uses ; the opera- 
tions of the company to be carried on in the Yukon Territory of Canada and else- 
where throughout the Dominion of Canada. 



' THE FLORENCE R. HEWSON COMPANY ' (Limited). 

Incorporated December 29, 1900. - - - Amount of capital stock, $9,600. 

Number of shares, 64. — Amount of each share, $150. 

Corporate Members : — Christopher D. Pickels, merchant ; Albert D. Mills, merchant ; 
Frank W. Pickels, merchant ; Clarence W. Mills, merchant ; John H. Runciman, 
merchant ; Wesley Paterson, master-mariner ; Clarence W. Croscup, master-mari- 



6 DEPAJRTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

ner ; George A. Hardwick, postmaster ; and Ernest A. Mills, clerk, all of Annapo- 
lis Royal, N.S., and Samuel W. W. Pickup, merchant, of Granville Ferry, N.S., 
and Amos Burns, merchant, of Boston, U.S.A. 

First or Provisional Directors : — Christopher D. Pickels, Albert D. Mills, and Frank 
W. Pickels. 

Chief place of Business : — Town of Annapolis, N.S. 

Objects of the Company : — (a.) To acquire, purchase, own, hold, manage, use, employ, 
charter, sell, convey, dispose of or otherwise deal with the three-masted schooner 
•'Florence R. Hewson ;" (6.) To carry on the trade or business of managing, using, 
employing, chartering or otherwise dealing with the said schooner " Florence R. 
Hewson ", and to carry on a-nd in respect of the said schooner the trade or business 
of ship-owner and common carriers by sea, and to do, perform and transact all 
other acts, matters and business incident to the occupation or business of ship- 
owner and common carriers by sea. 



'THE IDA M. SHAFFNER COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated December 29, 1900. - - - Amount of capital stock, $12,800. 

Number of shares, 64. — Amount of each share, $200. 

Corporate Members : — Lawrence Delap Shaffner, ship builder ; and Charles Shaffner, 
merchant, both of Bridgetown, N.S. ; Albert Mailman, master-mariner, of Bridge- 
water, N.S. ; Samuel Walter William Pickup, broker, of Granville Ferry, N.S., 
and Amos Burns, commercial traveller, of Kingston, N.S. 

First or Provisional Directors : — Lawrence Delap Shaffner, Samuel Walter William 
Pickup and Amos Burns. 

Chief place of Business : — Bridgetown, N.S. • 

Objects of the Company : — The building, purchasing, acquiring, selling, hiring, charter- 
ing, employing, owning, navigating, managing and maintaining a vessel called the 
" Ida M, Shaffner" the conveying and carrying on said vessel of goods, wares and 
merchandise, freight and cargoes of all descriptions, as well as passengers and 
other traffic, between such ports in any part of the world as may seem expedient ; 
the buying and selling of and trading in cargoes and merchandise for freight, hire 
and otherwise. 



'THE BROOKSIDE SHIPPING COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated January 3, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, $30,000. 

Number of shares, 300. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — William Leslie Lovitt, ship-owner ; Minnie Louise Lovitt, 
married woman ; Israel Melbourne Lovitt, physician ; Thomas E. Corning, barris- 
ter-at-law, and Lewis Chipman, barrister-at-law, all of Yarmouth, N.S. 

First or Provisional Directors : — William Leslie Lovitt, Israel Melbourne Lovitt and 
Lewis Chipman. 

Chief place of Business : — Town of Yai mouth, N.S. 

Objects of the Company : — The building, purchasing, acquiring, selling, hiring, charter- 
ing, employing, owning, navigating, managing and maintaining sailing vessels, 
steamships, and all other kinds of craft; the conveying and carrying goods, 



SYNOPSIS OF LETTERS PATENT 7 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

wares, merchandise, freight, and cargoes of all description, as well as passengers, 
mails and other traffic between such ports in any part of the world at may seem 
expedient; the buying and selling of and trading in cargoes and merchandise for 
freight, hire and otherwise, and generally the carrying on the business of ship- 
owning in all its branches. 



'THE DOMINION INDUSTRIAL COMPANY ' (Limited). 

Incorporated January 11, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, $200,000. 
Number of shares, 2,000. — Amount of each share, 



Corporate Members : — Rufus Henry Pope, M. P., William Ward Bailey, manager, both of 
Cookshire, Que. ; George G. Foster, advocate, of Montreal, Que. ; Gardner Stevens, 
trader, of Waterloo, Que., and Francis P. Buck, manager, of Sherbrooke, Que. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief place oj Business : — City of Sherbrooke, Que. 

Objects of the Company: — (a) To carry on the business in all its branches of manufac- 
turing pulp wood, pulp and paper and all business incident thereto, and for such 
purposes to acquire all necessary licenses to cut timber, timber-limits, timber-lands, 
buildings, wharves, dams, piers, mills, millsites, &c., and to alienate the same at 
pleasure ; to cultivate or apply to the purposes of stock raising any portion of the 
lands so acquired suitable for such purposes and not otherwise required ; for the 
purpose of utilizing any timber or material so acquired and not suitable for or not 
required by the company for the manufacture of pulp-wood, pulp or paper, to manu- 
facture lumber, timber, boxes, shingles, doors or such like articles and to sell or 
otherwise dispose of the same, and to establish shops and stores on the said lands 
for the sale of goods, wares and merchandise so far as is necessary to meet the 
requirements of the workmen and employees of the company ; (b) For the purposes 
only of the company, to construct works for the generation, transmission and dis- 
tribution of electric light, heat, power and energy and to acquire and utilize water 
and steam power for the purpose of operating such works or other works, mills or 
machinery of the company ; (c) To acquire the lands, property, privileges, rights, 
contracts, plant, stock-in-trade, good-will, assets and business generally of the part- 
nership known as the Cookshire Mill Company, now carrying on business as mill- 
owners and dealers in pulp-wood and of the individual members of said partnership ; 
to acquire the shares, debentures and securities of other companies similar to this 
company as the consideration for goods, wares or merchandise sold to such similar 
companies in the ordinary course of business. 



'THE C. J. SMITH ESTATE COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated January 26, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, $40,000. 

Number of shares, 400. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members: — Thomas George- Brigham, coal merchant; Eugenia Florence 
ReifFenstein, married woman ; Mary Maud Brigham, spinster ; and James Henry 
Reiffenstein, civil service clerk, all of Ottawa, Ont., and Victoria Rosina Hall, 
married woman, of Montreal, Que. 

First or Provisional Directors : — Thomas George Brigham, Mary Maud Brigham and 
Eugenia Florence Reiffenstein. 



8 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
Chief place of Business : — City of Ottawa, Ont. 

Objects of the Company : — {a) To acquire and hold by lease, purchase or other legal title, 
lands, houses, buildings or premises, and to mortgage, lease, let, sell, convey and 
dispose of the same ; (6) To improve and divide the said lands and construct, erect, 
build and maintain houses, shops, offices, warehouses or other buildings or erections 
thereon, and to alter, pull down, improve and reconstruct the same, and to lease, 
let, sell, convey and dispose of the same ; (c) To advance money to purchasers or 
lessees of the company's land for building purposes or other improvements and to 
take mortgages, hypothecs, liens and charges to secure payment of the purchase 
money of any property sold by the company or of any money due to the company 
from purchasers or advanced by the company to purchasers for building purposes or 
other improvements, and to sell or otherwise dispose of said mortgages, hypothecs, 
liens and charges, and temporarily and pending the obtaining of investments thereof 
in the manner hereinbefore provided for, to invest the surplus funds of the company 
in such approved securities as trustees are usually authorized to invest funds in 
which are entrusted to them. 



'THE WRIGHT TAPER ROLLER BEARING COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated January 31, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, $300,000. 

Number of shares, 3,000. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Memhers : — William Hamilton Wright, manufacturer, of Buffalo, U.S.A. ; 
Alonzo Charles Matthews, gentleman ; William B. Powell, manager ; Robert 
Cooper Smith, advocate ; Charles Ledoux, manufacturer ; Walter Hunter Laurie, 
manufacturer, and Montague Medlen, civil engineer, all of Montreal, Que. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief place of Business : — Montreal, Que. 

Objects oj the Company : — (a.) The manufacture, sale and lease of the bearings known 
as the Wright taper roller bearings ; (b.) The acquiring of all the letters patent of 
the Dominion of Canada granted to William Hamilton Wright for improvements 
in bearings, applicable to railway cars, street railway cars, drays, carriages, bicycles 
and vehicles of all kinds and to shafting, or that may in the future be granted to 
him for any similar purpose ; (c.) The granting of licenses in the Dominion of 
Canada to others to manufacture and use bearings under the said letters patent ; 
(d.) To acquire shares in any company having objects altogether or in part similar 
to those of this company as a consideration for goods, wares or merchandise sold to 
such similar company in the ordinary course of business, or as a consideration for 
the license to manufacture under the letters patent belonging to the ' Wright 
Taper Roller Bearing Company' (Limited); (e.) The manufacture, sale and lease 
of axles, hubs, casings, and whatsoever may in any wise be used in connection with 
the said taper roller bearings ; (/.) The manufacture of and dealing in bearings of 
all kinds that may be used for reducing friction and economizing power. 



' THE BARQUENTINE ANTIGUA COMPANY ' (Limited). 

Incorporated February 7, 1901. - - *- Amount of capital stock, $12,800. 

Number of shares, 64. — Amount of each share, $200. 

Corporate Members : — Henry Harmenus Greeno, ship-owner, of Cheverie, county of 
Hants, N.S. ; and Jedidiah Anthony Binney Shaw, ship-owner ; Thomas Aylward, 
master-mariner ; John Douglas, ship owner, and Samuel Gay Black, gentleman, all 
of Windsor, N.S. 



SYXOPSIS OF LETTERS PATENT 9 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

First or Provisional Directors : — Henry Harmenus Greeno, Thomas Ay] ward and John 
Douglas. 

Chief place of Business : — Town of Windsor, N.S. 

Objects 0/ the Company : — (a.) To acquire, purchase, own, hold, manage, use, employ, 
charter, sell, convey, mortgage, dispose of or otherwise deal with the barquentine 
"Antigua"; {b.) To carry on the trade or business of managing, using, employing, 
chartering, or otherwise dealing with the said barquentine, and to carry on with 
and in respect of the said barquentine the trade or business of a ship-owner and 
common carrier by sea, and to do, perform and transact all other acts, matters and 
business incident to the occupations of ship-owner and common carrier by sea. 



'THE BARQUENTINE TRINIDAD COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated February 7, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, $12,800. 

Number of shares, 64. — Amount of each share, $200. 

Corporate Members : — Henry Harmenus Greeno, ship-owner, of Cheverie, N.S. ; George 
Armstrong, ship-owner, of Summerville, N.S., and Jedidiah Anthony Binney 
Shaw, ship-owner, John Douglas, ship-owner, and Francis Stanley Shaw, clerk, 
all of Windsor, N.S. 

First or Provisional Directors : — Henry Harmenus Greeno, John Douglas and Jedidiah 
Anthony Binney Shaw. 

Chief place oj Business : — Town of Windsor, N.S. 

Objects of the Company : — (a.) To acquire, purchase, own, hold, manaore, use, employ, 
charter, sell, convey, mortgage, dispose of or otherwise deal with the barquentine 
^•Trinidad"; (6.) To carry on the trade or business of managing, using, employing, 
chartering or otherwise dealing with the said barquentine, and to carry on with 
and in respect of the said barquentine the trade or business of a ship-owner and 
common carrier by sea, and to do, perform and transact all other acts, matters 
and business incident to the occupations of ship-owner and common carrier by sea. 



'THE SHIP J. D. EVERETT COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated February 7, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, $25,600. 

Number of shares, 64. — Amount of each share, $400. 

Corporate Memhers: — Henry Harmenus Greeno, ship-owner, of Cheverie, Hants County, 
N.S. ; Jedidiah Anthony Binney Shaw, ship-owner, and Samuel Gay Black, gentle- 
man, both of Windsor, N.S. ; George Armstrong, ship-owner, of Summerville, N.S., 
and William Simpson, blacksmith, of Avondale, N.S. 

First or Provisional Directors : — Henry Harmenus Greeno, Jedidiah Anthony Binney 
Shaw and William Simpson. 

Chief i^lace of Business : — Town of Windsor, N.S. 

Objects of the Company : — {a.) To acquire, purchase, own, hold, manage, use, employ, 
charter, sell, convey, mortgage, dispose of or otherwise deal with the ship " J. D. 
Everett" ; (b.) To carry on the trade or business of managing, using, employing, 
chartering or otherwise dealing with the said ship, and to carry on with and in 
respect of the said ship the trade or business of a ship-owner and common carrier 
by sea, and to do, perform and transact all other acts, matters and business inci- 
dent to the occupations of ship-owner and common carrier by sea. 



10 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
' THE GORHAM COMPANY ' (Limited). 

Incorporated February 16, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, $50,000. 
Number of shares, 500. — Amount of each share. 



Corporate Members : — Edward Holbrook, manufacturer, of Stamford, Conn., U.S.A. ; 
George H. Robinson, manufacturer, of New York, U.S.A. ; and Anthony Haig 
Sims, manufacturer ; William Alexander Grant, gentleman, and George Chillas, 
manufacturers' agent, all of Montreal, Que. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

ChieJ place oj Business : — Montreal, Que. 

Objects of the Company: — (a.)' The manufacture and sale of all kinds of silverware, 
glassware, jewellery and jewellers' supplies and other articles as the directors of 
the company may from time to time deem advisable or expedient ; (6.) Acting as 
agents for other manufacturers and dealers in any of the aforesaid goods or 
articles ; (c.) The acquiring of such patent rights and licenses as may be deemed 
necessary or useful or in any way connected with the business of the company, and 
the selling or otherwise disposing of the same as may be deemed expedient. The 
operations of the company to be carried on at the city of Montreal, in the province 
of Quebec, and elsewhere throughout the Dominion of Canada. 

Supplementary Letters Patent issued February 16, 1901, to 
'THE CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY' (Limited). 

Increasing the capital stock of the said company to the sum of $2,000,000, being an 
, addition of 5,000 shares of common stock of $100 each to the present capital stock ; 

Also extending the powers of the company so as to authorize, permit and allow the said 
company to acquire, by purchase or otherwise, shares in the capital stock, bonds or 
other securities of any other company or corporation manufacturing, producing, 
selling, leasing, holding, using, employing or otherwise dealing in or with any 
property, rights, goods, wares, merchandise, machinery, apparatus, devices or 
materials of any kind used by or in any way required in or relating to the business 
carried on by this company, and to hold, own, buy, pledge or otherwise dispose of 
such shares, and in respect of such shares to exercise all the rights, powers and 
privileges which a holder, being a natural person, might have or exercise. 



Supplementary Letters Patent issued February 19, 1901, to 

' THE CROWDS NEST PASS COAL COMPANY ' (Limited). 

Increasing the capital stock of the said company to the sum of $3,500,000, being an 
addition of 60,000 shares of $25 each to the present capital stock. 



'THE MARGARET MAY RILEY COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated March 1, 1901. ... - Amount of capital stock, $13,952. 

Number of shares, 64. — Amount of each share, $218. 

Corporate Jlfem&ers .—Christopher D. Pickels, merchant; Albert D. Mills, merchant; 
Frank W. Pickels, merchant; and Alfred E. Atlee, druggist, all of Annapolis 
Royal, N.S., and Samuel W. W. Pickup, ship-owner, of Granville Ferry, N.S. 



SYNOPSIS OF LETTERS PATENT U 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

First or Provisional Directors : — Christopher D. Pickels, Samuel W. W. Pickup and 
Albert D. Mills. 

Chief place of Business : — Town of Annapolis Royal, N.S. 

Objects of the Company: — (a.) To acquire, purchase, own, hold, roanage, use, employ, 
charter, sell, convey, mortgage, dispose of or otherwise deal with the three-masted 
schooner "Margaret May Riley;" (b.) To carry on the trade or business of manag- 
ing, using, employing, chartering or otherwise dealing with the said schooner, and 
to carry on with and in respect of the said schooner the trade or business of a ship- 
owner and common carrier by sea, and to do, perform and transact all other acts, 
matters and business incident to the occupation of ship-owner and common carrier 
by sea. 



'THE USHER STEAMSHIP COMPANY ' (Limited). 

Incorporated March 5, 1901. .... Amount of capital stock, $245,000. 

Number of shares, 2,450. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — Hugh Bradford Cann, ship-owner; Charles W. Cann, ship-owner; 
George B. Cann, master-mariner; Augustus Cann, merchant; Charles C. Richards, 
druggist, and John H. Killam, merchant, all of Yarmouth, N.S., and Hugh D. 
Cann, retired master mariner, of Chegoggin, N.S. 

First or Provisional Directors : — Hugh Bradford Cann, Charles W. Cann and George 
B. Cann. 

Chief place of Business: — Chegoggin, N.S. 

Objects of the Company : — The building, constructing, purchasing, acquiring, selling, 
hiring, chartering, employing, owning, navigating, managing, holding, working and 
maintaining steamships and all other vessels ; the conveying and carrying goods^ 
wares, merchandise, freight and cargoes of all descriptions as well as passengers, 
mails and other traffic between such ports in any part of the world as may seem 
expedient ; the buying and selling of and trading in cargoes and merchandise for 
freight, hire and otherwise, and generally the carrying on the business of ship- 
owninj; in all its branches. 



'THE WESTERN CONDENSED MILK, CANNING, COFFEE AND CREAM- 
ERY COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated March 13, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, 84O,U0O. 

Number of shares, 400. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — John H. McKay, physician ; James Dover, gentleman ; George 
W. Stuart, mining engineer; Michael J. O'Brien, contractor, and Charles E. Roop, 
expressman, all of Truro, N.S., and Benjamin C. Wilson, mine-owner, of Waverly, 
N.S. ; and George E. Francklyn, merchant; Alexander A. Hobrecker, merchant; 
the Rev. Francis H. W. Archbold, clergyman; T. Frank Courtney, merchant; 
Thomas Spry, merchant, and George E. Boak, merchant, all of Halifax, N.S., and 
Andrew Stuart Ewing, merchant, of Montreal, Que. 

First or Provisional Directors: — John H. McKay, James Dover, George W. Stuart, 
Benjamin C. Wilson, George E. Francklyn and the Rev. Francis H. W. Archbold. 

ChieJ place of Business : — Mission, B.C. 



2 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Objects of the Company : — To manufacture and can condensed milk, coflfee, co?oa, tea, 
fruits, vegetables, cereals, condiments, confectionery, butter, cheese and evaporated 
cream ; and to buy, sell, export, import and generally deal in milk and any other 
food products in any form, wholesale or retail. 



'THE YUKON TRUST COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated April 4, 1901. - . . . Amount of capital stock, $100,000. 

Number of shares, 2,000. — Amount of each share, $50. 

Corporate Members : — The Hon. L. Joseph Forget, broker ; the Hon. A. Alfred Thibau- 
deau, merchant; Louis de G. Beaubien, merchant, and Tancrede Bienvenu, banker, 
all of Montreal, Que., and the Hon. Louis Beaubien, agriculturist, and Raymond 
Auzias Turenne, minor, both of Outremont, Que. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief jylace of Business : — Montreal, Que. 

Objects of the Company: — {a.) To acquire by purchase, exchange or otherwise any free- 
hold or leasehold land and estate or interest therein within Canada, and the same 
to hold, improve, develop, sell, exchange, lease, let or otherwise deal with or dispose 
of for cash, or upon rentals, or for any other consideration, and to take and hold 
mortgages upon such lands to secure purchase moneys, and the same to assign, 
sell or otherwise deal with, and to execute and deliver mortgages upon the land or 
interest therein which may be acquired as aforesaid ; (b.) And to erect buildings 
or execute all such works upon said lands as are incidental requisite or conducive 
to the attainment of the above objects, and further to act as agents for persons, 
companies and firms doing a similar business ; the operations of the said company 
to be carried on at Dawson City, in the Yukon Territory, and elsewhere through- 
out the Dominion of Canada. 



'THE CANADIAN SALT COMPANY' (Limited). 
Incorporated April 20, 1901. . . . . Amount of capital stock, $800,000. 
Number of shares, 8,000. — Amount of each share. 



€or2)orate Members : — Arthur C. Bissell, bank president, of Buffalo, N.Y., U.S.A., and 
George R. R. Cockburn, bank president, of Toronto, Ont. ; H. Vincent Meredith, 
bank manager ; Richard B. Angus, gentleman, and Sir William C. Van Home, 
K.C.M.G,, railway director, all of Montreal, Que. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief place of Business: — Montreal, Que. 

Objects oj the Company : — The mining, manufacture, purchase and sale of salt in its 
various forms ; the acquisition and sale of patents, properties and rights necessary 
or desirable for any of such purposes. 



SY^'OFSIS OF LETTERS PATENT 13 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

'THE CANADA LINSEED OIL MILLS' (Limited). 

Incorporated May 4, 1901. - . . - Amount of capital stock, $180,000. 

Number of shares, 1,800. — ximount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — Joseph Ovide Gravel, gentleman ; Hugh Montagu Allan, gentle- 
man ; John Baillie, manager ; John J. McGill, manager, and Edward Liersch, 
manager, all of Montreal, Que. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief place of Business : — Montreal, Que. 

Objects of the Company : — (a.) To manufacture linseed and other oils and any other 
articles or materials made therefrom and the by-products thereof ; (6.) To trade in 
such goods, in linseed and other grains and seeds and the products thereof; (c.) 
To acquire the business and assets of any individual dealing in the same materials ; 
{d.) To acquire shares, debentures and securities of other similar companies as the 
consideration for goods, wares or merchandise sold to such similar companies in 
the ordinary course of business, and to alienate the same at pleasure; (e.) To 
acquire any invention capable of being used for the purposes of the company, and 
to acquire letters patent, privileges and concessions of any character granted in 
respect of any such invention or concession, and dispose of the same. 



'THE NORTH AMERICAN MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated May 4, 1901. . _ . - Amount of capital stock, $175,000. 

Number of shares, 1,750. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — Robert A. C. Smith, ship-owner, and David C. Reid, ship-owner, 
both of New York, U.S.A. ; James Gerald Fitzgibbon, accountant, of Toronto, 
Ont. ; and Sir William C. VanHorne, gentleman, and Charles R. Hosmer, gentleman, 
both of Montreal, Que. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief place of Busi^iess: — City of Montreal, Que. 

Objects of the Company: — (a.) The building, purchasing, acquiring, owning, holding, 
chartering, working, selling, leasing, repairing and operating steamships and other 
vessels of all kinds for general transportation purposes, for the carrying or hiring 
of cargoes of all descriptions as well as the conveyance of mails and passengers 
between any port or ports, foreign or British ; {b.) The building, purchasing, 
acquiring, owning, hiring or leasing of wharves, piers, docks, warehouses and office 
premises which may be necessary or useful for the carrying on of the said business 
and the attainment of the objects aforesaid; (c.) The carrying on of the business 
of steamship and forwarding agents and ship-brokers, and also the business of 
warehousemen so far as necessary for the purposes of the business hereinbefore 
mentioned ; (d.) The constructing, owning, leasing and hiring of the necessary 
apparatus for carrying, delivering, discharging and loading cargoes of every 
description. 



14 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
'THE PENNSYLVANIA COAL COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated May 4, 190L - . - - Amount of capital stock, $100,000. 

Number of shares, 1,000. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — William Mitchell, railroad manager, of Drummondville, Que. ; 
David Mitchell, lumber merchant, of Forestdale, Que.; and Joseph Wilson, man- 
ager; Joseph Patrick, merchant ; *and Walter G. Mitchell, clerk, all of Montreal, 
Que. 

First or Provisional Dh'ectors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief 2>lace of Business : — City of Montreal, Que. 

Objects of the Company : — (a.) Fuel merchants, importers of and wholesale and retail 
merchants and manufacturers of all kinds of fuel, lumber and tan bark, and for 
such purposes to own, lease and operate boats, barges, vessels and other convey- 
ances with or without motive power, provided that when such barges, boats, 
vessels and other conveyances are not required in whole or in part for the purposes 
of the company hereinbefore mentioned they may be employed in the transporta- 
tion for others of goods, wares or merchandise of any kind ; (b.) To purchase and 
acquire as a going concern the assets and assume the liabilities of The Wilson 
Company, a company incorporated under letters patent of the province of Quebec. 



'THE CANADIAN BRONZE COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated May 13, 1901. . . . . Amount of capital stock, $75,000. 

Number of shares, 750. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — Lucius Edward_ Tate, banker ; James Sutherland Robertson 
solicitor; and Mary Eleaner Robertson, married woman ; all of St. Thomas, Ont. 
W^innif red Higginson, spinster ; of L'Orignal. Ont., and Bertram M. Tate, account 
ant ; of Buffalo, N.Y., U.S.A. 

First or Provisional Directors : — Lucius Edward Tate, Bertram M. Tate and James 
Sutherland Robertson. 

Chief place of Business :— Montreal, Que. 

Objects of the Company : — To manufacture, buy and sell on commission or otherwise, 
and deal or trade in bronze or brass castings of any and all descriptions, metal 
alloys, copper, tin, lead and other metals ; to engage in smelting or refining any or 
all of the said metals and alloys, and to manufacture, buy and sell on commission 
or otherwise, and to deal and trade in general foundry supplies ; the operations of 
the company to be carried on at the city of Montreal, in the province of Quebec, 
and elsewhere throughout the Dominion of Canada. 



'THE JOHN BERTRAM AND SONS COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated May 13, 1901. - - - - Amount of capital stock, $300,0()0. 

Number of shares, 3,000. — Amount of each share, $100 

Corporate Members : — John Bertram, manufacturer ; Alexander Bertram, manufacturer ; 
Henry Bertram, manufacturer ; James Bennett Bertram, designer ; and Thomas 
Aimers Bertram, physician ; all of Dundas, Ont. 



SYNOPSIS OF LETTERS PATENT 15 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief place of Business : — Town of Dundas, Ont. 

Objects oj the Company : — To manufacture, buy, sell and deal in machine tools, machin- 
ery, and pulp and paper machinery, the machinery used in the company's work- 
shops to be operated by steam, water or electric power ; the operations of the com- 
pany to be carried on at the town of Dundas, in the province of Ontario, and 
elsewhere throucjhout the Dominion of Canada. 



Supplementary Letters Patent issued May 27, 1901, to 

'THE LAKESIDE NAVIGATION COMPANY' (Limited). 

Increasing the capital stock of the said company to the sum of $100,000, being an addi- 
tion of 2,800 shares of $25 each to the present capital stock ; and changing the 
name of the said company to that of 

-THE NIAGARA, ST. CATHARINES AND TORONTO NAVIGATION COM- 
PANY' (Limited). 



'THE SARNIA BAY TOWING AND SALVAGE COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated June 14, 1901. . . - . Amount of capital stock, $15,000. 

Number of shares, 1,500. — Amount of each share, $10. 

Corporate Members : — Edmund Hall, lumberman ; William Howard Strong, merchant ; 
and Edmund Hall Chaney, accountant ; all of Detroit, U.S.A.; and Horace 
Morey, saw-mill manager ; David MacKenzie, solicitor ; Frederick Forsyth Pardee, 
solicitor ; and David Milne, hardware merchant ; all of Sarnia, Ont. 

First or Provisional Directors : — Edmund Hall, William Howard Strong, David Mac- 
Kenzie, Frederick Forsyth Pardee and David Milne. 

Chief place of Business : — Town of Sarnia, Ont. 

Objects of the Company : — (a.) To construct, purchase, acquire, charter, employ, own, 
manage, maintain and navigate steam or sailing vessels or other kinds of craft for 
the purpose of carrying and conveying passengers, goods, freight, mails or other 
traffic upon and over any of the navigable waters within or bordering upon the 
Dominion of Canada, to and from any port or ports therein, calling at any inter- 
mediate port or ports, and to and from any Canadian port to and from any port in 
the United States of America; (b.) Also to construct, purchase, acquire, charter, 
employ, own, manage, maintain and navigate steam or sailing vessels or other kinds 
of craft, lighters, floats, steam pumps, engines, hoists, twists, cranes, diving appar- 
atus, plant, machinery and appurtenances necessary for the efficient performance 
of wrecking and salvage services upon any of the navigable waters within or bor- 
dering upon the Dominion of Canada; (c.) Also to employ the company's steam 
vessels in towing vessels, timber, logs and cargoes in and upon the navigable 
waters within or bordering upon the Dominion of Canada between the ports 
aforesaid ; (d.) Also to charter from time to time the company's vessels or any of 
them and to let the company's property or any of it for any or all of the purposes 
aforesaid. 



16 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
'ONTARIO POWDER COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated June 20, 1901. - - - - Amount of capital stock, '$100,000. 

Number of shares, 1,000. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — Daniel Smith, manufacturer ; Colin Angus Macpherson, manufac- 
turer, and Francis King, barrister-ac-law, all of Kingston, Ont. ; and Hugh Mac- 
pherson, agent, of Nelson, B.C., and Fred. Hall Hooper, machinist, of Brownsburg^ 
Que. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief place oj Business : — City of Kingston, Ont. 

Objects of the Company : — {a.) To acquire and take over the business of manufacturing 
and selling explosives carried on under the name and firm of Ontario Powder 
Works by two of the petitioners, Daniel Smith and Colin Angus Macpherson, 
above named, and to carry on the said business in all its branches and to extend 
the same; (6.) To manufacture, sell, buy and deal in gun and blastirg powder, 
dynamite, nitro-glycerine, electric blasting apparatus, fuses, detonators and all or 
any other explosives, and all machinery, apparatus, appliances, chemicals and con- 
stituents required either in the production or use thereof; (c.) For the above pur- 
poses to acquire, hold, improve, lease, sell and dispose of factories, warehouses, 
stores, offices, wharves, cables, water powers, easements or other property of whatso- 
ever nature, and to construct, erect and maintain any buildings, erections and 
equipments that may be necessary or useful for the purposes of such business ; (o?.) 
To acquire or dispose of by purchase, lease or otherwise devices, systems, formula?, 
trade marks, processes or inventions affecting such machinery, apparatus, appli- 
ances or products, or to so acquire or so dispose of patent rights or patents in any 
way relating to the same; (e.) To acquire shares, stock, bonds or other securities 
of other companies having objects wholly or in part similar to those of this com- 
pany as the consideration for goods, wares or merchandise sold to such other com- 
pany in the ordinary course of business, and to alienate the same at pleasure ; the 
operations of the company to be carried on at the city of Kingston, in the pro- 
vince of Ontario, and elsewhere throughout the Dominion of Canada. 



'THE COLCHESTER STEAMSHIP COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated June 25, 1901. - - - - Amount of capital stock, $80,000. 

Number of shares, 800. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — Martin Dickie, bank manager ; Cecilia Dickie, spinster ; and 
Hugh MacKenzie, solicitor, all of Truro, N.S. ; and Alfred Dickie, manufacturer, 
of Stewiacke, N.S., and Hector McTnnes, solicitor, of Halifax, N.S. 

First or Provisional Directors : — Martin Dickie, Cecilia Dickie, Hugh MacKenzie and 
Hector Mclnnes. 

Chief place of Business : — Town of Truro, N.S. 

Objects oj the Company: — (a.) The building, purchasing, acquiring, owning, holding, 
chartering, working, selling, leasing, repairing and operating steamships and other 
vessels of all kinds for general transportation purposes, including the carrying for 
hire of coal, minerals, lumber, merchandise and cargoes of all descriptions, as well 
as the conveyance of passengers and mails in and between any port or ports in the 
Dominion of Canada, and between such ports and any British and foreign ports ; 
(6.) The building, purchasing, acquiring, owning, hiring or leasing of such wharves, 



SYNOPSIS OF LETTERS PATENT 17 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

piers, docks and warehouses as may be necessary or useful for the carrying on of 
the said business ; (c.) The carrying on of the business of steamship and forward- 
ing agents, ship brokers and warehousemen, but in the case of the last named only 
to the extent necessary for the purpose of the company's business mentioned in 
clause (a) ; the operations of the company to be carried on at Halifax, in the pro- 
vince of Nova Scotia, and elsewhere throughout the Dominion of Canada, and 
between ports in Canada, and between such ports and British and foreign ports. 



'THE CANADIAN YUKON LUMBER COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated June 29, 1901. - - - . Amount of capital stock, $150,000. 

Number of shares, 1,500. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — Richard Wilson-Smith, financial agent ; William Miller Ramsay, 
gentleman ; Thomas George Roddick, doctor of medicine ; Garnet Henry Meldrum, 
broker ; James W. Pyke, agent ; and Frederick Wilson-Smith, agent, all of Mon- 
treal, Que. 

FWst or Provisional Directors : — Richard Wilson-Smith, William Miller Ramsay, 
Thomas George Roddick, Garnet Henry Meldrum and James W. Pyke. 

ChieJ place of Business : — City of Montreal, Que. 

Objects oj the Company : — (a.) To carry on throughout Canada and elsewhere the busi- 
ness of lumberers, timber merchants and manufacturers of timber and lumber in 
all its branches and all other business incidental thereto or connected therewith, 
including the manufacture of furniture, doors, sashes, blinds and any other like 
articles, and also of pulp wood, pulp paper and other products from pulp and from 
wood or wood materials ; (6.) To acquire timber limits, and to purchase, let, lease 
or otherwise acquire any licenses to cut timber, and to acquire such buildings, 
docks, works, boats, vessels, cars and vehicles as are deemed necessary and expe- 
dient for the aforesaid purposes of the company; (c.) To purchase, build, rent or 
otherwise acquire and operate lumber mills, and to buy, sell, deal in and otherwise 
dispose of the products of the said mills in any form ; {d.) So far as deemed neces- 
sary or expedient for the purposes, of the company to construct or aid in and sub- 
scribe towards the construction or acquiring, maintaining and improving of roads, 
docks, piers, wharfs, viaducts, aqueducts, flumes, bridges, ditches, water or other 
hydraulic rights, houses or other buildings, and to construct, own or lease, main- 
tain and operate telegraph and telephone lines ; (c.) To build, acquire, own, 
charter or lease and to navigate and use steamers, boats or other vessels so far as 
necessary or expedient for the conveyance of the products of the company's mills 
or other like purposes of the company; ('/.) To acquire shares, debentures and 
securities of other similar companies as the consideration for goods, wares and 
merchandise or mining properties or rights sold to such similar companies in the 
ordinary course of business. 

Provided that nothing herein contained shall be construed to interfere with 
any private rights or to confer on the said company the right of building bridges, 
piers or works over any navigable river in Canada without the consent of the 
Governor in Council, or of erecting their posts or placing their lines of telegraph 
or telephone upon the line of any railway in Canada without the consent of the 
company or parties to whom such railway belongs. 

Provided also that any message in relation to the administration of justice, 
the arrest of criminals, the discovery or prosecution of crime and Government 
messages or despatches shall always be transmitted in preference to any other 
message or despatch if required by any person connected with the administration 
of justice or any person thereunto authorized by any Minister of Canada. 
29- -2 



18 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
'THE MINAS BASIN STEAMSHIP COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated July 6, 1901. - - - - Amount of capital stock, $25,000. 

Number of shares, 1,000. — Amount of each share, $25. 

Corporate Members : — John Henry Potter, master-mariner ; William Russell Potter, 
mastei -mariner ; Alfred Potter, master-mariner; and Arthur McNutt Lockwood, 
commercial traveller, all of Canning, N.S., and Robert Chalmers Dickey, of 
Canard, N.S. 

First or Provisional Directors : — John Henry Potter, William Russell Potter, Alfred 
Potter, Arthur McNutt Lockwood and Robert Chalmers Dickey. 

Chief place of Business : — Canning, N.S. 

Objects of the Company : — The building, purchasing, acquiring, selling, hiring, charter- 
ing, employing, owning, navigating, managing and maintaining sailing vessels, 
steamships and all other kinds of craft ; the conveying and carrying of goods, 
wares, merchandise, freight and cargoes of all descriptions, as well as passengers, 
mails and other traffic between such ports in any part of the world as may seem 
expedient ; the buying and selling of and trading in cargoes and merchandise for 
freight, hire and otherwise, and generally the carrying on the busiqess of ship- 
owning in all its branches ; the operations of the company to be carried on at 
Canning, in the county of King's, in the province of Nova Scotia, and elsewhere 
throughout the Dominion of Canada. 

*THE ONTARIO MILLING AND MANUFACTURING COMPANY '(Limited). 

Incorporated July 6, 1901. . _ . . Amount of capital stock, $40,000. 

Number of shares, 400. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members: — Thomas Meyers, cheese manufacturer, of the township of Bastard, 
Ont. ; Levy Sidney Lewis, merchant; and John Nelson Knowlton, contractor, both 
of the village of Newboro', Ont. ; and Lucas Hammond Kerr, farmer ; and John 
Bolton Pinkerton, farmer, both of the township of South Crosby, Ont. 

First or Provisional Directors : — Thomas Meyers, John Nelson Knowlton and Lucas 
Hammond Kerr. 

ChieJ place of Business : — Town of Deloraine, Man. 

Objects oj the Company : — {a.) The carrying on of a general milling and manufacturing 
business, making wheat into flour, oats into meal, and other products of the soil 
into articles of food, and putting the same up in boxes, barrels, bags or cans, and 
dealing in the same as an article of commerce ; (b.) The erecting of mills, factories 
and elevators and equipping them with the necessary machinery, and putting in 
pipes to convey water to their places of manufacturing ; the operations of the com- 
pany to be carried on at Deloraine, in the province of Manitoba, and elsewhere 
throughout the Dominion of Canada. 

'THE WESTERN ELEVATOR COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated July 6, 1901. . - . . Amount of capital stock, $100,000. 

Number of shares, 1,000. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — Thomas Bray Baker, grain merchant ; Alexander Reid, grain 
merchant ; Frank Morton Morse, merchant ; William George MacMahon, merchant ; 
and John Henry Munson, barrister, all of Winnipeg, Man. 



SYNOPSIS OF LETTERS PATENT 19 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief place of Business ;— City of Winnipeg, Man. 

Objects of the Company : — To acquire, hold, build, lease and to sell or otherwise dispose 
of elevators and elevator property of all kinds, also grain warehouses ; also to buy, 
sell and deal in grain and produce of all kinds, and to carry on the business 
usually transacted by owners of elevators and grain warehouses ; the operations of 
the company to be carried on throughout the Dominion of Canada. 



'THE CLEVELAND-SARNIA SAWMILLS COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated July 26, 1901. - - - - Amount of capital stock, $500,000. 

Number of shares, 5,000. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — Liberty Dean Holden, lumberman, of Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A.; 
Albert Fairchild Holden, mining engineer, of Salt Lake, U.S.A. ; and John MarCin 
Diver, lumberman ; David Milne, merchant ; Frederick Forsyth Pardee, barrister- 
at-law ; and Mary Grace Mahony, book-keeper, all of Sarnia, Ont. 

First or Provisional Directors : — Liberty Dean Holden, Albert Fairchild Holden, John 
Martin Diver, David Milne and Frederick Forsyth Pardee. 

■ChieJ place oj Business : — Town of Sarnia, Ont. 

Objects of the Company : — (a.) To buy, sell, manufacture timber and lumber in all its 
branches, and for such purposes to erect, equip, manufacture and operate saw- 
mills, factories and other plant necessary therefor, and to have, hold and acquire 
from time to time Ky purchase, lease, exchange or otherwise timber lands, licenses 
to cut timber and other property, real or personal, required for the purposes of the 
company, and to alienate the same at pleasure, and to act as agents for others for 
any of the aforesaid purposes ; (b.) To build, acquire, own, charter or lease, navi- 
gate and use steam and other vessels so far as may be necessary or expedient for 
the conveyance of the products of the company's mills, the towing of logs or other 
like purposes of the company; (c.) For the purpose of utilizing the slabs, sidings 
and other refuse products of the company's saw-mills, to construct, equip, maintain 
and operate the necessary buildings and plant for the manufacture of salt ; (d.) So 
far as deemed necessary or expedient for the purposes of the company to construct 
and maintain roads, bridges, ways, wharfs, docks, elevators, warehouses or other 
buildings, and to construct, own, or lease, maintain and operate telegraph and tele- 
phone lines ; (e.) To generate electricity for the purpose of lighting and heating or 
operating the mills, buildings, platforms, docks, plant and machinery and other 
works and property of the company; [f) To establish shops and stores on the said 
lands or near the mills of the company, and to purchase and vend general mer- 
chandise so far as necessary to supply the requirements of the officers, servants, 
workmen and employees of the company. 

Provided that nothing herein contained shall be construed to interfere with 
any private rights or to confer on the said company the right of building bridges, 
piers or works over any navigable river in Canada without the consent of the 
Governor in Council, or of erecting posts or placing their lines of telegraph (or 
telephone) upon the line of any railway without the consent of the company or 
parties to whom such railway belongs. 

Provided also that any message in relation to the administration of justice, 
the arrest of criminals, the discovery or prevention of crime and Government 
messages or despatches shall always be transmitted in preference to any other 
message or despatch if required by any person connected with the administration 
of justice or any person thereunto authorized by any Minister of Canada. 
29->2i 



20 DEPART3IENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
'THE SEMI-READY CLOTHING COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated July 26, 190 L - - - - Amount of capital stock, $200,000. 

Number of shares, 2,000. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members ; — William H. Wyman, manufacturer ; Andrew Mercer, manufac- 
turer ; Herbert A. Beatty, manufacturer ; and Rodney D. Chipp, clerk, all of Mont- 
real, Que. ; and Robert Neill, merchant, of Peterborough, Ont. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief place oj Business : — City of Montreal, Que. 

Objects of the Company: — (a.) To carry on business as wholesale and retail dealers, 
manufacturers of and contractors for boots, shoes, clothing and wearing apparel 
generally, and to manufacture, sell, trade and deal in all kinds ot machinery, 
plant, tools, furniture and materials used in the manufacture of the same; (b.) To 
purchase or otherwise acquire from any individual any business of a nature or 
character similar to the business which this company is authorized to carry on, 
and any assets, privileges, rights, contracts or liabilities appertaining to the same ; 
(c.) To acquire shares, debentures and securities of other companies having objects 
altogether or in part similar to those of this company as the consideration for 
goods, wares or merchandise sold to such other company in the ordinary course 
of business ; (d.) To act as commission merchants and manufacturers' agents in 
respect of goods, wares or merchandise in which this company is authorized to 
deal ; the operations of the company to be carried on at the city of Montreal, in 
the province of Quebec, and elsewhere throughout the Dominion of Canada. 



'THE STANDARD ASBESTOS COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated July 26, 1901. _ . . . Amount of capital stock, $150,000. 
Number of shares, 1,500. — Amount of each share. 



Corporate Members : — Robert Thomas Hopper, merchant ; Robert C. Smith, K.C., 
Frederick A. Johnson, accountant ; and Frederick H. Markey, advocate, all of 
Montreal, Que. ; and John G. Turriff, gentleman, of Ottawa, Ont. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief place of Business: — City of Montreal, Que. 

Objects of the Company: — (a.) To acquire by lease, purchase, location or otherwise 
mineral or other lands in the province of Quebec or elsewhere in the Dominion of 
Canada, and to mine, work and develop the resources of the same : (6.) To develop 
any mineral lands held by the company or by others; (c.) To search for, mine, 
quarry, work, raise, make merchantable by any process, purchase, sell and deal in 
asbestos, iron and other minerals, metals and substances ; (c?.) To build, acquire, 
charter or lease, navigate and use steam and other vessels or boats so far as may be 
necessary or expedient for the conveyance of the products of the company's mines 
or other like purposes of the company ; («.) To build and maintain all necessary 
wharfs, piers or docks, and to build, provide, lease and use telegraph and telephone 
lines, aqueducts, reservoirs, roads, streets and other works which may be deemed 
expedient or necessary in promoting the objects of the company ; (/!) To purchase 
or acquire from any individual in whole or in part any business of a nature and 
character similar to the bu3iness which this company is authorized to carry on, as 
also the good-will and any lands, property, privileges, rights, contracts and liabili 
ties appertaining thereto, and to purchase or otherwise acquire shares of other 



SYNOPSIS OF LETTERS PATENT 21 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

similar companies as the consideration for goods, wares or merchandise sold to 
such similar companies in the ordinary course of business. 

Provided that nothing herein contained shall be construed to interfere with 
any private rights, or to confer on the said company the right of building bridges, 
piers or works over any navigable river in Canada without the consent of the 
Oovernor in Council, or of erecting posts or placing their lines of telegraph or tele- 
phone upon the line of any railway without the consent of the company or parties 
to whom such railway belongs. 

Provided also that any message in relation to the administration of justice, 
the arrest of criminals, the discovery or prevention of crime and Government 
messages or despatches shall always be transmitted in preference to any other 
message or despatch if required by any person connected with the administration 
of justice or any person thereunto authorized by any Minister of Canada. 



'THE SHIP GLENDOVEY COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated July 30, 1901. . . . . Amount of capital stock, $20,000. 

Number of shares, 200. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — George E. M. Lewis, manufacturer, of Lewiston, N.S. ; Bertha 
J. Lewis, married woman ; and Frank L. Lewis, clerk, both of Truro, N.S. ; John 
Lewis, manufacturer ; and John Lewis, jr., clerk, both of Brown ville, Maine, U.S.A. 

First or Provisional Directors: — George E. M. Lewis, Bertha J. Lewis and John Lewis. 

Chief place of Business : — Lewiston, N.S. 

Objects of the Company : — (a.) To acquire, manage, own, sell and build a ship or ships 
and sell or dispose of the same, and to carry on business as ship-owners and common 
carriers by sea ; {b.) To build, construct and own or lease all necessary wharfs and 
docks. 



'THE DIAMOND LIGHTING COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated August 6, 1901. - - . Amount of capital stock, $500,000. 

Number of shares, 5,000. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — William Joseph Poupore, contractor, of Ottawa, Ont. ; John 
Augustin Rafter, agent ; Edward Patrick Ronayne, merchant ; Isaac Clelland 
McRae, gentleman ; and Michael James Morrison, advocate, all of Montreal, Que. ; 
James Charles Malone, contractor ; Jacques Bureau, advocate ; and Frangois 
Simeon Tourigny, advocate, all of Three Rivers, Que. ; and Theodore Nadeau, of 
New York, U.S.A. 

First or Provisional Directors: — William Joseph Poupore, Theodore Nadeau, James 
Charles Malone, John Augustin Rafter and Edward Patrick Ronayne. 

Chief place oj Business : — City of Montreal, Que. 

Objects of the Company : — {a.) To manufacture, supply, sell and dispose of gas, gasoline 
and acetylene for the purpose of light or heat and for any other purpose for which 
the same may be used ; (6.) To deal with, manufacture and render saleable and 
sell or otherwise dispose of coke, coal, tar, pitch, asphaltum, ammoniacal liquor 
and other residual products arising or to be obtained from the materials used in 
the manufacture of gas ; (c.) To acquire, manufacture, construct, lay, erect, main- 
tain and operate all works for holding, receiving and purifying gas, gasoline and 



DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

acetylene and all other buildings and works, structures, apparatus, meters, pipes, 
appliances, fittings, supplies and machinery necessary or advisable in connection 
with the said business; {d.) To acquire by purchase, license or otherwise and use, 
lease, sell, license or otherwise dispose of any invention or letters patent or any 
right to use or employ any inventions in connection with the production, manufac- 
ture or supply of heating and illuminating gas or of any of the residual products 
thereof; (e.) To acquire from any individual any business within the objects of 
the company, and any lands, property, privileges, rights, patents of invention, 
contracts and liabilities appertaining to the same, and to acquire shares in any 
similar company as the consideration for goods, wares, merchandise, patent or 
other rights sold to such similar company in the ordinary course of business ; (/.) 
To construct furnaces, coke ovens, wharfs, docks, offices and buildings deemed 
to be necessary or expedient for the purposes of the company, and to purchase, 
charter, build and repair and navigate steam and other vessels so far as may be 
necessary or expedient for the conveyance of the products of the company's works 
and other like purposes of the company; [g.) To carry on the business of manu- 
facturers of, dealers in and contractors for the sale, purchase and exchange of gas, 
oil and electric lights or other burners and of all material used in the manufacture 
thereof. 



'THE FENLIN LEATHER COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated August 10, 1901. - - - - Amount of capital stock, $250,000. 
Number of shares, 5,000. — Amount of each share, 



Corporate Members : — Henry Esson Macintosh, merchant ; Henry Gransback Fenlin^ 
manufacturer; Leslie Rose Dowker, merchant; and Mary Elizabeth Fenlin, all of 
Montreal, Que. ; and Charles Smith Hyman, merchant, M.P., of London, Ont. 

First or Provisional Directors : — Henry Esson Macintosh, Harry Gransback Fenlin, 
Charles Smith Hyman and Leslie Rose Dowker. 

Chief place of Business : — City of Montreal, Que. 

Objects oj the Company : — (a.) The manufacture and tanning of all kinds of hides and 
skins into leather and the sale of the same in all its branches; (6.) Acting as 
agents for other manufacturers and dealers in any of the above mentioned goods; 
(c.) To purchase or otherwise acquire all buildings, machinery and motive power 
necessary for the company's business and any patent right or license for any 
invention relating to the purposes of the company which may seem necessary or 
expedient, and to alienate the same at pleasure ; the operations of the company to 
be carried on at the city of Montreal and elsewhere throughout the Dominion of 
Canada. 



'THE PACIFIC COAL COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated August 31, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, |1, 000,000. 

Number of shares, 20,000. — Amount of each share, $50. 

Corporate Members: — Sir William Cornelius VanHorne, Knight ; Richard Blad worth 
Angus, Esquire, and Charles Rudolph Hosmer, gentleman, all of Montreal, Que. ; 
and Edmund Boyd Osier, broker, and Wilmot Deloui Matthews, commission mer- 
chant, both of Toronto, Ont. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members 

Chief place of Business : — City of Montreal, Que. 



SYNOPSIS OF LETTERS PATENT 23 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

Objects of the Company : — (a.) To mine and extract coal and produce petroleum and 
generally to carry on the trade or business of colliery proprietors, coal and coke 
manufacturers, oil producers and refiners, miners and mineral engineers in all their 
branches ; (6.) To search for, get, mine and extract, quarry, work, raise, make 
merchantable, produce, mill, smelt and reduce coal, petroleum, coke, lignite, sand- 
stone, iron, ironstone, gold, silver, copper and copper ores, manganese and other 
minerals, clays or mineral substances; (c.) To make fire bricks and to manufacture 
gas and other products from coal, the product of the company's mines ; (o?.) To 
manufacture timber, saw logs and sawn lumber upon any mining lands acquired, 
required or owned by the company; (e.) To build, construct and maintain all 
necessary buildings, reservoirs, aqueducts, canals, wharfs, bridges, piers, docks, 
warehouses, roads, water powers, dams or sluice ways or other work required to 
facilitate or necessary or convenient for the objects of the company; (/.) To 
acquire and utilize water power for the purposes of compressing air or generating 
electricity for lighting, heating and motor purposes in connection with the build- 
ings and other works of the company; \q.) To build, acquire, own, charter or 
lease, navigate and use steam and other vessels required for the purpose of or 
in connection with the carrying on of the business of the company ; (A.) To pur- 
chase or otherwise acquire any letters patent, rights or privileges in connection 
with the mining business of the company and any license to use and work the 
same, and to sell or lease any patent or patents or license so acquired by them, or 
any right of selling, using or manufacturing thereunder respectively; (i.) To pur- 
chase or otherwise acquire shares, debentures and securities of other similar com- 
panies as the consideration for goods, wares or merchandise sold to such similar 
companies in the ordinary course of business. 



Supplementary Letters Patent issued August 31, 1901, to 

'THE RIORDON PAPER MILLS' (Limited). 

Increasing the capital stock of the said company to the sum of $1,000,000, being an 
addition of 5,000 shares of $100 each to the present capital stock. 



'THE DOMINION HAY COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated September 11, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, $20,000. 
Number of shares, 200. — Amount of each share, 



Corporate Members : — Claude Brigham Jameson, forage contractor, and Frank Arthur 
Judd, accountant, both of St. John, N.B., and Joseph Judd, accountant, of New 
York, U.S.A.; Joseph Alcide Raymond, trader, of St. Johns, Que. ; and George 
Edouard Ouimet, trader, of Louise ville. Que. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

ChieJ j^lcice of Business : — City of Montreal, Que. 

Objects of the Company : — (a.) To carry on the business of dealers in and forwarders of 
hay, fodder and other agricultural products, and in connection therewith to acquire 
and operate mechanical devices, patented or otherwise, factories, presses, elevators, 
cars, motive power and rolling stock; (b.) To acquire any patent or patents for 
any invention for or relating to the business stated in clause {a), and to purchase 
or otherwise acquire shares in any similar company as the consideration for goods, 
wares or merchandise sold to such similar company in the ordinary course of busi- 
ness, and to dispose thereof at pleasure. 



24 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
'GORDON, IRONSIDE AND FARES COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated September 11, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, $1,000,000. 

Number of shares, 10,000. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members: — James Thomas Gordon, stock dealer ; William Henry Fares, stock 
dealer ; Thomas Hodgson, pork packer, and George Earl Betts, accountant, all of 
Winnipeg, Man. ; and Robert Ironside, stock dealer, of Montreal, Que. 

First or Provisional Directors : — James Thomas Gordon, Robert Ironside and William 
Henry Fares. 

Chief place of Business : — City o^ Winnipeg, Man. 

Objects of the Company: — (a.) To carry on the business of dealers and traders in live 
stock (which term shall include horses, cattle, sheep, pigs and other useful and 
merchantable animals and poultry), the business of farmers, live stock ranchers 
and butchers; (6.) The business of importing, exporting, shipping, raising, keep- 
ing, buying, selling and trafficking in live stock; (c.) Of manufacturing, producing, 
packing, canning, curina:, buying, selling and dealing in all products of and from 
such live stock, garden, agricultural and dairy products and general provisions ; 
(d.) So far as necessary for the purposes of the company's business hereinbefore 
mentioned, to carry on the business of cold storage and cold storage warehouse- 
men, and to construct, acquire and operate cold storage plants, warehouses and 
abattoirs; (e.) To construct, acquire and operate boats by steam or otherwise, 
cars and vehicles for the purpose of and in connection with the said business ; (/.) 
To acquire from any individual any business of the nature or character which this 
company is authorized to carry on and the good-will thereof; (g.) To acquire stock 
in any other company having objects altogether or in part similar to those of this 
company as the consideration for goods, wares or merchandise sold to such other 
company in the ordinary course of business. 



'THE PROSPERARE SHIPPING COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated September 11, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, $17,000. 
Number of shares, 170. — Amount of each share, 



Corporate Members : — Samuel B. Robbins, master-mariner ; John A. Tilley, master- 
mariner ; J. J. Clark Robbins, clerk, and Blake G. Burrill, broker, all of Yar- 
mouth, N.S. ; and Robert B. Somerville, of Springfield, N.B. 

First or Provisional Directors : — Samuel B. Robbins, John A. Tilley and Robert B. 
Somerville. 

Chief place of Business : — Town of Yarmouth, N.S. 

Objects of the Company: — (a.) The building, purchasing, acquiring, owning, holding, 
chartering, working, selling, leasing, repairing and operating sailing vessels, steam- 
ships and other vessels of all kinds for general freighting and transportation 
purposes, including the carrying for hire of coal, minerals, lumber, merchandise 
and cargoes of all descriptions, as well as the conveyance of passengers and mails 
and other traffic in and between any port or ports in the Dominion of Canada and 
between such ports and any British or foreign ports; (b.) The buying and selling 
of and trading in cargoes and merchandise for freight, hire or otherwise, and 
generally the carrying on the business of ship-owning in all its branches ; (c.) The 
building, purchasing, acquiring, owning, hiring or leasing of wharfs, piers, docks, 
warehouses and office pi'emises necessary or useful for the carrying on of the said 
business and the attainment of the objects aforesaid. 



SYNOPSIS OF LET TEES PATENT 25 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

Supplementary Letters Patent issued September 11, 1901, to 

'THE CREME DE LA CR^ME CIGAR COMPANY' (Limited). 

Changing the name of the said company to that of 

'J. M. FORTIER' (Limited). 



'THE BOOKLaVERS LIBRARY' (Limited). 

Incorporated September 11, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, 8100,000. 

Number of shares, 10,000. — Amount of each share, $10. 

Corporate Members : — Seymour Eaton, librarian ; and John Ebenezer Bryant, managing 
editor, both of Philadelphia, Penn., U.S.A.; and Edward John Boyd, manager ; 
Jerrold Ball, physician, and Goodwin Gibson, barrister, all of Toronto, Ont. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief place oj Business : — City of Toronto, Ont. 

Objects of the Company: — {a.) To establish, conduct and maintain circulating and other 
libraries in the cities and towns throughout the Dominion of Canada; (6.) To 
deal with any newspaper or newspapers, magazine or periodical for said purposes ; 
(c.) To publish books, pamphlets, bulletins, magazines or other periodicals in fur- 
therance of the objects of its business; {d.) To carry on the trade or trades of 
printers, binders, engravers or lithographers so far as deemed necessary or expedi- 
ent for the purposes of the business hereinbefore mentioned. 



'THE AMPERE ELECTRIC MANUFACTURING COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated September 14, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, $50,000. 

Number of shares, 5,000. — Amount of each share, $10. 

Corporate Members: — Charles Ross Whitehead, manufacturer ; David Alexander Pringle, 
civil engineer ; Robert Edmund Thomas Pringle, merchant ; Francis Henry Leonard, 
jr., electrical engineer, and Edward Egbert Cary, manufacturer, all of Montreal, 
Que. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

ChieJ place of Business : — City of Montreal, Que. 

Objects oj the Company : — {a.) To manufacture, acquire, hold, operate, utilize and dis- 
pose of electrical apparatus, machinery, appliances and mechanism of all kinds and 
classes whatsoever, and all apparatus, machinery appliances and mechanism used 
in connection therewith and the materials used therein ; ib.) To produce electric 
energy by means of water power, steam power or otherwise, and to utilize, 
transmit and dispose of the same for heat, light, power and any other use whatso- 
ever, and for the purposes thereof to place poles and string wires thereon and to 
lay underground conduits ; provided that no such poles shall be placed or wires 
strung thereon or underground conduits laid except with the consent of the city, 
town or municipality in which such works are proposed to be carried on ; (c. ) To 
acquire, set up, install and dispose of plant for the production of electric energy by 
means of water power, steam power or otherwise, and for the utilization, transmis- 
sion and disposition thereof for heat, light, power and any other uses whatsoever ; 



26 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

(d.) To acquire, hold, utilize, develop and dispose of patent rights or inventions 
used in connection with the purposes of the company; (e.) To acquire stock in any 
company formed in Canada for similar purposes as the consideration for goods, 
wares, merchandise, patent rights or articles dealt in by the company and sold by 
the company to such other company in the ordinary course of business. 



'THE RADFORD PAPER COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated October 22, 1901. - . . . Amount of capital stock, |2,000. 

Number of shares, 20. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — Thomas Henry Radford, manager ; Alfred Roy, commercial trav- 
eller ; Edward Melbourne Roberts, builder ; John James Roberts, builder, and 
David Yuile, manufacturer, all of Montreal, Que. 

First or Provisional Directors: — Thomas Henry Radford, Alfred Roy and Edward 
Melbourne Roberts. 

ChieJ place of Business : — City of Montreal, Que. 

Objects of the Company : — (a.) The manufacture of pulp and paper; (6.) To buy and 
sell paper, books and stationery goods; (c.) To buy and sell paper mills and 
machinery for the manufacture of pulp and paper. 



'THE CONSUMERS ELECTRIC COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated October 22, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, $300,000* 
Number of shares, 3,000. — Amount of each share, 



Corporate Members : — Russell Blackburn, lumberman ; John William McRae, gentle- 
man ; Henry Kelly Egan, lumberman ; Hiram Robinson, lumberman ; Alexander 
Eraser, lumberman; John Burns Eraser, lumberman ; and William Cameron Edwards, 
lumberman, all of Ottawa, Ont. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief place of Business : — City of Ottawa, Ont. 

Objects of the Company : — {a.) To produce, manufacture, supply, acquire, lease, sell and 
dispose of electricity and electric currents for heat, light and power and for 
any other purposes the same may be used ; {b.) To acquire, manufacture, 
construct, lay, erect, maintain, complete and operate all works, structures, appar- 
atus, motors, poles, wires, appliances and connections, materials, supplies and 
machinery as are or may be in any way used in connection with the business of 
production, manufacturing, acquiring, leasing, selling and supplying electric cur- 
rent or electricity for any purpose, a:nd to lease, sell or otherwise deal with or dis- 
pose of the same; (c.) To acquire by purchase, license, lease or otherwise and ta 
use, license, lease or otherwise dispose of any water powers or other powers, rights,, 
easements and privileges in connection with the production, manufacture, acquir- 
ing, leasing or supplying electricity or electric current for heat, light or power or 
for any other purpose for which the same may be used, and also to acquire by pur- 
chase, license, lease or otherwise and use and in any of the said ways again 
dispose of any inventions, letters patent for inventions or the right to use any 
invention in any way connected with or pertaining to the business of the com- 
pany ; {d.) To acquire shares in the capital stock, debentures and securities of 



SYNOPSIS OF LETTERS PATENT 27 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

other electric companies possessing powers similar to those of the company as the 
consideration for goods, wares or merchandise sold to such other companies in the 
ordinary course of business. 



'THE CAMPBELL MANUFACTURING COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated October 22, 190L .... Amount of capital stock, $75,000. 

Number of shares, 750. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — Frederick Richard Lanigan, George Pierce Butters, Benjamin 
Wesley Beyer, and William Henry Butters, manufacturers, and John Wesley 
Blair, advocate, all of Montreal, Que. 

First or Provisional Directors : — Frederick Richard Lanigan, George Pierce Butters^ 
Benjamin Wesley Beyer and William Henry Butters. 

Chief place of Business : — City of Montreal, Que. 

Objects of the Company : — The manufacture and sale of clothing and clothing supplies ; 
the operations of the company to be carried on at the city and district of Mont- 
real and elsewhere throughout the Dominion of Canada. 



Supplementary Letters Patent issued October 31, 1901, to 

'THE STANDARD SHIRT COMPANY' (Limited). 

Increasing the capital stock of the said company to the sum of $1,000,000, being an 
addition of 8,000 shares of $100 each to the present capital stock ; also extending 
the powers of the said company so as to embrace and include the following, viz : — 
(a.) To acquire stock in other similar companies as the consideration for goods, wares 
or merchandise sold to such similar companies in the ordinary course of business ; 
if>.) To carry on the business of printers, lithographers and binders so far as neces- 
sary for the printing and lithographing of bill heads, letter heads, labels, office 
stationery and other like articles, and for the manufacture of blank books, forms, 
sample books, &c., for use in the company's business, and when the plant, presses 
and machinery employed for said purposes are not required in connection with the 
company's business as above mentioned to use and employ the same in carrying on 
similar operations and in the performance of similar work for others who may 
require such services ; (c.) For the purpose of utilizing the surplus cotton, linen 
and other fabrics which enter into the manufacture of the goods mentioned in the 
company's letters patent of incorporation and for prevention of waste, to manufac- 
ture boxes, cases and any other goods which may be advantageously manufactured 
therefrom, and any other boxes, cases or other like articles deemed necessary or 
expedient in carrying on the company's business, and to deal in all such articles. 



'THE SEAMLESS BOAT AND CANOE COMPANY' (Limited). 
Incorporated November 7, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, $100,000. 
Number of shares, 1,000. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — Edwin Hanson, financial agent ; A. Guy Ross, manager ; H. 
Markland Molson, gentleman ; and Augustus J. Ferguson, broker and financial 
agent, all of Montreal, Que. ; and G. Herrick Duggan, engineer, of the town of 
Lachine, Que. 



28 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDOUARD VFl, A. 1902 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief place oj Business : — City of Montreal, Que. 

Objects oJ the Company : — (a.) To acquire by purchase, license or otherwise the right 
for Canada or elsewhere to manufacture and sell seamless boats and canoes and to 
carry on the business of manufacturing and selling such seamless boats and canoes, 
and for the purpose of utilizing the surplus materials employed in such manufac- 
ture and of avoiding waste to manufacture and sell any other goods, wares or 
merchandise capable of being made from such surplus material; (6.) To purchase 
or acquire by lease or otherwise such patent rights or licenses in any relation to 
the business of the company hereinbefore mentioned as may be deemed necessary 
or useful, and to alienate the same at pleasure. 



Supplementary Letters Patent issued November 11, 1901, to 

'THE TORONTO TYPE FOUNDRY COMPANY' (Limited). 

Increasing the capital stock of the said company to the sum of $200,000, being an addi- 
tion of 500 shares of $100 each to the present capital stock. 



'THE PROVINCIAL SECRET SERVICE AGENCY' (Limited). 

Incorporated November 27, 1901. - - - Amount of capital stock, $5,000. 

Number of shares, 50. — Amount of each share, $100. 

Corporate Members : — Gaston Boissonnault ; detective ; Ernest Dubord, news agent ; 
Fran^ois-Xavier Groulx, baggageman, and Cordelia Demers, widow, all of Mont- 
real, Que. ; and Philippe Horace Anselme Caron, insurance agent, of Little Metis, 
Que. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief place of Business : — City of Montreal, Que. 

Objects of the Company : — To carry on the business of private detectives, subject to any 
regulations which may at any time be in force in any of the provinces of the 
Dominion relative thereto, to collect and give information, and generally to carry 
on the business of an intelligence office. 



'THE SCHOONER LORD OF AVON COMPANY' (Limited). 

Incorporated December 14, 1901. - - • Amount of capital stock, $16,000. 

Number of shares, 64. — Amount of each share, $250. 

Corporate Members : — Benjamin Trefry, master-mariner ; William Chipman Balcom, 
merchant ; Robert Burns, rigger ; Edward Fitch Sweet, blacksmith, and Milton 
Harris Martin, master-mariner, all of Hantsport, N.S. 

First or Provisional Directors : — Benjamin Trefry, Milton Harris Martin and Robert 
Burns. 

Chief place of Business- — Hantsport, N.S. 

Objects oj the Company : — {a.) To build, acquire, purchase, own, hold, manage, use, 
employ, charter, sell, convey, lease, dispose of or otherwise deal with the schooner 



SYNOPSIS OF LETTERS PATENT 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 



' Lord of Avon ' ; (h.) To carry on the trade or business of managing, using, employ- 
ing, chartering or otherwise dealing with the said schooner, and to carry on with 
and in respect of the said schooner the trade or business of a ship-owner and 
common carrier by sea, and to do, perform and transact all other acts, matters and 
business incident to the occupation of ship-owner and common carrier by sea. 



'THE DOMINION SUBWAY COMPANY' (Limited). 
(Re-incorporation.) 

Incorporated December 23, 190L - - - Amount of capital stock, $100,000. 
Number of shares, 1,000. — Amount of each share, 



Corporate Members : — Charles Fleetford Sise, gentleman ; the Hon. Robert Mackay, 
senator ; Robert Archer, gentleman ; Hugh Paton, gentleman, and Charles Cassils, 
gentleman, all of Montreal, Que. 

First or Provisional Directors : — The said corporate members. 

Chief place of Business : — Montreal, Que. 

Objects of the Company : — (a.) Constructing, maintaining and operating, owning, leas- 
ing, selling, using and licensing others to use underground conduits, wires, cables 
and pneumatic tubes or other apparatus and appliances, with power to manufac- 
ture such apparatus and plant as may be necessary to the business, and to transmit 
for tolls such parcels and packages as can be transmitted by pneumatic tubes; (b.) 
And to acquire by purchase, lease or otherwise and own and hold any patents or 
patent of invention or licenses under letters patent relating to the said business, 
and to lease the same or rights therein to others ; (c.) And to acquire stock and 
shares in other similar companies authorized to carry on business in Canada as 
the consideration for goods, wares, merchandise, patent or other rights sold to 
such other companies in the ordinary course of business, and to alienate the same 
at pleasure. 



1-2 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 A. 1902 

INDEX TO SYNOPSIS OF LETTERS PATENT. 

PAGE. 

Ampere Electric Manufacturing Co 25 - 

Antigua (Barquentine) Co 8 

Barqueiitine Antigua Co 8 

Barquentine Trinidad Co 9 

Bertram (John) and Sons Co 14 

Booklovers Library 25 

British Yukon Land Co 5 

Brookside Shipping Co G 

Campbell Manufacturing Co 27 

Canada Linseed Oil Mills 13 

Canadian Bronze Co 14 

Canadian General Electric Co. (Sup. Let. Pat. ).J. 10 

Canadian Salt Co 12 

Canadian Yukon Lumber Co 17 

C. J. Smith Estate Co 7 

Cleveland-Sarnia Saw Mills Co '. 19 

Colchester Steamship Co ~ 16 

Consumers Electric Co j 26 

Creme de la Creme Cigar Co. (Sup. Let. Pat. i Changed to J. M. Fortier 25 

Crowds Nest Pass Coal Co. (Sup. Let. Pat). ■ .' 10 

Diamond Lighting Co 21 

Dominion Hay Co .... 23 

Dominion Industrial Co 7 

Dominion Subway Co. (Re-incorporation) 29 



Everett, J. D. (Ship) Co. 



Fenlin Leather Co 22 

Florence R. Hewson Co ..., . 5 

Fortier (J. M.) (Sup. Let. Pat.) Formerly Cr^me de la Creme Cigar Co 25 

Glendovey (Ship Co. ) 21 

Gordon, Ironside and Fares Co 24 

Gorham Co 10 

Hewson (Florence R. ) Co 5 

Ida M. Shaffner Co 6 

J. D. Everett Co. (Ship) 9 

J. M. Fortier. (Sup. Let. Pat.) Formerly Cr^me de la Creme Cigar Co 25 

John Bertram and Sons Co 14 

Lakeside Navigation Co. (Sup. Let. Pat. ) Changed to Niagara, St. Catharines and Toronto Navi- 
gation Co 15 

Lord of Avon Co. (Schooner) . . 28 

Margaret May Riley Co 10 

Minas Basin Steamship Co , 18 

Niagara, St. Catharines and Toronto Navigation Co. (Sup. Let. Pat.) Formerly Lakeside Navi- 
gation Co 15 

North American Mail Steamship Co 13 

31 



32 DEPARTAIENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Ontario Milling and Manufacturing Co 18 

Ontario Powder Co 1& 

Pacific Coal Co.." 22 

Pennsylvania Coal Co .... i4 

Prosperare Shipping Co 24 

Provincial Secret Service Agency .•i 28 

Radford Paper Co^ i 26 

Riley (Margaret May) Co. 10 

Riordon Paper Mills. (Sup.Xet. Pat. ) 23 

Sarnia Bay Tov^^ing and Salvage Co . . . 15 

Schooner Lord of Avon Co 28 

Seamless Boat and Canoe Co 27 

Semi-Ready Clothing Co 20 

ShaflFner (IdaM.)C(> 6 

Ship Glendovey Ca ' 21 

Ship J. D. Everett Co 9 

Smith (C. J.) Estate Co 7 

Standard Asbestos C5 .\( 20 

Standard Shirt Co. (Sup. Let. Pat.) 27 

Toronto Type Foundry Co. (Sup. Let. Pat.) 28^ 

Trinidad (Barquentine) Co 9 

Usher Steamship Co. 11 

Western Condensed Milk, Canning, Coffee and Creamery Co 11 

Western Elevator Co 18 

Wright Taper Roller Bearing Co 8 

Yukon Trust Co 12 



1-2 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 A. 1902 



LIST OF COMPANIES 

Licensed under 61 Vic, Chap. 49, 

TO CARRY ON MINING OPERATIONS WITH THE PRIVILEGES OF A 
FREE MINER WITHIN THE YUKON AND NORTH- 
WEST TERRITORIES OF CANADA. 

' QUARTZ CREEK (YUKON) SYNDICATE ' (Limited). 

Date of license, January 2, 190L _ _ _ Authorized capital, £100,000. 

Chief place of Business : — London, England. 
Agent or manager in the Yukon Territory : — Joseph Whiteside Boyle, Dawson City 



' LOS ANGELES AND YUKON MINING COMPANY.' 

Date of license, January 10, 1901. - — — Authorized capital, $400,000. 

Chief place of Business : — Los Angeles, California. 

Agent or manager in the Yukon Territory : — Mrs. Alice Rollins Crane, Dawson 
City. 



'SYNDICAT LYONNAIS DU KLONDYKE.' 

Date of license, March 2, 1901. - - Authorized capital, 1,100,000 francs. 

Chief place of Business : — Lyon, France. 

Agent or manager in the Yukon Ten'itory : — 

M. Louis Paillard and M. Hippolyte de Silan. 



'DOMINION GOLD MINING COMPANY.' 

Dateof license, March 18, 1901. _ _ _ Authorized capital, $750,000. 

Chief place of Business : — Danville, Illinois, U.S.A. 

Agent or manager in the Yukon Territory : — Frank C. Lory, Dawson City. . 
29—3 33 



34 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
* BIG SALMON HYDRAULIC COMPANY.' 

Date of license, February 8, 190L _ _ _ Authorized capital, $100,000. 

Chief place of Business : — Seattle, Washington Terr., U.S.A. 
Agent or manager in the Yukon Territory : — Falcon Joslin, Dawson City. 



'THE DOME (YUKON) GOLD MINES ' (Limited). 

Dateof license, October 1, 1901. _ , _ Authorized capital, £100,000. 

Chief place of Business : — London, Eng. 
Agent or manager in the Yukon Territory : — George R. Clazy, Dawson City. 



1-2 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 A. 1902 



INDEX TO COMPANIES LICENSED TO CARRY ON MINING OPERATIONS 
IN THE YUKON AND NORTH-WEST TERRITORIES. 

Page. 

Big Salmon Hydraulic Co 34 

Dome (Yukon) Gold Mines 34 

Dominion Gold MiTiing Co 33 

Los Angeles and Yukon MiningCo 33 

Quartz Creek (Yukon) Syndicate 33 

Syndicat Lyonnais du Klondyke 33 



29—34 35 



1-2 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 



A. 1902 



COMMISSIONS TO PUBLIC OFFICERS, 



List of Public Officers to whom Commissions have issued during the past year (1901). 



Name. 



Armour et al, Hon. John 
Douglas 



Office or Appointment. 



Commissioners per Dedivius Potestatem within the 
Province of Ontario 



Atkins, Benjamin Richard 
Boultbee, John 



. A Sub-Collector in H. M. Customs. 



Britton, Byron Moffatt , 



BuUis, James Deming ..... 

Campbell, Peter C 

Casault, Kt., Hon. Sir Louis 
Edelmar 



Choquette, Francois Xavier. . 



Congdon, Frederick Tenny- 
son '. . 

Cowan, Isaac S 



Da vies, K.C.M.G., Hon. Sir 

Louis Henry , 

Desmarais, Odilon 

Dug-as et al, Hon. Calixte 
Aime 



Dugas, Hon. Calixte Aime 

Ellis, John 

Foley, Christopher 

Fontaine, Raphael E 

Forin, Peter Maclaren 

Fortin, Thomas 

Gorham, Thomas A 



Commissioner to act judicially in Extradition 
matters under the Extradition Act, within the 
Province of British Columbia 

A Judge of the Supreme Court of Judicature for 
Ontario, and a Justice of the High Court of 
Justice for Ontario 

A Member of the King's Bench Division of the 
High Court of Justice for Ontario 

A Sub- Collector in H. M. Customs 

A Preventive Officer in H. M. Customs 



Date 

of 

Commission. 



1901. 



Jan. 



28. 



1900. 



When 
Gazetted. 



1901. 

Feb. 2 



Dec. 



4. . . Jan. 19 



The Administrator of the Government of the 
Province of Quebec, for the purpose of opening 
the Session of the Legislature of the said Pro- 
vince Feb. 

A Commissioner to act judicially in Extradition! 
matters under 'The Extradition Act,' within I 
the Province of Quebec {July 20 . 



1901. 



April 28. 



Sept. 24, 



Oct. 
Nov. 



24. 

1 

18. 



A Member of the Council of the Yukon Territory. , Mar. 13 . 
A Police Magistrate in and for the North-westr 
Territories Jan. 21 . 



A Puisne Judge of the Supreme Court of Canada. 

A Puisne Judge of the Superior Court in and for 

the Province of Quebec 



Commissioners per Dedimus Potestatem within 
the Yukon Territory 



Gouin, Ernest 

Gregory, Hon. Geo. Frederick 



A Member of the Council of the Yukon Territory 



A Sub-Collector in H. M. Customs 

Commissioner to investigate, &c., re Chinese and 

Japanese Immigration into Canada 

A Puisne Judge of the Superior Court in and for 

the Province of Quebec 

Deputy Judge of the County Court of Kootenay, 

in the Province of British Columbia 

A Local Judge of the Supreme Court of British 

Columbia .... , 

A Judge of the Superior Court of the Province of 

Quebec 

Judge of the County Court of the County of 

Halton, Ont 

A Local Judge of the High Court of Justice for 

Ontario 

A Preventive Officer in H. M. Customs 

Judge of the Court of Divorce and Matrimonial 

Causes, N. B 



Sept. 25. 
June 25 . 

.Ian. 28. 

1898. 
Oct. 7. 

1901. 
Oct. 1. 

8. 

15. 



Jan. 



May 



Sept. 28 

28 
Oct. 26 
Nov. 23 



Feb. 16 
Aug. 3 



Feb. 2 

Sept. 28 

June 29 

Feb. 2 



Oct. 
Jan. 



April. 


9.. 


April 


20 


.. 


9.. 


" 


20 


Sept. 


25.. 


Oct. 


5 


Nov. 


27.. 


Dec. 


7 


Jan. 


27.. 
19.. 


Feb. 


7 
16 


Oct. 


3.. 


Nov. 


9 



37 



38 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
List of Public Officers to whom Commissions have issued during the p«'ist year (1901). 



Name. 



Gwynne, Hon. John Welling- 
ton 

Henderson, Alexander 

Hodder, John Frederick 

Home et al, David .... . . 

Hutton, William Alfred 

Killam et al, Hon. Albert 
Clements 

King, Laurence 

Lacoste, Kt., et al, Hon. Sir 
Alexandre 

Langdon, Joseph Franklin. . . 
Leamy, Andrew 

II M . 

tl It 

Liddell, James William 

Lount, K.C., William 

II II ..... 

II II 

Lount, K.C., Hon. William . 
Macauley, Charles Daniel . . . 

Macdonald, John A 

Macfarlane, David Robert. . . 

Martel, Louis 

McColl ct al, Hon. Angus 
John 

McColl, Hon. Angus John. . . 

McDonald et al, Hon. James. 

McDonongh, George Ruf us . . 
McGee, John Joseph 

McKay, S. G 

McKenna, James Andrew Jo- 
seph 

McPherson, George G 

McPherson, Joseph 



Office or Appointment. 



The Deputy of the Governor General for the i)ur- 
pose of opening the Session of Parliament of 
Canada on the 6th day of February, 1901 ' 

Judge of the County Court of Vancouver, B. C. . . 

A Local Judge of the Supreme Court of British 
Columbia 

A Commissioner of Police within a portion of the 
Province of Ontario . 

Commissioners to investigate, &c., re Inspection 
of Grain at the Port of Montreal 

A Sub-Collector in H. M. Customs 



Commissioners per Dedimus Potestatem within the 
Province of Manitoba 

A Police Magistrate in the North-west Territories, 
with jurisdiction in and for the Town of Moose- 
jaw 



Date 

of 

Commission. 



1901. 



Feb. 
June 



Jan. 
Oct, 



Commissioners per Dedimus Potestatem within the 
Province of Quebec 

A Sub-Collector in H. M. Customs 

Judge of the County Court of Kootenay, B. C 

A Local Judge of the Supreme Court of British 
Columbia 

Judge of the County Court of Yale, B.C 

Junior Judge of the County Court of the United 
Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry, 
Ont 

A Local Judge of the High Court of Justice for 
Ontario 

A Judge of the Supreme Court of Judicature for 
Ontario 

A Member of the Common Pleas Division of the 
High Court of Justice for Ontario , 

A Justice of the High Court of Justice for On 
tario 

A Commissioner to investigate, &c., re Claims of 
Messrs. J. and C. Noble 

Police Magistrate for Dawson, in the Yukon Ter- 
ritory, with jurisdiction throughout the said 
Territory , 

Judge of the City Court of the City of Charlotte- 
town, P.E.I 

A Justice of the Peace in and for the Yukon 
Territory 

A Sub-Collector in H. M. Customs 



Commissioners per Dedimus Potestatem within the 
Province of British Columbia 

The Administrator of the Government of the Pro- 
vince of British Columbia during the absence 
on leave of the Lieutenant-Governor 

Commissioners per Dedimus Potestatem with the 
Province of Nova Scotia 

A Sub-Collector in H. M. Customs 

A Commissioner per Dedimus Potestatem within 
the Dominion of Canada 

Deputy Judge of the County Court of the County 
of Oxford, Ont 



Sole Commis.sioner to investigate and deal with 
certain Half-breed Claims m the Province of 
Manitoba 

Deputy Judge of the County Court of the County 
of Perth, Ont 

A Collector in H. M. Customs 



Jan. 



April 



Jan. 28. 



June 


25.. 


Aug. 


10 


Jan. 
Oct. 
June 


28.. 

1.. 

13.. 


Feb. 
Nov. 
June 


2 

2 

22 


Oct. 


13.. 
31.. 


Nov. 


22 

16 


Jan. 


2. 


Jan. 


12 


.. 


2. 


" 


12 


II 


30.. 


Feb. 


9 


.. 


30.. 


.. 


9 


II 


30,. 


II 


9 


Aug. 


22.. 


Aug. 


24 


May 


31.. 


June 


15 


June 


29.. 


July 


20 


Jan. 
Oct. 


26.. 
1.. 


Feb. 
Oct. 


2 
26 



28. 



Jan. 
Oct. 


28.. 
1., 


Feb. 
Oct. 


Jan. 


28.. 


Feb. 


Feb. 


16.. 


•• 


Mar. 


16.. 


April 


Oct. 


29., 
22.. 


Oct. 



When 
Gazetted. 



1901. 



Feb. 
June 



Jan. 
Oct. 



Feb. 



Feb. 



April 



COMMISSIONS TO PUBLIC OFFICERS 39 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 
List of Public Officers to whom Commissions have issued during the past year (1901). 



Name. 



McLeod, Alexander. 



McMurray, James. 



Paradis, K.C., Einilien Z. . 

Patterson, Henry William . 
Pelletier, E. Albert 



Perry, Frederick C . 



Power, Hon. Lawrence Geof- 

f i-ey 

Pugh, William Alexander , . 
Richardson et al, Hon. Hugh 



Rochon, Alfred 



Ross, Ja'Ties Hamilton . . 
Snider, Thomas Alpheus 



Office or Appointment. 



Commissioner under 'The Franchise Act, 1878, 
re Voters' List for Electoral District of Lisgar, 
Man 



A Preventive Officer in H. M. Customs 



A Puisne Judge of the Superior Court of the 

Province of Quebec . . 

A Clerk in H. M. Customs . . 

An Inspector in the North-west Mounted Police 



A Collector in H. M. Customs. 



Strong ct al, Hon. Sir Samuel 
Henry 



The Speaker of the Senate of Canada 

A Sub-Collector in H, M. Customs 

Commissioners per Dedimus Potestatem within the 

North-west Territories 

A Puisne Judge of the Superior Court in and for 

the Province of Quebec 

The Commissioner of the Yukon Territory . . . 
Deputy Judge of the Coufity Court of the County 

of Haldimand, Ont , 

Deputy Judge of the County Court of the County 

c f Haldimand, Ont 



Sullivan ct al, Hon. William 
Wilfrid 

Taschereau, Hon. Henri 
Thomas 



Taylor, George L 



Trenholme, Norman William 
Tuck et al, Hon. Wm, Henry 
Valin, Joseph Alphonse 



Walkem, Hon. George A . . 



Wallace, William Bernard. . . 

Walton, Egerton Joseph Ro- 
bert 

West, Christopher Harfield. . 



Wood, Zachary Taylor. 



Woodruff, David W 
Yule, Andrew 



Commissioners per Dedimus Potestatem within the 
Dominion of Canada 



Commissioners per Dedimus Potestatem within the 
Province of Prince Edward Island 



J vine 



Commissioner to inquire into, &c., re alleged 
combine among Canadian Paper Manufac- 
turers 

Police Magistrate for White Horse, in the Yukon 
Territory, with jurisdiction throughout the said 
Territory 

A Puisne Judge of the Superior Court in and for 
the Province of Quebec 

Commissioners per Dedimus Potestatem within the 
Province of New Brunswick 

A Surrogate Judge in Admiralty of the Exchequer 
Court for the Provisional Judicial District of 
Nipissing, Ont June 

Administrator of the Government of British Col-j 
unibia during the absence on leave of the Lieu- 
tenant-Governor , April 

Judge of the County Court of District No. 1,; 
County of Halifax, N.S ». . . . jJan. 



Date 

of 

Commission. 



1901. 



Nov. 16. 

1900. 
Dec. 24. 

1901. 

Sept. 14. 
Jan. 25. 
Jan. 1 . 

1900. 

Dec. 1. 



1901. 



Jan. 
Oct. 

Jan. 



June 25 . 
March 11 . 



May 

Aug. 

Jan. 



27. 
29. 

28. 

28. 



April 25. 



25. 



Jan. 28. 



20. 



A Sub-Collector in H. M, 

Commissicmer of Police 

Territories 



Customs 

within the North-west 



A Member of the Council of the Yukon Territory 



A Preventive Officer in H. M. Customs 
A Sub-Collector in H, M. Customs 



Oct. 
•Jan. 



19. 



1900. 
July 31 
1901. 



Mar. 

April 



When 
Gazetted. 



1901. 

Nov. 16 
Jan. 19 



Sept. 28 
April 27 
Mar. 30 



Jan. 5 

Feb. 2 

Nov. 2 

Feb. 2 

June 29 

April 13 

June 8 

Aug. 31 

Feb. 2 

2 

May 4 

June 15 

29 

Feb. 2 

July 6 

April 27 

Jan. 12 

Nov. 2 

Jan. 12 



April 20 
Oct. 26 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDOUARD VII, A. 1902 



appe:n^dix b. 

Alphabetical List of the Foreign Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and Com- 
mercial Agents in the Dominion, according to the latest informa'ion supplied to 
the Secretary of State. 



Name. 



Adams, A. W ... 

Aitken, W. H 

Albinana y Martinez 

Albro, H." W '.'.'.'.'.' '. 

Alexander, J. I 

Alexander, R. H . . . . 

Allison, F. F 

Anderson, G. B 

Ansell, D. A 

Armstrong, E, H 

Arnold, F. W 

Auger, Jacques 

Authier, J. M . . . . 
Auzias-Turenne, R. . 

Baby F. W 

Bain, A 

Balcer, G 

Baicer, G 

Bate, H. A 

Bartels, F 

Bedell, J. V...... . 

Bedell, O 

Beebe, H. S 

Bell, C. N 

Bell, F. J 

Benedict, J. S . . . 

Bentley, W. D 

Berg, Rev. B. O.... 

Beringer, J. F 

Bettinger, J, R 

Biglow, E 

Bill, E. M 

Binet, S 

Bisson, D 

Black, H. C 

Blair, D 

Boach, S 

Boardman, C. A 

Boissevain, C. D. W. 

Bolte, A 

Bopp, F 

Borlase, G. E 

Bouillon, E. A. A. . . 

Braman, W. W 

Brinckman, H . . . 
Brodett, M, J. Quin- 

tana, Y 

Brophy, H 

Brown, E. C 

Brush, H. W 

Buckly, Jas 

Buetelspacher, C 

Burchell, J. E 

Burchell, J. E 

Burgess, J. G 




Consular Agent. 

II II 
Consul 



Consul General 

Vice and Deputy Consul. 

Deputy Consul 

Acting Consular Agent , 

Commercial Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 



Vice-Consul. 



Vice and Deputy Com. Agent. 

Vice and Deputy Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Consular Agent . . . 

Commercial Agent 

Vice-Consul 



Consular Agent. 
Consul General. 
Consular Agent. 



Vice-Consul 

Acting Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Commercial Agent. . . , 

Consul General 

Consular Agent 

Consul 9 

Vice and Deputy Consul. 

Commercial Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Acting Consul 



Consul General 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul. 

Consul . . . 

Vice-Consul 



United States. 



Peru 

Portugal 

United States. 

Mexico 

United States 
II 

Italy 

United States 

France 

United States 



France , . . 

Sweden and Norway. 

Belgium 

United States 



Montreal, Que 

Megantic, Que ... . 
Campobello Is'd,N.B 
Vancouver, B.C. . . . 

St. John, N.B 

Prescott, Ont 

Montreal, Que 

Yarmouth, N.S 

Dawson City, Y.T.. 
Qviebec, Que ...... 

St. Hyacinthe, Que. 
Dawson City, Y.T.. 
Courtwright, Ont . . . 
Port Hawkesbury 
and Mulgrave, N.S 
Three Rivers, Que.. 

Ottawa, Ont . . . 

St. Hyacinthe, Que. 
Fort Erie, Ont 



Guatemala . . . 
United States 



Brazil 

Sweden and Norway. 
United States 



Sweden and Norway. 



Urugiiay 

United States 
Netherlands , . 
France .... , . 
Germany. . . 
United States 

Brazil . . . , 

United States 
Germany 



Lineboro', Que 

Winnipeg, Man 

Peterborough, Ont. . 
Campbellton, N.B.. 

Halifax, N.S 

Rat Portage, Ont . . , 

Picton, Ont 

Montreal, Que .... 

Kingsport, N.S 

Shelburne, N.S 

Arichat, N.S 

Paspebiac, Que 

Pugwash, N.S 

Chicoutimi, Que 

Halifax, N.S 

Rimouski, Que 

Montreal, Que.. 

Toronto, Ont 

Montreal, Que. . 
Sherbrooice, Que . . . 

Paspebiac, Que 

jThree Rivers, Qae . . 
Winnipeg, Man 



Consular Agent. 



Spain Montreal, Que. . . 

Guatemala Montreal, Que .... 

United States. . 'Nelson, B.C 

II [Niagara Falls, Ont. 

II ... I Prescott, Ont 

IMoncton, N.B 

Sweden and Norway. I Sydney, N.S 

United States | n 

ICheverie, N.S 



1901 
1899 
1887 
1895 
1878 
1900 
1888 
1894 
1901 

1898 
1898 
1882 

188G 

1875 
1889 
1882 
1900 
1897 
1893 
1897 
1897 
1897 
1882 
1901 
1888 
1897 
1901 
1901 
1899 
1889 
1892 
1898 
1879 
1897 
1895 
1892 
1898 
1899 
1899 
1891 
1896 

1901 
1899 
1901 

1899 
1876 
1898 
1881 
1897 
1899 



I 



FOREIGN CONSULS, VICE-CONSULS, CONSULAR AGENTS, ETC. 41 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

Alphabetical List of the Foreign Consuls, V ice-Consuls, Consular Agents and 
Commercial Agents, &c. — Continued. 



Name. 



Burke, M. J 

Burroughs, G. H 

Burwasb, A 

Butler, R 

Butterfield, B. F.... 

Call, R. C 

Campbell, Wm 

Carbray, Felix. .... 

Carlton, C. C 

Carney, M 

Carpenter, C. B. K . . 

Carter, A. T 

Carter, J 

Carter, M. J 

Champion, C. P 

Chester, A 

Chipmau, H. L 

Churchill, E 

Clinton, G. W 

Colcock, N. B 

Collard, L. H. . . . 
Corbett, Fred. . . , 

Coutlee, J. L 

Creighton, J. W 

Creswicke, E. H 

Crockett, J. T .... 

Culver, H. S 

Curren, A. E 

Dale, Geo. N 

Daly, C. N 

Davidson, A. F 

Davidson, C. H 

Davies, J. R 

Davies, J. R 

Davison, E. D 

Davison, Francis. . . . 

Day, Geo. 

Deal,C 

De Bury, Count R . . 

De Bury, Count R . . 

DeBury, L. Visart. . 

Denison, F. C 

De Struve, N . ... 

De St. Laurent, Bar- 
on H 

De Vos, E. R 

Dickson, A. F 

Dill, H. P 

Dingman, W.S 

Dineen, J 

Dobson, G. H 

Donaghy, J 

Donner, E 

Dorman, J. S 

Dorsey, W. H 

Downer, F. W . , . . 

Dubuc, A. J. H 

Duchastel, de Mont 
rouge 

Dwyer, C 

Dwyer, C 

Eastman, C. M 

Ferguson, D. P 

Ferrera, A. A 

Fisher, Cavalier G.G. 

Flack, D. A 

Flockhart, A. R 



Designation. 



Country. 



Consul United States. 

Vice-Consul §P^.^"- 

Consiilar Agent , 

Vice and Deputy Consul.. 
Consular Agent 



Vice Consular Agent 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul . . . 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent. ....... 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul. 

Honorary Consul 

Consular Agent 



Vice and Deputy Consul. 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul. 



Consul 

Commercial Agent 

Consular Agent 

I Vice and Deputy Consul. 
Consul 



Vice-Consul .... 

Consul 

Vice-Consul.. . . 
Consular Agent. 
Vice-Consul 



Consul . 



Consular Agent. 
Vice-Consul... . . 
Consul 



Acting Consul General. 
Consul , 



V. & D. Com. Agent. 
Consular Agent 



V. & D. Consul. 
Consul General . 
Consular .\gent. 

Vice-Consul 



Acting Consul General . . . . 
Honorary Consular Agent . 
Consular Agent 



Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

V. & D. Com. Agent 
Vice Com. Agent 



United States. 



Portugal 

United States. 

Haiti 

Portugal 

France 

United States. 



Argentine Republic. 

United States 

Austria-Hungary . . . 
United States 



Sweden and Norway. 

Monaco, Princ'lity of 

Brazil 

United States 



Belgium I 

United States ' 

Argentine Republic! 



Sweden and Norway. | 

Ignited States 

Uruguay 

Portugal , 

Chile 

United States. . . . 

Belgium 

France 

Denmark ... 

United States 

Russia 



Residence. 



Port Stanley and St. 

Thomas, Ont 

Quebec, Que 

Arnprior, Ont 

Hamilton, Ont. . . . 

Stanstead, Que 

Newcastle, N.B 

Goderich, Ont 

Quebec, Que 

Souris, P.E.I. ... 

Halifax, N.S 

Gaspe Basin, Que. . . 

Gaspe, Que 

Gaspe Basin, Que. . . 

Yarmouth, N.S 

Quebec, Que 

Port Sarnia, Ont .... 

Halifax, N.S 

iLockiKu-t, N.S 

Cumberland, B C... 
Niagara Falls, Ont. . 
St. Catharines, Ont.. 
St. Margaret's Bay, 

N.S 

Montreal, Que 

Halifax, N.S 

Barrie, Ont 

Charlottetown, P.E.I 

London, Ont 

Halifax, N.S 

Coaticooke, Que 

Guelph, Ont 

Lunenburg, N.S 

Bridgewater, N.S . . . 
Pictou,N.S 



• When 
i Appointed 



France 

Belgium 

L^nited States . 



Germany .... 
United States . 

Belgium 

United States. 



Bridgewater, N.S. . .! 



Montreal, Que. 
St. John, Que. . 
St. John, N.B. 



Woodstock, N.B. 
Montreal, Que . . . 



Belgium . 



Vancouver, B, C . . . . 

Ottawa, Ont 

Gaspe Basin, Que . . . 

Port Hope, Ont 

Stratford, Ont 

Huntingdon, Que . . . 

Sydney, N S 

St. Johns, Que 

Ottawa, Ont 

Potton, Que 

North Portral, NWT 
Lethbridge, N.W.T. 
Winnipeg, Man 



France 

Austria Hungary. . . . 

Germany 

United States 

Sweden and Norway 
Italy 



Montreal, Que. 
Pictou, N.S.... 



United States . 



Waterloo, Que 

North port, N.S 

Vancouver, B.C 

Halifax, N.S 

Cornw^ill, Ont 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 



1897 
1896 
1901 
1898 
1897 
1866 
1883 

1880 
1880 
1895 
1891 
1890 
1901 
1892 
1900 
1896 
1901 
1899 
1900 
1875 

1901 

1898 
1899 
1895 
1890 
1S97 
1889 
1901 
1893 
1898 
1888 
1884 
1897 
1901 
1881 
1897 
1897 
1899 
1901 
1900 
1897 
1900 

1899 
1901 
1887 
1900 
1899 
1895 
1880 
1890 
1899 
1901 
1895 
1899 
1901 

1900 
1882 
1891 
1901 
1886 
1901 
1891 
1901 
1895 



.42 



DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 Eu,,/nriD VII., A. 1902 



Alphabetical List of the Foreign Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and Com- 
mercial Agents, &c. — Continued. 



Name. 



Designation. 



V. &D. Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul General .... 
Consular Agent 



Vice-Consul 



I Consular Agent, 



Vice-Consul .... 

Consul 

Consular Agent . 
Vice-Consul . . . . 



Folger, M. H.... 

Foot, W. R 

Fo.ster, J. G 

Franklyn, G. E . . 
Fraser, W. A. . 

Fraser, A Vice-Consul 

Fraser, G. B Consular Agent 

Frechette, O Vice-Consul . . , 

Frechette, O !Consul 

Frisbee G. C Consular Agent 

Gagne, J. A Vice-Consul ... 

Gautier, F Consular Agent 

Gibson, J. S. . . 

Gilbert G 

Gillis, J. A.... 
Given, W. F. . 

Glidden, A 

Goodwin, A. 1) Consul 

Gordon, Wm . . . iVice-Consul 

Gorman, P | .. and Dep. Consul General 

Graham, J i n Consul 

Graham, W. H jConsul 

Grant, Mc$^ .... 

Green, J. A 

Gunsaulus, E, N. 
Guy, J. A... . 
Gylling, G. E. .. 
Haddow, Geo . . . 

Hall, Wm 

Hamilton, J. E.. 
Hanright, F. G.. 
Harcourt, John . 
Hardy, A. C... 
Hart, A. W . . . . 
Hastings, G. M. 
Hendrick, M. J . 
Henshaw, F. C. 
Henry, W. W . 
Herron, A. M , . 
Hertzberg, A. L 

Hespeler, W i Consul 

Heward, S. B i Vice-Consul 

Hill, Geo I ,, and Dep. Consul General 

Hillary, N. T. M . . . i Consular Agent 

Hillier, E | Vice-Consul 

Hofstrand, C. O . . . . 1 „ 

Hoke, J. T ^Consul 

Hoke, L. H Consular Agent 

Hough, F. A . ... I Vice and Deputy Consul 

Hume, W. W Consular Agent . . . 

Hunt, R I „ 

Hunter, B. A Vice and Deputy Consul 

Hutchinson, R i n Consul 

Hutchison, E.. . 

Inglis, Jas 

Jack, D. R . . 
Jackson, C. B. . 
Jackson, John 
Jarvis, C. E. L 
Jarvis, C. W. . . 



Country. 



United States. 



France 

United States 

Sweden and Norway, 
Spain 



Chile 

United States 

Sweden and Norway, 

France . . . . 

United States 

Sweden and Norway, 

United States 



Uruguay . . . . 
United States. 



II and Deputy Consul 

Commercial Agent 

Vice-Consul 

11 and Deputy Consul 
Consular Agent , 



Vice and Dep. Com. Agent. 
Consul - 



Consular Agent. 
Vice-Consul . . . . 



Germany 

Sweden and Norway. 
United States 



Sweden and Norway. 

II . . 

United States 



Italy 

United States. 



United States 

Argentine Republic. 
United States 



Residence. 



Kingston, Ont 

Parry Sound, Ont. 
Halifax. N. S 



Grand Manan, N.B 

Matane, Q\ie 

Chatham, N.B 

Quebec, Que. ..:... 



II and Dep. Com. Agent. 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Jarvis, M. M Commercial Agent 

Jewett, L. M . . .Vice and Deputy Consul 

Johnson, F. S. S. . . . Commercial Agent 

Johnson, G. G Vice-Consul 

Jones, W.G | „ 

Joseph, A. C jConsul 

Joseph, J II 

Ju[>p, R. H Vice and Dep. Consul. . . . 



Sweden and Norway. 

Germany 

Netherlands 

United, States 



Portugal 

Sweden and Norway. 
United States 



Sweden and Norway. 



Spain 

United States. 



Brazil 

United States. 
Brazil ... 
United States. 
United States. 
Netherlands . . 

Spain 

Belgium 



Rat Portage, Ont. . . . 

Chicoutimi 

Winnipeg, Man 

Chemainus, B.C ... 

Bathurst, N.B 

Ship Harbour, N.S. . 

Cookshire, Que 

Alberton, P.E.I .... 

St. John, N.B 

Chatham, Ont. . . . . . 

Montreal, Que 

Woodstock, N.B 

Winnipeg, Man . . , . 

Halifax, N.S 

Winnipeg, Man 

Toronto, Ont 

Edniundston, N.B.. 

Montreal, Que 

Dalhousie, N.B.. . . 

Winnipeg, Man 

Cornwall, Ont 

Halifax, N.S 

Port Hope, Ont 

Brantford, Ont 

Cape Canso, N.S 

Stanbridge, Que 

Belleville, Ont 

Montreal, Que .... 

Quebec, Que 

iDeloraine, Man 

Toronto, Ont 

Winnipeg, Man 

Montreal, Que . . 

Halifax, N.S 

Sudbury, Ont 

St. Etienne, Que . . . 

Nya, Stockholm 

Windsor, N.S 

Parrsboro', N. S 

Amherstburg, Ont . 

Paris, Ont 

Summerside, P.E.I. . 

Victoria, B.C 

Richibucto, N.B 

Chatham, N.B 

Shediac, N.B 

St. John, N.B...... 

Wallaceburg, Ont. . . 

Rossland, B.C 

St. John, N.B 

Fort William. Ont.. 
St. John, N.B 



United States. 



When 
Appointed 



Stanbridge, Que . 
Vancouver, B.C . 
Halifax, N.S ... . 

Quebec, Que 

Montreal, Que. . 
Orillia, Ont 



FOREIGN CONSULS, VICE-CONSULS, CONSULAR AGENTS, ETC. 43 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

Alphabetical List of the Foreign Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and 
Commercial Agents, &c. — Continued. 



Name. 



Kilmaster, G. B 
Kimber, F. C... 
King, W. H.... 



Kingsmill, N 

Kleczkowski, A . . 
Knowlson, J. M . 

Lang, P 

Laird, J 

Lamontagne, T, J. 

Laurence B . 

Laurence, E 

Law, B. B 

Lawson, W 

LeBou tiller, 0. S.. 
Ledoux, U. J . . . 

Leet, L. T 

Leet, L. T 

LeGros, P. E. ... 

Leniieux, R 

Leprohon, C. de B. 
Leprohon, J. L., . . 

Levasseur, N 

Levasseur, N.. . . 
Levatte, H. C, V.. 
Le Quesne, J. C. . 
Little, J. M.-.. .. 
Lowenberg, C. ... 

Mack, J. M 

Maguire, J. A ... 
Maguire, J. A. . . . 
Martin, C. W. . . . 
Martiney, J. A. . . . 
Mathers, H. I. ... 

Mathers, H. I 

Mathers, H. I 

Mathys, F. B 

Mazza, Count F. . . 

Meek, W. A 

Merriman, C. W . . 

Meyer, C. C 

Meyer, R. H 

Millener, P]. A.. . 

Milliken, E 

Minchin, D. J 

Mitchell, W. A.... 

Moffat, Wm 

Monteith, C. E.... 
Moody, E. W. B.. 

Morang, G. N 

Morris, C. W 



Designation. 



Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul 



Consul , . 

M General . 
Consular Agent . 

Consul 

Vice- Consul . . . 



Consul 

Vice-Consul . , 

Acting Vice-Consul . 
Consular Agent .... 
Consular Agent . . . 

Consul 

Consular Agent 



Commercial Agent. 

Consul . . 

Vice-Consul 

Commercial Agent . 

Vice-Consul 

Consul . 

Consular Agent . 

Vice-Consul 

V. and D. Consul . 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul General . . . 
Consul 



Vice-Consul , 



Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General 

Vice Commercial Agent 

Cousul 

Vice-Consul 



Consular Agent 
I Vice-Consul .... 



Morris, H. C . 
Morris, M. P. 



Consular Agent 

Consul 

Vice-Consul ... 

Consul 

Consular Agent. 

Consul 



Morris, M. P 

Morrison, A 

Moseley, F 

Mott, W. A 

Mullins, B. C . . . . 

IVLurray, T. O 

Murray, C 

Musson, Geo 

Myers, I. B 

MacCuaig, R. C. W. 
Macdonald, A. A.. . . 

MacLean, D 

Maclure, J. C 



Consul Genei-al . . 

Consul 

Consular Agent . 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent . 



Vice Commercial Agent. 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul . 

Consular Agent 

Vice.Consul 



Country. 



United States 

Brazil 

United States. 

Argentine Republic. 

France 

United States 

Peru 

Sweden and Norway. 
Venezuela 

Sweden and Norway 
Argentine Republic. 

Italy ^ 

United States 

Nicaragua 

Peru 

Brazil , 

Columbia 

Brazil 

Guatemala 

United States 

Portugal 

United States 

Germany 

United States 

Argentine Republic. . 

Uruguay 

United States 

Spain 

Russia 

Sweden and Norway 

Denmark 

Belgium 

Italy 

United States 

Denmark 

Sweden and Norway 
United States 

Ecuador 

Mexico 

United States 

Argentine Republic. . 

Guatemala 

United States. 

Nicaragua, Republic 

of , 

Chili 

Germany 

France 

Sweden and Norway 
United States 

Brazil 

United States 

Sweden and Norway 

France 

Sweden and Norway 



Residence. 



When 
Appointed 



Port Rowan, Ont.. 

Sydney, N.S 1 

Port Stanley and St, 

Thomas, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Montreal, Que 

Lindsay, Ont 

Sherbrooke, Que .... 

Quebec, Que 

St. Anne, Que . , . . 

Toronto, Ont 

Montreal, Que 

Yarmouth, N.S 

Halifax, N.S., 

Gaspe Basin, Que.. . 
Three Rivers, Que. . 
Montreal 



Gaspe, Que 

Montreal, Que 



Quebec, Que. 



Louisbourg, N.S. . . 

Paspebiac, Que 

Windsor, Ont 

Victoria, B.C 

Liverpool, N.S. . . . 

Quebec, Que 

Montreal, Que .... 
Amherstburg, Ont. 

Montreal, Que 

Halifax, N.S 



Montreal, Qne. 



Port Rowan, Ont . . . 

Brockville, Ont 

Ottawa, Ont . . 

Minnesdoa, Man . . . . 

Deseronto, Ont 

St. George, N.B 

Berlin, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

River Hebert, N.S.. 

Chatham, Ont 

Yarmouth, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 

Pugwash & Wallace, 

N.S 

Windsor, Ont 



Vancouver, B.C. 



Chatham, N.B 

Sydney, N.S 

Campbellton, N.B. . . 

Bathurst, N.B 

Richibucto, N.B.... 
Campbellton, N.B. . . 

Toronto, Ont 

St. John, N.B 

Ottawa, Ont 

Charlottetown,P.E.I 
Sherbrooke, Que..., 
Victoria, B.C 



1894 
1884 

1887 
1887 
1894 
1894 
1897 
1875 
1875 
1886 
1886 
1895 
1889 
1894 
1897 
1899 
1900 
1900 
1892 
1899 
1900 
1894 
1897 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1891 
1896 
1883 
1883 
1897 
1901 
1899 
1895 
1895 
1892 
1901 
1894 
1898 
1893 
1896 
1890 
1898 
1898 
1901 
1899 
1897 
1899 
1897 

1888 
1899 

1899 
1897 

1872 
1892 
1888 
1893 
1901 
1897 
1889 
1897 
1882 
1901 
1885 
1901 



44 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDOUARD VII, A. 1902 

Alphabatical list of the "Foreign Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and 
Commercial Agents, &c. — Continued. 



Name. 



MacMillan, F 

MacQuillan, J . . . . 

McArthur, D 

McCook, J. C 

McCullough, C. A. . 
McDonald, A. J . . . 

McDonell, C 

McKeown, D, J 

McMillan, N 

Nalder, J 

Nicholls, F 

Nicholls, J. R 

Nolan, J. A 

Nordby, N. C. N... 

Nordheimer, A 

Nordheimer, S . 
Nosse, Tatszgoro . . . 
Ohlen, E 



Designation. 



Vice-Consul. . . . 
Consul General. 
Consular Agent. 
Consul . 



Consular Agent. 



Consul 

V. and D. Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent. . 
Vice-Consul . 



Consul 

Consul General 
Consul 



Ohlen, E 

Olmstead, F. A 

Oronhyatekha, Dr. . . 
Owen, D. M ...... 

Owen, J. M 

Owen, P. G 

Owen, W. H.. . . 
Oxley, F. H .. ... 

Oxley, H 

Oxnard. G. A 

Pace, S. D 

Pattison, A. O .... 

Patullo, T. D 

Poitras, Arthur 

Pollock, J. R 

Ponton, W. N . 

Pridhani, A ... 

Primrose, H . . . . . . 

Purves, J. D. A 

Quintana y Brodett. 

M. J 

Rae, G. M 

Read, J 

Reid, R 

Rey, D. L 

Reynolds, L. B 

Rigby, E. 

Rive, P 

Robertson, T. W. . . . 
Robertson, W. T. . . . 

Roller, H. T 

Ross, J. C 

Rosse, J. M 

Rouleau, E. H .... 

Routh, F. A 

Ryerson, Jas 

Sand renter, E 

Sanford, H. M 

Schetky, G. S 

Schmidt, A .-. . . 

Schofield, F 

Schultze, E 

Scott, J. G 

Sewell, R. L 

Sexton, J. P 

Sevfert, A. G 

Sharkey, J. T 

Shea. R. A 



Consular Agent 
Consul General. 
Consular Agent . 



Vice-Consul . 



Consular Agent . . . 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

V. and D. Consul. 

Consul 

Consular Agent . . 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent.. 



Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent. 

Vice-Consul 



Consul General 

Commercial Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul . 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul.. 



I Consular Agent. 

I 

i Vice-Consul.. . . 



Commercial Agent. 
Consul 



Country. 



Residence. 



Sweden and Norway Sheet Harbour, N. S. 

Ecuador Vancouver, B.C. ... 

United States Emerson, Man . . . . 

Dawson, Y.T 

St. Stephen, N.B.. . . 

Georgetown, P.E.I. . 

Collingwood, Ont . . 

North Bay, Ont 

Port Sarnia, Ont 

Windsor, N.S 

Liberia jToronto. Ont 

United States, j Hereford, Que . . . 

Sweden and Norway j Calgary, N W.T ... 

II It jParrsboro', N.S 

Netherlands jToronto, Ont 

Germany . 



Japan. 

Nicaragua, Republic 

of 

Peru , 

United States 

Liberia 

United States 



Sweden and Norway 



United States. 
Portugal 



Sweden and Norway 
United States 



Montreal. Que. 



Sutton Que. . . . . . . 

Toronto, Ont 

Lunenburg, N. S . .-. 

Annapolis, N.S 

St. Thomas de Mont- 

magny. Que 

Bridgewater, N.S... 
Halifax, N.S 



United States Guelph, Ont. . . . 

United States Port Sarnia, Ont . 

Clinton, Ont 

Dawson, Y. T... 
Arthabaska, Que . 

II IFernie, B. C 

! Belleville, Ont... 

II [Grenville, Que. . . 

in iPictou, N.S 

jSydney, N.S 



Spain j 

Brazil i 

Sweden and Norway I 

United States. \ 

Switzerland . . | 

United States 

Sweden and Norway] 

ti II 
United States 



Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul Gen. 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul 

Honorary Consul General . . 

Vice-Consul . 

Vice and Deputy Consul 

Consul General 

Consul . 

Consular Agent 



Sweden and Norway 
United States. ... 

Belgium 

Portugal 

United States 

Switzerland 

United States. . . . 

Denmark 

United States. . . . 

Austria-Hungary 

Uruguay 

United States 

Greece 

United States 



Montreal, Que. . . . . 

Toronto, Ont 

Baie Verte, N.B.... 

London, Ont. 

Montreal, Que 

Algoma, Ont 

LittleGlace Bay , N. S. 
Caraquet, N.B .... 
Barrington, N.S . . . 
Owen Sound, Ont. . . 

Dawson, Y.T 

Buctouche, N.B . 

Chaudiere Jet., Que. 
Calgary, N.W.T.... 

Montreal, Que 

Gait, Ont 

Montreal, Que 

Ottawa, Ont 

Nanaimo, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man 

Vancouver, B.C 

Montreal, Que 

Chicoutimi, Que 

Toronto, Ont 

Montreal, Que 

Stratford, Ont 

Frederictcm, N.B — 
Palmerston, Ont 



When 
Appointed 



1882 
1898 
1889 
1898 
1897 
1883 
1899 
1894 
1898 
1897 
1887 
1870 
1901 
1886 
1889 
1889 
1901 
1900 
1899 
1900 
1900 
1901 
1883 
1872 

1898 
1872 
1898 
1901 
1883 
1890 
1890 
1900 
1887 
1901 
1885 
1879 
1869 
1899 

1901 
1900 
1897 
1899 
1891 
1891 
1886 
1884 
1892 
1894 
1900 
1878 
1898 
1889 



1892 
1898 
1898 
1890 
1899 
1899 
1885 
1898 
1899 
1897 
1894 
1899 



I 



FOREIGN CONSULS, VICE-CONSULS, CONSULAR AGENTS, ETC. 45 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

Alphabetical List of the Foreign Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and 
Commercial Agents, &c. — Continued. 




Shepard, J. M 

Shimidzu, S 

Shirley, J. H 

Shotts, G. W 

SxUhII, Wm 

Smith, A. E 

Smith, Dr. Harley.. 

Smith, R. T 

Smith, T. R 

Snowball, Hon J. B. 

Stapleton, T 

Steeves, C. A 

Stericker, W. P 

Stewart, McL 

Stewart, W. B 

Stickney, G. H 

Stocking, F. S .... 
St. Laurent, Baron de 

Struve, N. de 

Sturton, A 

Sturton, A 

Sylvestre, I 

St. Pierre, A 

Taylor, EC 

Templeton, Wm . . . 
Thibeaudo, J. H . . . . 

Thomas, O. J 

Thompson, J. E 

Thomson, J. H 

Thomson, P. W 

Thomson, R 

Topping, J 

Topping, J 

Turner, C. E 

Turner, R 

Twitchell, M. H... 

Vail, D. J 

Valverde, M 

Vroom, C. N 

Wade, F. B 

Wakefield, E. A... 

Wanklvn, F. L 

Ward, W. A 

Wark, W. W 

Wacerous, C. A 

Watt, G 

Wensky, W 

West, G.N 

White, R. F .... 
Whitehead, J. W... 
Whitehead, J.W... 
Whitman, T. S. ... 

Wiekwire, Dr. W.. . . 

Williams, F 

Wilson, A 

Winkler, E 

Wolff, H. H 

Wood, W. W 

Worden, I. G. . . 

Wulffsohm, J 

Wurtele, E. F 

Wurtele, E. F 

Young, S. J 



. . ! Consul 



Commercial Agent. 

II II 
Consul 



Consular Agent . 
Consul 



United States. 

Japan 

United States. 



Consular Agent 

Consular Agent .... . 
Vice and Deputy Com. 
Consular Agent ...... 

Vice Consul 

Consular Agent 



Italy 

Sweden and Norway 

Belgium 

France 

United States 



Agent 



Hamilton, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C. . . . 
Goderich, Ont .... 
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 
Collingwood, Ont, . . 

Victoria, B.C 

Toronto, Ont 

Victoria, B.C 



Vice-Consul 
Consul 



Vice-Consul . 



Consular Agent 

Vice and Deputy Com. 
Consular Agent 



Agent 



Vice-Consul. 



Consul 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul.. ... 

Consul General 

Vice Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul General 

Vice and Deputy Consul, 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 



{Consular Agent. . 

Vice-Consul. 

j Consular Agent. . . 
Consul 



Consular Agent. 
Vice-Consul . . . . 



iVice and Deputy Consul 
Consular Agent.. 



Consul ....... 

i Vice-Consul. . . 
Consular Agent . 
Consul.. , 
Vice-Consul. . . . 



Chatham, N.B 

Coteau, Que 

Moncton, N.B 

II Oshawa, Ont 

Brazil Ottawa, Out 

United States . jDigby, N.S 

II St. Andrews, N.B. . . 

II ..... Quebec, Que 

France ; Vancouver, B.C 

Russia jMontreal, Que 

Sweden and Norway Chicoutimi, Que 

Portugal . . I II II 

United States Sorel, Que 

II Rimouski, Que 

II I Clarence ville, Que. . . 

II ... . iNapanee, Ont 

11 Wiarton, Ont. . . . . . 

Italy St. John, N.B 

Spain Toronto, Ont 

Sweden and Norway St. John, N.B 

Austria-Hungary. . . . | h 

Germany n 

France . Escoumains, Que . . . 

Sweden and Norway 1 n n .... 

United States Ottawa, Ont 

Mexico iQuebec, Que 

United States 1 Kingston, Ont .... 

United States Charlottetown.P.E.I 

Ecuador Ottawa, Ont 

United States St. Stephen, N.B. . . 

Sweden and Norway. Bridgewater, N.S. . . 

United States Orillia. Ont 

Argentine Republic. Montreal, Que 

Denmark Victoria, B.C. 

United States. .... jHemmingford, Que. 

Chile Brantford, Ont 

Italy. . . IChatham, N.B 

Germany Dawson, Y.T 

United States Sydney, N.S 

jMidland, Ont 

Belgium Vancouver, B.C 

Sweden and Norway. ! h 

Portugal Annapolis andDigbv, 

N.S :. 

Netherlands Halifax, N.S \ 

United States iCoaticooke, Que. ... 

Germany I Pugwash, N.S 

United States j Gretna, Man 

Denmark i Montr^^al, Que 



United States. 



Germany 

; Denmark 

Sweden and Norway, 



[Consular Agent U^nited States. 



Brock ville, Ont .... 
Wallaceburg, Ont. . . 

Vancouver, B.C 

Quebec, Que 

Trenton, Ont | 



1897 
1898 
1902 
1898 
1899 
1897 
19C1 
1900 
1892 

1896 
1901 
1896 
1882 
1873 
1892 
1898 
1899 
1900 

1893 
1893 
1901 
1900 
1888 
1899 
1886 
1900 
1885 
1899 
1878 
1891 
1886 
1897 
1900 
1878 
1897 
1900 
1895 
1882 
1900 
1888 
1896 
1885 
1886 
1K86 
1900 
1897 
1900 
1897 
1901 

1889 
1886 
1901 
1874 
1893 
1893 
1893 
1886 
1895 
1899 
1899 
1891 



46 



DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



APPE:NrDIX B (2). 

Alphabetical List of Foreign Countries represented in Canada by Consuls, Vice-Consuls, 
Consular Agents and Commercial Agents, according to the latest information 
supplied to the Secretary of State. 



Country. 



Argentine Republic. 



Place. 



Austria- Hungary. . . 
Belgium 



Brazil 



Chile. 



Columbia. 
Denmark . 



IBridgewater, N.S. 

Halifax, N.S 

Lunenburg, N.S.. . 
Montreal, Que 



Quebec, Que. 



St. John, N.B... 
Toronto, Ont . . . . 
i Yarmouth, N.S. . 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que . . . 

Pictou, N.S 

St. John, N.B... 
Calgary, N.W.T. 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que . . . 



Ecuador , 
France. . 



Name. 



Ottawa. Ont. 



Davidson, C.H . , 

Lawson, W 

Davidson, A. F . . 
Henshaw, F. C . . 
Wanklyn, F. L... 
Maguire, J. A . . . 
Champion, C. P. . 
Adams, A. W . . . 
Kingsmill, N . . . . 
Moody, E.W.B. 
Chipman, H. L . . 

Schultze, E 

iDwyer, C 

Thomson, P. W. 
Rouleau, E. H . . . 

Curren, A. E 

I Joseph, J 

Mathys, F. B.... 

Bate, H. A 

Donner, E. 



Quebec, Que .... 
St. John, N.B . . 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Victoria, B.C. . . 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Gaspe, Que 

Halifax, N.S.... 



Designation. 



Consul 

Consular Agent . 

Vice-Con.sul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul . . . . 
Consul General . 
Vice-Consul . . . . 
Consul 



Vice-Consul 

Honorary Consul 

ti Consul General. 

II Consular Agent. 

II Vice-Consul . . . . 
Consul 



When 
Appointed 



Vice-Consul 



Consul General. 



De Vos, E. Rob i Acting Consul General 

Joseph, A. C 'Consul 

De Bury, Count R. . | i- 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 



Montreal, Que. 



Ottawa, Ont . . . 
Paspebiac, Que 
Quebec, Que. . . 
St. John, N.B . 



Sydney, N.S. 
Toronto, Ont 



Brantford, Ont 

Montreal, Que 

Quebec, Que 

Vancouver, B.C 

Montreal, Que ... 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que 

Ottawa, Ont 

Quebec, Que . . 

St. John, N.B 

Victoria, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man 

Berlin, Ont 

Ottawa, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

ChaTlottetown,P.E.I 
Chatham, N.B 



Commercial Agent 

II 
Vice-Consul 



Commercial Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Commercial Agent. 



Whitehead, J. W. 

iSmith, T. R 

Dubuc, A. J. H ... 

LeGros, P. E 

Creighton, J. W. . . 

Bentley, W. D 

jLeprohon, C. de B.. 
iLeprohon, J. L , . . 
Stewart, McLeod . . 
Bouillon, E. A. A . 

Levasseur, N Vice-Consul 

Jarvis, C. E. L n 

Jarvis, M. M Commercial Agent, 

Kimber, F. C Vice-Consul ... 

Rae, G. M Commercial Agent 

Musson, Geo ; Vice-Consul 

Waterous, C. A ! m 

Day, Geo jConsul 

Frechette, O.... ...I .. 

Morris, M. P j Consul General. . . 

Lemjeux, R iConsul 

Mathers, H. I. . ..I i. 

Woltf, H. H I. 

Meyer, C. C | Vice-Consul 

Wurtele, E. F i 

De Bury, L. Visart.. m 

Ward, W. A j ., 

Schmidt, A 

Minchin, D.J. . . . 
Valverde, Miguel . . . 

MacQuillan, J 

Macdonald, A. A. . . 
Snowball, Hon. J. B. 



Consul General 



Consular Agent . 



1888 
1889 
1898 
1887 
1888 
1883 
1892 
1894 
1887 
1899 
1896 
1899 
1882 
1899 
1889 
1889 
1889 
1892 
1889 
1899 
1901 
1886 
1899 
1897 
1892 
1901 
1900 
1899 
1882 
1899 
1900 
1882 
1899 
1894 
1896 
1901 
1884 
1900 
1889 
1886 
1897 
1885 
1897 
1892 
1895 
189a 
1893 
1899 
1900 
1896 
1890 
1898 
1900 
1898 
1901 
1877 



FOREIGN COUNTRIES REPRESENTED IN CANADA 47 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

Alphabetical List of Foreign Couatries represented by Consuls, Vice-Consu 
Consular Agents and Commercial Agents, &c. — Continued. 



Country. 


Place. 


Name. 


Designation. 


When 
Appointed 


France— (7on« 


Dawson City, Y.T.. 

Escoumains, Que 

Gaspe, Que 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que 

Sydney, N.S 

St. John, N.B ... 

Toronto, Ont 

Three Rivers, Que. . . 
Vancouver, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man 

Chatham, N.B 

Dawson, Y.T 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que 

Pictou, N.S 

Pugwash, N.S 

Sydney, N.S 

St. John, N.B,. . 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Victoria, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man 

Montreal, Que .... 

Quebec, Que 

Toronto, Ont 

Winnipeg, Man ... . 

Halifax, N.S 

Chatham, N.B 

Gaspe Basin, Que. . . 
Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que 

Quebec, Que 

St. John, N.B 

Toronto, < nt 

Vancouver, B.C 

Montreal, Que 

Vancouver, B.C 

Toronto, Ont. 



Montreal, Que 

Quebec, Que 

Toronto, Ont 

\fontreal One 


Auzias-Turenne, R. . 

Topping, J 

Carter, A. T 

Franklin, G. E 

Kleczkowski, A 

Duchastel de Mont- 
rouge 

Mosely, F 


Consular Agent 

II 

II 

Consul General . 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

II 


1898 
1891 
1891 
1881 
1894 

1900 
1892 




De Bury, Count R . . 

Bolte, A 

Balcer, Geo 

St. Laurent, Baron 

H.de 

Gautier. F 


1901 
1892 




II ... 

Consul 


1878 

1899 
1899 


Germany 


Morrison, A 

Wenskv, W 

Grant, M. C 

Bopp, Franz 

Dwyer, C 

Wilson, A 

Dobson, G. H 

Thomson, R 

Nordheimer, S' 

Wulfsohm, J 

Lovveuberg, C 

Hespeler, W 

Brickman, H 

Sexton, J. P 

Brophy, H 

Levasseur, N 

Morang, G. N .... 

Bell, C. N 

Carney M 


1872 






1900 
1899 
1898 
1891 






1874 




Consul 


1880 
1878 






1889 
1895 
1891 




Acting Consul 


1882 
1896 


Greece . 


Consul General , . . . 

Consul . 


1899 


Guatemala 


1899 
1897 






1897 


Haiti 


II 

Consular Agent 


1897 
1880 


Italy 


Watt.G 

LeBoutillier, 0. S... 
Fisher Cavalier, G.G 

Hanright, F. G 

Mazza, Count F . . . 

Auger, Jacques 

Thomas, 0. J 

Smith, Dr. Harley. . 

Ferrera, A. A 

Nosse, Tatszgoro 

Shimidzu, S 

Oronhyatekha, Dr. . . 

Nichoils, F 

Ansell, D. A 

Turner, R 

Mitchell, W. A 

Coutlee, J. L 

Wickewire, Dr, W. . 
Boissevain, C. D. W. 

Heward, S. B 

Nordheimer, A . ... 

Johnson, G. G 

Ohlen, E 


1886 




1894 




Consul 

Vice-Consul 


1891 
1891 




Consul General 


1901 


Japan 


Acting Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consul General. . . 


1894 
1886 
1901 
1901 
1901 


Liberia 


Consul ... 

Consul General 


1898 
1901 


Mexico . ... 

Monaco, Principality 
of 


Vice-Consul 

Consul General 

Vice-Con.«<ul 

1 

Consul 


1887 
1888 
1900 
1901 

1898 


Netherlands 


Halifax, N.S..!!!!!.' 


1886 




Montreal, Que 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B. C 

Montreal, Que 

Vancouver, B. C 

Montreal, Que 

Vancouver, B. C . . . 
Annapolis andDigby, 

Bridge water, N.S. . . 
Chicoutimi, Que 


Consul General 

Vice-Consul 


1895 
1879 


Nicaragua, Repub. of 


Consul 

Consular Agent 


1889 
1896 
1899 




Leet, L. T 


1899 




Morris, M. P 

Ohlen, E 


1899 


Peru 




1900 




Leet, L. T 

Alexander, R. H 

Whitman, T. S.. . . . . 

Davidson, Francis.. 
Sturton, 4l . 


Consular Agent 

Consul . ... 


1900 
1895 


Portugal 








1889 






1881 
1893 









48 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECBETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDOUARD VII, .A. 1902 

Alphabetical List of Foreign Countries, represented by Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Con- 
sular Agents, Commercial Agents, -(fee. — Continued. 



Country. 


Place. 


Name. 


Designation. 


When 
Appointed 


Portugal 


Gaspe Basin, Que . . . 
Halifax, N.S. . .. 

Montreal, Que 

Paspebiac, Que . . . . 
Quebec Qne 


Carpenter, C.B.K... 

Oxley, F. H 

Routh, F. A 

Le Quesne. J. C 

Carbray, Felix . ... 

HiUier, E 

Allison, F. F.. 


Vice Consul 

Consul 


1895 
1898 






1875 




Vice Consul ... 

Consxal . . 


1898 
1875 




St. Etienne 

St John 


Vice Consul 

Consul 

Vice Consul 

Consul .... 


1893 

1878 




Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que 

Chatham, N. B 

Charlottetown, P. E. I 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que 

Pictou, N.S 


Mathers, H. I 

Struve, N. de 

Fraser, G. B 

Aitken, W. H 

Jones, W. G 

Brodett, M.J. Quin- 

tana y 

Martinez, J. A 

Primrose, H 

Frechette, 

Jack, D. R 

Purves, J. D. A 

Thompson, J. E 

Read, J 


1899 




1900 


Spain 




1880 


Vice Consul 


1892 
1894 




Consul General 


1901 




Vice Consul 

Consular Agent 

Vice Consul 


1901 
1869 




Quel>ec, Que 

St John N B 


1898 
1892 


Sweden and Norway 


Sydney, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 

Baie Verte, N.B.... 

Bathurst, N.B^ 

Bridgewater, N.S. . . 
Buctouche, N.B. ... 
Calgary, N.W.T.... 
Campbellton, N. B . . 

Caraquet, N.B. 

Chatham, N.B 

Chicoutimi, Que .... 

Dalhousie, N.B 

Dawson, Y.T 

Escoumains, Que. . . . 

Halifax, N.S 

Little Glace Bay, NS 

Matane, Que 

Minnedosa, Man. . . . 

Montreal, Que 

Northport, N.S 

Nya Stockholm, Assa 
Ottawa, Ont ........ 

Parrsboro, N.S 

Pictou N S. 


1899 
1900 
1897 


Gilbert, G 




1897 




Wad^, F. B 


1882 




Ross, J. C 

Nolan, J. A 

Mott, W. A 

Rive, P 


H ::::.::: ::.::.: 


1878 
1901 

1888 
1884 




Hutchison, E 

Sturton, A 

Haddow, Geo 

Patullo, T. D 

Topi»ing, J 

Mathers, H. I 

Rigby, E. D 

Fraser, A . . 


1889 

1865 

1900 

1886 

1895 

1886 . 

1874 




Mever, R. H 

Gylling, G. E 

Ferguson, D. P 

Hofstrand, CO.. . 
MacCuaig, R. C. W. 
Nordby, N.C.N... . 

Davies, J. R 

Black, H. C 

Wurtele, E. F 

Rpitr Rfiv R O 


1896 
1897 
1886 
189a 
1882 
1886 
1884 




Pugwash, N. S 

Quebec, Que 

Rat Portage, Ont.. 


1892 

1899 
1901 




Richibucto, Que Hutchinson, R 





1860 
1884 




Sheet Harbour, N.S. 

Sherbrooke, Que 

Ship Harbour, N.S. . 
Sydney, N.S 


MacMillan, F 

Maclean, D . . . 





1882 
1885 




Gillis, J. A 


190O 




Bnrrhe]]. J. E 


1881 




Ste. Anne, Que Lamontague, T. J. . . 

St. John, N.B .. Thomson. J. H 




1875 
1885 




St. Margaret's Bay, 

N.S 

St. Thomas de Mont- 

magny. Que 

Three Rivers, Que.. 
Toronto Ont.. 


Corbett, Fred 

Owen, P. G 

Balcer, G 




1901 

1898 
1875 




■Hprt.yl-ieror A. Ti 




1895 




Vancouver, B.C Whitehead. J. W. . . 




1901 




Victoria, B.C 


Smith, R. T 

Machire, J. C 

(xreen, J . A. 




1900 




Winnipeg, Man 

Yarmouth, N.S 


Vice Consul 


1901 
1891 




Law. B. B 


Consul 

Vice Consul 


1895 


Switzerland 


Rev D. L 


1891 






1892 


United States 


Alberton, P.E.I 


Glidden, A 


Consular Agent 


1891 



FOREIGN COUNTRIES REPRESENTED IN CANADA 49 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

Alphabetical List of Foreign Couatries, represented by Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Con- 
sular Agents, Commercial Agents, &c. — Continued. 



Country. 



United States— (7on, 



Place. 



Name. 



Designation. 



Amherstburg, Ont. 



Annapolis, N.S. . 

Arichat, N.S 

Arnprior, Ont . . . 
Arthabaska, Que . 
Barrie, Ont. . .. . . 

Barrington, N.S. 
Bathurst, N.B . . , 
Belleville, Ont . 



Brantford, Ont. . . . 
Bridgewater, N.S. 
Brockville, Ont — 



Campobello Is,, N.B. 
Campbellton, N. B. . . 

Cape Canso, N.S . . . 
Charlotteto\vn,P.E.I 

'Chatham, Ont. . . 



iChaudiere June, Que 

IChemainus, B.C 

Cheverie, N.S 

Clarenceville, Que. . . 

Clinton, Ont 

Coaticook, Que 



29—4 



Colling wood, Ont. 



Cookshire, Que. 
Cornwall, Ont. 



Coteau, Que 

Courtwright, Ont... 
Cumberland, B.C., 
Dawson, Y.T.. . . 



Deloraine, Man . 

Deseronto, Ont 

Digby, N.S 

Edmunston, N.B. . . 
Emerson, Man ... . 

Fernie, B.C 

Fort Erie, Ont . . . 



Fort William, Ont. 

Fredericton, N.B 

Gait, Ont. 

Gaspe Basin, Que . . , 
II . . , 

Georgetown, P.E.I. 
Goderich, Ont . 



Grand Manan, N.B. 

Grenville, Que 

Gretna, Man 

Guelph, Ont 



Halifax, N.S 

Hamilton, Ont 

II . . . - 

Hemmingford, Que. 



Martin, C. W. 
Heough, F. A. 
Owen, J. M. . . 

Binet, S 

Burwash, A . . 
Poitras, Arthur 
Creswicke, E. H 
Robertson, T. W 
MuUins, B. C. 
Hendrick, M. J 
Ponton, W. N, 
Hardy, A. C... 
Owen, W. H... 
Merriman, C. W 
Wood, W. W . 
Alexander, J. I 
Benedict, J. S 

Murray, C 

Hart, A. W. . , 
Vail, D. J.... 
Crockett, J. T, 
Montieth, C. E 
Gordon, Wni. . 
Rosse, J. M. 
Gibson, J. S. . 
Burgess, J. G. 
Taylor, E.C.. 
Pattison, A. O 
Dale, G. N.. . . 
Williams, F.. 
McDonell, C. 
Small, Wm. . . 
Given, W.F.. 
Flack, D. A 
Hamilton, J. E, 
Stapleton, T.. 
Baby, F. W.. 
Clinton, G. W 
McCook, J. C. 
Roller, H. T.. 
Arnold, F. W. 
Herron, A. M 
Millener, C. A 
Stewart, W. B 
Guy, J. A... 
Mc Arthur, D. 
Pollock, J. R. 

Bedell, O 

Bedell, J. v.. 
Jarvis, C. W . . 
I Sharkey, J. T. 
Ryerson, Jas. . 
Dickson, A. F 

Carter, J 

McDonald, A. 
Shirley, J. H.. 
Campbell, Win 
Eraser, W. A. 
Pridham, A. . . 
Winkler, E... 
Daly, C. N.... 
Oxnard, G. A. 
Foster, J. G . . 

HUl, Geo 

Shepard, J. M 
Butler, R.. . 
Wark, W. W . 



jConsul 

I Vice and Deputy Consul. 
Consular Agent 



Consul 

Vice- Consul 

Consular Agent . 



Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Commercial Agent 

Vice-Commercial Agent. 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul. 

Consul 

Vice-Consul. 

Commercial Agent 

Consular Agent 



Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Vice and Deputy Com. Agent 

Commercial Agent 

Consular Agent 



Consul 

Vice-Consul . . . . 
Deputy Consul. . 
Consular Agent . 



Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul. 
Consular Agent 



Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Commercial agent 

Vice-Consular Agent. 
Consular Agent 



Consul 

Vice and Deputy C jnsul 

Consul General 

Vice and Dep. Consul General 

Consul . 

Vice and Deputy Consul 

Consular Agent. . 



When 
Appointed 



1897 
1897 
1872 
1899 
1901 
1887 
1895 
1892 
1893 
1893 
1885 
1899 
1872 
1898 
1893 
1887 
1897 
1897 
1885 
1897 
1890 
1897 
1896 
1898 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1890 
1901 
1901 
1899 
1899 
1898 
1901 
1901 
1896 
1882 
1899 
1898 
1900 
1901 
1890 
1890 
1873 
1896 
1889 
1901 
1897 
1900 
3895 
1894 
1899 
1887 
1890 
1883 
1902 
1883 
1890 
1879 
1893 
1893 
1883 
1897 
1892 
1897 
1898 
1885 



50 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

Alphabetical List of Foreign Countries represented by Consuls, Vice-Consuls, 
Consular Agents, Commercial Agents, &c. — Continued. 



Country. 



United States — Con. 




Hereford, Que 

Huntingdon, Que... 

Kingsport, N.S 

Kingston, Ont 



Lethbridge, N.W.T 

Lindsay, Ont 

Lineboro', Que. . . . 

Liverpool, N.S !Mack, J. M 

Lockeport, N.S Churchill, E. 



Xicholls, J. R . . . 

Dineen, J 

Bigelow, E 

Twitchell, M. H. 

Folger, M. H 

Downer, F. W. . . 
Knowlson, J. M. 
Beebe, H. S 



London, Ont. 



Louisbourg, '^N.S. 
Lunenburg, N.S. 
Megantic, Que. 
Midland, Ont. . . . 
Moncton, N.B. . . 



Montreal, Que, 



JMulgrave, N.S 

Nanaimo, B,C 

Napanee Ont 

Nelbon, B.C 

Newcastle, N.B 

Niagara Falls, Ont . . 



North Bay, Ont 

NorthPortal, N.W.T 
Orillia, Ont 



Oshawa, Ont . 
Ottawa, Ont. 



Culver, H. S.... 

Reid, R 

LeVatte, H. C. ^ 

Owen, D. M 

Albro, H. W. .. 
White, R. F.... 
Buetelspacher, C 
Steeves, C. A . . . 
Bettinger, J. R.. 
Gorman, P . . . . 

Bain, A 

Schetky, G. S. . 
Templeton, Wm 

Brown, E. C 

Call, R. R 

Brush. H. W • I Consul 



Designation. 



Consular Agent. 



Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul . 
Consular Agent 



Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul. 
Consular Agent 



When 
Appointed 



Consul 

Vice and Deputy Com. Agent 

Consul General . , 

Vice and Deputy Consul Gen 
Consular Agent , 



Colcock, N. B. .. 
McKeown, D. J. 
Dorsey, W. H. . 
Wakefield, E. A . 

Jupp, R. H 

Stericker, W. P. . 

Turner, C. E 

Sanford, H. M... 
Robertson, W. T. 

Shea, R. A . 

Hume, W. W. .. 

Foot, W. R 

Hoke, L. H 

Fisson, D 

Bell, F. J 

Bt 'ringer, J. "E^ . . 
Da vies, J. R 



Owen Sound, Ont. . . 
Palmerston, Ont. . . . 

Palis, Ont . . . 

Pan-y Sound, Ont. . . 

Parrsboro', N.S 

Paspebiac, Que 

Peterborough, Ont. . 

Picton, Ont 

Pictou, N.S 

Port Hawkesbury 
and Mu]grave,N.S. Bain, A 

Port Hope, Ont Dill, H. P jConsul 

n Harcourt, John. . . . Vice and Deputy Consul. . . 

Port Rowan, Ont. . . . Killmaster, G. B. . . . Consular Agent 

jMeek, W. A | Vice -Commercial Agent. . . 

I -, Consul 



Vice and Deputy Consul. 
Conpular Agent 



Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul General 

Vice and Deputy Consul Gen. 
Consular Agent 



Port Sarnia, Ont 



McMillan, N 
Chester, A... . 



Port Sarnia and St.' 

Thomas, Ont jBurke, M. J. . 

.... IKing, W. H . 

Potton, Que JDorman, J. S. 

Prescott, Ont Anderson, G. 

I. Buckly, Jas. . . 

Pugwash and Wallace 



N.S. 
Quebec, Que. 



Rat Portage 

Richibucto, N.B. 
Rimouski, Que. . . 



River Hebert, N.S. 



Morris, C. W... 
Henry, W. W... 

Stocking, F. S . . . 

Frisbie, G. C 

Murray, T. O..., 
Boardman, C. A. 

St Pierre, A 

Moffatt, Wm.... 



Vice and Deputy Consul. 



Consul . 

Vice and Deputy Consul. 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul . 



Consular Agent. 

Consul 

Vice-Consul .... 
Consular Agent . 



Commercial Agent 

Vice and Deputy Com. Agent 
Consular Agent 



1870 
1895 
1901 
1878 
1874 
1899 
1894 
1893 
1896 
1901 
1897 
1899 
1898 
1883 
1899 
1900 
1898 
1901 
1897 
1886 
1886 
1898 
1888 
1901 
1866 
1899 
1900 
1894 
1895 
1900 
1900 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1894 
1899 
1892 
1892 
1899 
1889 
1887 
1888 
1897 

1886 
1900 
1900 
1894 
1894 
1898 
1900 

1897 
1887 
1901 
1900 
1876 

1888 
1897 
1898 
1898 
1901 
1897 
1901 
1899 



FOREIGN COUNTRIES REPRESENTED IN CANADA 51 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

Alphabetical List of Foreign Countries represented by Consuls, Vice-Consuls, 
Consular Agents, Commercial Agents, &c. — Concluded. 



Country. 



United States— Con. 



Uruguay 



Venezuela 



Place. 



Rossland, B.C 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 



Shelburne, N.S.. 
Sherbrooke, Que 



Sorel, Que 

Souris, P.E.I 

Stanbridge, Que . . 



Stanstead, Que. 
Stratford, Ont. 



Sudbury, Ont 

SuDimerside, P.E.I. 

Sutton, Que 

Sydney, N.S 



St. Andrews, N.B. .. 
St. Catharines, Ont.. 
St. George, N.B.... 
St. Hyacinthe, Que.. 



St. John, N.B.... 

II .... 

St. Johns, Que .... 

St. Stephen, N.B . 

II 
St. Thomas, Ont . . 

II . . 

Three Rivers, Que 

Toronto, Ont 



Name. 



Designation. 



Consular Agent 

Commercial Agent. ... 
Vice-Commercial Agent.. 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul . 
Consular Agent 



Commercial Agent 

Vice and Deputy Com, Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Vice and Deputy Com. Agent 
Consular Agent 



Consul 



Trenton, Ont. . . 
Vancouver, B.C 

Victoria" B.C. 



Wallace, N.S 

Wallaceburg, Ont. . 



Waterloo, Que. 
Wiarton, Ont . 
Wmdsor,N.S. 



Ont.... 

Winnipeg, Man. . 

II . . 

Woodstock, N.B. 

II 
Yarmouth, N.S. . 



Jackson. John . . . 
Shotts, G. W..., 
Flockhart, A. R , 

Bill, E. M 

Lang, P 

Borlase, G. E.... 

Sylvestre, I 

Carlton, C. C... 
Johnson, F. S. S 
Hastings, G. M . , 
Buttertield, B. F 
Seyfert, A. G. . . , 
Dingman, W. S. 
Hillary, N. ¥. M 

Hunt, R 

Olmstead, F. A. , 

West, G. .N 

Burchell, J. E j Vice-Consul 

Stickney, G. H 'Consular Agent 

Collard, L. H 

Milliken, E 

Authier, J. M | Commercial Agent 

Bartels, F^ jVice and Deputy Com. Agent 

Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul. ... 

Consul . . 

Vice and Deputy Consul 

Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul 

Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul ... 

Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul 

Consul . . 

Vice and Deputy Consul 

Consular Agent 

Vice and Deuuty Com. Agent. 

Consular Agent. . . . .- 



Bridgewater, N.S. 
Chicoutimi, Que . . 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que . . . 
St. John, N.B.... 
Montreal, Que . . . . 
Toronto, Ont . . . 



Myers, I. B. 

Jewett, L. M 

iDeal, C 

'Donaghy, J 

McCullough, C. A 

;Vroom, C. N 

iBurke, M. J 

iKing, W. H 

Ledoux, U. J. ... 
Bra man, W. W... 
{Gunsaulus, E. N. . 

iSewell, R. L 

jYoving, S. J 

! Dudley, L. E. . 

Schofield, F 

Smith, A. E 

Hunter, B. A 

Morris, C. W 

Jackson, C. B 

Worden, I. G 

Eastman, CM 

Tibeaudo, J. H . . . 

Hoke, J. T 

Nalder, J , 

Morris, H. C 

Little, J. M 

Graham, W. H. H 

Hall, Wni. , 

Denison, F. C , . . . , 

Graham, John 

Carter, M. J 

Armstrong, E. H.. , 
Davison, E. D . . . . 

Scott, J. G 

jBoach, Senor 

jMaguire, J. A. . . . , 
Goodwin, A. D.. . . 

Laurence, E 

Laurence, B 



Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul . 

Consul . 

Vice and Deputy Consul , 

Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul , 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice and Deputy Consul . 
Vice Consul 



Consul 



Vice Consul 
Consul 



When 
Appointed 



1899 
1898 
1895 
1901 
1897 
1899 
1893 
1880 
1900 
1884 
1897 
1897 
1899 
1901 
1899 
1900 
1897 
1897 
1892 
1875 
1898 
1898 
1882 
1897 
1901 
1897 
1890 
1897 
1895 
1897 
1887 
1897 
1891 
1901 
1898 
1891 
1897 
1899 
1897 
1900 
1888 
1888 
1886 
1901 
1899 
1897 
1897 
1899 
1898 
1898 
1899 
1897 
1893 
1901 
1894 
1901 
1885 
1879 
1883 
1876 
1886 
1886 



29-4J 



DEPARTMENT OF THE SEORETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 






Ph 
Ph 



d 
.2 

to 

^'^ 
(D 



^ 



a 

112 



^^1 



I— I C^ 1— ( 






^ 






>5C 



O ® 



c5 c 
TJ be 






i 
|i 

^ • 
-« : 

r! . 
o . 



CO ^03 



"S 



O cS 



bp g 



dp 

a; 

03 ^ 



s 2 

I- 

o a; 03 

if c^ 



be ai 
•13 fi 



I^ 03 



03 


<4-l 


03 ■ • 


.J= 




J= • 




bt) 




• »- 


S 












T3 




:'i 


tf 


^ • 


c8 

: % 


O 


■'5 : 


: ^ 


03 




' f^ 




w . 


• s 


;3 


03 ■ 


:^ 


f 


-G . 


.'^ 


S 


fl 




§ 


>! • 


■ 03 


; — ; 


<13 , 










ffl 


a • 


• ir 


03 


<5 • 








• s 


O 


3 • 


ill 





, 03 
03 S ^ 



5 »" 






J-, 03 '-' 
03 -C u 

03 C -ts 

^ 03 ce 

o c >>-5: 

-^'^-^ ^ 

02 2 =« S 



03 C 



IS 
^§ 

JO 

03 !?; 
T3 



3 03 



abc^ 



CC^ bD 

4^ P V gj rt 

CM O-^^ S 

. g .. -^ fc. O 



T3 









^•1 sw-e^=« 



S S x-n^ c > Si 
.t2 +j 03 -^.S o eS 



_ 03 



£ -- 



-^ c 0^ .1 



0'^<4-( 



ill 






£ S'-ST-O 



^30 

a 



08 



e: fl ; 
fl G S 2 0-2 I §1 

H C c3 -in T-^ ?-t C '^ ^ 
c« t^ O -^^U o o.i<! fl 



-< ^ 



a' 



fl ^M.2-*^ fe 03 J 
O <» b S^ ® flTD_r< 

ci"-5 ^ c 02 a-^ S 

.2o3p.2.^g03i3 

S S O 



§ IS 



03 r^ 
Ph O 

c o 



SYNOPSIS OF RETURNS 



53 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 













ts 






(?Q 




00 










^ 


1—1 






—J 




Oi 




tMO 


^ 


CO 












(M 






(M 




(N 








M 


(M 








(M 


i-< 












■^ 




























, 1 








,_i 










1 


OS 






pi 




, 








= 


= 






< 


■ ^ 


= = 




<5 








o 






1—1 




^ 








g 


O 






ci 


CO 


"*'■* 


coc^ 


(m' 




Ph 






> 


(M 






(N 










CO 








(M 


iH 


1-1 IN 








































F— 1 


















3i 












= 








= 


= 






a 

< 


J 

S 






< 










■* 






"<* 




Tt^' 




rt^' 


•^ 


"* 


Tt 






rti 


■*' 


• • 








Tf SOi£ 


■* Tt 


^ 






i 










T-^ 




T-* 




1-1 


r-l 










rH 




iH 1— 1 1— 


1—1 1— 


r-\ 






B, 




j5 












































E^ 






' 






























i-H 








. 


















"~^ 
























O 




-^ 






















.>> 


















•^ 






OS 

1— 1 




i 






















1 






















' 


d 




-E 






















02 


















:0 

11 


03 E 




,o 




ll 




















•'s 


"3 


















ld 


• 


S 
























i 


^ 




1 
















■ 


w. 












§ 










g 


;- 


c 














:?.&«" 


, 1 


m 




S ^ 




Ch 






^ 




' ^ 




O 


L^ 


^ 


^ 






;4 


(^ 


■E = 2 

h- 1 "^"^ 


'^> 


i 








.2 

1— 1 






2 




1 






C. 








.2 


1 


II 


o 

1 


a 












^ 




hH 






—• 


^ 


1 






{^ 


^a 


p. 


3 




s ^ 




CO 






M 




CO 




crj 


W 


« 






cc 


CO 


CO CO 


CO 


CO 


««-) 


"o 


w ^'^ 


"S* 


'V 




















T— 






1—1 




1—1 T— 


1- 




o 


a) 


il" 




c!i 






(M 




c^ 




(r<i 


5 


(M 






cij 


^ 


(M CO 


CO 


CO 






r-l 






T-H 




















r-i 




1—1 1— 




tH 


1 


^^-^ 


s 


4 






. 




_ 








. 


_ 






_ 


_ 


_ 




= 


o 
K 

o 

09 

-^ 

O 

1 

u 

3 

S 

&^ 




^ =3 




^ 






































1 




•2 --sis 
i . " a 5 

Pill 

O (^ 35 O S 


1 

|! 

|£ 

2 > 

bC'*: 

'c ^ 
■-3 c 

P 


11 

vS'p:; 

11 

^ 5 

-11. 
1 II 
HI 
III 


0) 

i 

13 
O 
X 

W 
.2 
W 

-S 

eS 

IB 

c 

N 

'8 

a;- 

i 


-1 

II 
> fl 

00 § 

M 

= 1 

ii 

i| 

■^"^ 

Ct3 

c a 

1g 

^ s 


1 

^ > 

■11 

• > 2 

. fl 9: 

. v *■ 
■ 1> 5 


s8 

W 

ll 
go; 

11 

"J 

3 aT £ 
3 i 


Is 

I! 

* u 

00 ei 

IJ 

n 

la 

c'o 
o ^ 




a 

^% 

M 

is 

ii 
c| 
II 

IB 

111 


.2 
1 

5 
1 

03 



■g 

c 
o 

■P 

.0 

'J 
J 


~ :p3 

: c 

• o 

■^ 

• > 

• i 

• bo 

•1 

j1 

11 
it 


2 :li ; 
^ ■ 1^- ■■ 

sS-s^l 
















3 


III 




O 5 


U 




S 

03 


: o3 

iH**- 


SS8 


1— 1 


I-H 


ill 

l6.s 










5 < 








1— 1 


< 






_^ 




Pi 






<1 


P^ 










Ik 






tE 




ffi : 
















W ': 


M 


i 


• 












• i-i 






a 


■ 








^ 




• 


r4 




02 


35 


rj 


fj 


^ 










M 






c 


• 


o : 






J 




g 


J 




0) ; 


03 


J 


J 


8 
















(T 

c 


) : 


CO • 






■| 




M 


i 




1 : 
o : 


c3 

x: 
O 


^ 


i 


H 






O 




^ ^ 






^ 










^i^ 




U 


C^ 




h 


^ 


»^ 


U 


»^ 






g 




^'^ ^ 


J 




S 


'i 








§ 




g 


S 




?i 


^J 


^ 


§ 


§ 










1^ ^ c 






i. 


, a 


a> ^ 






»i 




^ 


t^ 




%. a 


;- C 


' tl 


(^ 


&? 










S S :: 






a 




r^ 3 






a; 




<S 


a; 




« :3 


03 5 


03 


03 


03 










-HJ^ 






1 


H 


:§H 










'H 


'H 




-SH 


^^ 


"H 


'H 


'B 




















<5 






o 




o 


JD 




O 


o 


o 


o 


o 




uaqrani^ 




iH (M 






a 


3 


•* 






lO 




o 


t- 




CO 


Oi 


o 


i-( 


(N 






aouajapy; 






































T-i 


'"' 


1-H 



54 



DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 



.• ! 



« 



p^ 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



-^ 



w 



e 
o 

OS 



I 



QQ 

o 

QQ 



§ 



<M <M 



?q (M 5^ (M (M*^ 



= 


= 


= 


= 


=1 


• m 












-S 
C 


8 

£3 








03 


,<§ 












Q 










s 


13 

c5 


t3 
c3 




y 

^ 

h 




1 




aj 


^ 


S-T? 


c8 


•1 


"S 


2 


2 


1 



■i 



^ 2 



(S g 



O » fc! 

„ 02 (D 



pa 



05 OS 
i-H iH 

00 00 



g^ ^ 



Is 
fco" 



'S iJ 



§1 



§'^ J 

Ago 

® >. 

? £ o 

I/O 

S^ »- ® 
^ »^ 

in 






^^ 



rS fl 






e8 .T3 



=6 fl 



p5 J 



t C3 03 

» w 03 
^ C3 03 



'^^ q 03^ 

all g^ 

05 O 



-in 
-I -^ 

O Q fl 



igS 
■3 -Si 



a-qs 



-I 

03 

a§ 



^ -5 

.S 03 



03 <r> ' 






— 03 
03 1^ 



"I 



•^-^ 

tS 03 

•2 03^2 

®'^ s 

" 5:! ® 



m ^ 



-0 03 -ss^ 
^S :o:g| 

^ ^ : bo 2 03 

C -5 • -^ ^ -►^ 

- 03-g g^-^ O 
Jl, " O '^ OD -k^ 

^ i^ fee « 



6tt 
111 

Soo S, 









'C5 c3^ «8 03 
itfi'tS := fl C 



5 



5"o &.i: ^^ 

C ec S 03 03^^ 

boC §^ be 03 

^03 g,c S3 

ti DO 13 n 'wT^ 

C3 03 ^< 03 £V OJ 



.P^. 



^";5 



M 

CO 

03 

Q 
(^ 

03 3 

o 



w 

03 
03 

o 

?a 

o 



1^ f- 



" 

u c3 

03 ^r 

73 P- 



O 






N M ?5 



SYXOPSIS OF RETURNS 



5S 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 



< ^ 



< ^ 



§^ ^ 









P^ H H 



^ ?^ §5 

i I I 

Jq 5^ <M 









II 






5§ 

©"do 

^2 So 
o 



§:= 



^ a 



o S 



C o 
5 be 

1-5 



■S ©'a - "=* 



0-3 
U 

<S) c 

^^ 

II 



I 

e 2 - 

© 3j t- 






■c_ rH 5 a ^ 



a> 






- O = 









•-^ /* ""^ T3 tL a <!' 



o c 



--^ y ^ ., g g 

©•3 - S ? g c-3 ?^^ > 



^l-s 



(D. 



fc-'C'*^ fi4 



br^.^ 



o fl be 



II 

'O o 

il 

be® 



"S.S 



® > 

go 



^1 



t3 ^ O 
OJr-l y 



• 2 1^ 
o 



C c8 © C"" 



e3 ^ ^J3 0) 

-C .-s .5 -^ -C 

33 f*-.-""^ 



5 ® 

11 

53 hr 



> S 

o <s 



® C M ^ 

fl 2 3 01 
^-^§ 



* S i 






O X {j 

® * 2 S" 






-2 5 o o o 

'© S-pi ® c8 

« ? fc: 2 

>^ ^ ® g=! 












§ I! |llli.|liil^:r U I Ills ill 

S S. 5 O, 33 © « 0_^ ^. >,*^'0 H ^ C f^.® §. (D CD S, 2 -ki O S O 4J 



5 5^ S.>^"i|'0 
a © © ^ a 



<1 <J 



g © >,.S £ « I s c 



a rt 
a 






© o c &r2 



si 



6 

© a 
O 



w 






4^ s^ 

1^ X X 



s g 



a © 

o 



f- • — ' 

o 



T3td 



^ S 






bo 


a ■ 
-a • 


w 


: 


^ 


.s t: 


s 


^ K 




• • Pi 


00 


OC^^ 


© 


gH 








:Sa 


< 


-tj 



^ s^ 



g5 g 



56 



DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



S 



%< 



^ 


<MCO 


t» 


= 


Nil. 

M'rch 

April 




^ 


ssg 


d 


= 


S =1 


>, 






CO ec»o t>. cc 

jH t-ItH C<1 .H 



CI 

J . 



O c3 



H :g 





cc 










X 


i3 










cS 


S 




N 


o 




o 











^ 3 C3 






I 






^ o 









— (J) CO 



: o X 



s- C 



i=i 5 _ 



•Sffi 






*^*^ o 

«4-< ^ -kJ 

^ S Q) 

PI. 

U 03-3 5 

., ;> f-( s 
T, ^^ -^ 

i^il 

X *J T-l ^ 

'^ a '-f^ 9-. 
<^ O cs S 

^ jii ^ « 
^ 2 /^ 

iK 5 5 " 

o 



§1 

c (c 






2a 



§o8 :p 

S .^'-li JS*^ S^*^ 
be Pi IS*,;;. 5 ^O 






C3 ^ 

bos 

C Q 



+3 >^ 

CM 












— © 

< 



III ml 

C^ © 

w Q O 



'^ C ;- S r-1 ^ 

jT 2 !^ 5 © S 



^1 © 



ig 
© 

4) I— I © 



=3 ^ 

^ © 
© u 



95 O 

I- 
^- 

bcP 



.2§ 

g© 

c C 



Q 



bc| 
■-Si? 






-u S3 



a^ 

O 



t: bo 
? © 



73 S 

wrt 
^1 



> o 

S3 






fl S cs 



"I 



P5- 



O 



f§ 



SM 



O 

"I ..a 

t-.2 t- a 

©s> ® s 

o o 






^ 



SFNOPSIS OF RETURNS 



hi 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 



>. 


^ 


rt 


«S 


§ 


S 


t^ 


tN 




C^ 


>. 




<A 


CJ 


S 


§ 



^ r? 



<! <1 S 



•a 



% < ^ 



T-IIM (?5 



a, = = 



o »o m 



A = = 



-5 -^ 
Q O 

P5 fd 






3 c 



W CD X O) CO w 

s c2 ^ § 



-I 



© IS 

0.5 






>- P5 



S g 



cc 52 1^ 



ci 



3M' 



11 






ill 



'2 « 



'W 



-, S 






.1^ 



bets 

9 y^ 






ai 



,-« 02 2S -n i 

^3 02 a; S S 



§1 

61 



aO 






^y- I 



o o t: 



w ■ 

©OS? 

■« a©-s^ 
o ft '^ ^n 

^ S f= © " 
=» s 3 i ft 



Q 3o 



S'S o ft 

nil 



s >>^ a © 



CD 



Sfti--5 

S^ ^ft ^ 

g ft o ft > 

2 c ^ ^ 
© a o'^O 



'^■^*r 






© -u © e8 

ft^C^O -u « 

^ S D © -^ 

S oT c o > 

eS 2 .ft o. fc< 






(ST3 

«« ft 

O c8 






da 



ft >^ 



2ffi« 



ft © OJ. 

^j= S -2 © 5 -g 
-c © <D fccx: s « ^ 



73 © ^ 0; 
^ ft J;^ «- 






'::'s§^a 



o ^ 

5 73 



^-2 






as •'-' 

> w 



•1^ 

•^ft 
o o 

<4hC 

ft !; 



;2.a 

5 CO 



imn-M ioi ;a^ 



eg-" S § =3 ft c 
a; © § J^ ©"-S.^ 

21 ft-H^ 2 § J 
sS O) - © r; o.^ 



i; i:^ ■ j= 



• 2 •« 



« 



-^-H. 



ft 

a a 



§-§<i^-^ fe ft g 

O < Q H 



t-, © 
o > 



ft © 

Wo 



Crrt 



ft -t> 

i-fi 

a © 



tl © "^ ^ 

• a 'gas a 

O Q 



T3 0) 
ft «> 



?" . S © 

be . 5 J 
.9 ® a 
"O .w © 

tl rc 

5 S » ^ 
> a-^.ft 
» a'n ^ 



^ © +j - 

o -*^«4i< ft 

a. 1) ?^ 

£'^^^^ 

O =8^-^ 



ftTJ 
•2 g 



© a; 
-^ 1 



5 . 



^^ 



^ ^ ^ s 



1 '^ 

<3 O 



t> tl 93 tl 

a) ® K-i 3J 

tl tl"— ' tl 

o o o 

CO "* o 

wo o 






S .• 



© © 

_o o 

S d 



O < 



58 



DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 







CQiM 


•^ 


C<1 






(N(M 


IM 


r-i 


% 


% 








m 


s 


A = 
< 


' 


' 


i> 




a 


CO 


d 








'H 




g 


— . 






f2 


tH 


< 


r 


= 






^ 



i 
i 

o 

o 

i 

M 



coo o 



I X 






is 



^ 









^ O 43^ 



tH CO 



^ ^ 



S^ §5 



eg . w 2 

o . I- O 

.2 o --H 

z ■ ~> ^ 

3 






o • £ ^ 

^ si. 



c3 2 fl 

^ a;- 

TS -^ -^ 
««« ■*^ 

cs o 2 

bn 



<1> 






o 6 _ 

^1^ S-r 



S » c3 =5 



if 8 1 



1^ 

O tH 

> 

bCrK 

;- o 



®.£ ceT3 

• u ^ o a o 
; S (- ® §^ 

2 xg^-s i'C 



So 



3 00 



=3 £ 

■-2 2 tn 

> 2.S 
s s 3 



^■5*0 
fi 2 I 

^§.2 



^ 53^ 



>>g o S §Eh 
v-3 H 



eg 3*^ ® CrH 

;: qj Q <p^^ 
Ex: ax: cj"" 



o 

11 

O 0) 



be 
OB 5 

o s 



|2i 
^ - 2 

m 



. 0302 
• ® > 

•x: o 

ill 

:^ a; 






£q 
x:.-t2 

• Oi rt 

QC CS 






O} 



2^ t*'- 

^ s? 2 
£-2 ^-2 

2.S c «^ 



0.2 -^ 
^ 









m 



1^ 



u u 



o o 






^ g ^ 



•jaquinsj 



SYNOPSIS OF RETURNS 



59 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

Index to Synopsis of Returns to Addresses and Orders of the House of Commons, 

Session, 1901. 



Mover. 


Reference Number. 


Mover. 


Reference Numbers. 


AncTBrs IVIr 


41. 

58. 

31, 38. 

13, 70. 

76. 

27, 28, 33, 52. 

15, 42, 43. 

20, 22, 51. 

63, 64, 72, 75. 

23. 

44, 53. 

66. 

57. 

34, 35, 60. 

47 

45 

6 

1 


Lefurgey, Mr . 


49. 


Tia.rtpr TVl r 


McLeod, Mr 


26. 


Bell, Mr., (Pictou) 

Birkett Mr 


Monk, Mr 


30, 65, 68, 69. 
37. 


Osier, Mr 

Prior, Mr 


Blair Mr 


29, 50. 
46. 


Borden, Mr. (Halifax). . . 

Bourassa, Mr 

Clarke, Mr 


Puttee, Mr 


Roche, Mr. (Marquette) 
Roche, Mr. (Halifax) . . 
Scott, Mr 


21, 40. 
54. 


Fisher, Mr 

Fortin M!r 


67. 


Sherrett, Mr 


61. 


Fowler, Mr 

German, Mr 


Sif ton, Mr . ... 


55, 56, 62, 71, 73, 74, 77. 
19. 


Smith, Mr. (Vancover). 
Sproule, Mr 


Hackett, Mr 


39. 


Haersrart, Mr 


Taylor, Mr 

Tapper, Sir C. H 

Turcot, Mr 


59. 


Hughes, Mr. (Victoria) . . 
Johnston, Mr. (Cape B'n.) 
*Kemp, Mr 


2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 14, 16, 17, 18, 

24, 25, 32, 36, 48. 
12. 


Wilson, Mr 


5, 7, 10, 11. 









60 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



appe:ndix d. 

Department _^"op the Secretary of State of Canada. 

Records Branch, January, 1902. 

To the Honourable 

The Secretary of State. 

Sir, — I have the honour to lay before you the following summary of the work per 
formed in the Records Branch of the Department of the Secretary of State, during the 
year 1901. The branch this year has been without the services of an old employee, who 
died on December 23, 1900, and has not been replaced. 

Section B. — Requisitions for documents and information, to the number of two 
hundred and fifty-two (252) have been received and acted upon during the year. The 
searches necessitated thereby amounted to one thousand two hundred and eighty-nine 
(1,289), of which nine hundred and eighty-five (985) were successful, and three hundred 
and four (304) without result. Of the printed documents asked, five hundred and thirty- 
one (531) were found and two hundred and forty-three (243) were not in the office. 
Files or information were furnished in four hundred and fifty-four (454) cases. Sixty- 
one (61) requests for the same could not be complied with, the information not being 
in the office. 

Section C. — In this section, in spite of several adverse circumstances, the classifying 
and the preliminary indexing in triple form of the old papers, have progressed satisfac- 
torily. Ten thousand seven hundred and ninety-four (10,794) papers and documents 
have been perused and indexed as regards names, subjects and localities. Thoy formed 
at the end of the year two thousand two hundred and forty-four (2,244) new files. 

This classification has brought to light, as in former years, a good many interesting 
papers, amongst which I may be allowed to mention the following : — Papers relating to 
an offer, in 1836, by " Le Seminaire de Montreal ", to change the tenure of land in the 
seigniory of Montreal, because feudal rights and especially Lods et Ventes were an 
obstacle to commerce. 

Reports by a commission appointed to study the working of penitentiaries in the 
United States, 1835. 

Papers relating to the suspension of Judges Bedard and Panet and that of Judge 
Vallieres de Saint Real, in 1838. 

Also representations by the latter on the subject of his having been sentenced to 
prison for contempt of court, by two justices of the peace, and the answer of the 
Governor, in 1834. 

Some papers relating to a new school system, (1840), and to the re-organization of 
the Royal Institution in 1826. 

The additions to the library during the year comprise four hundred and seventy- 
nine (479) books. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

A. AUDET, 
Keeper of the Records. 



LIST OF PASSPORTS 



61 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 



APPEISTDIX E. 

List of Passports issued from January 1 to December 31, 1901, 



Abbott, M. A. 


Keown, Miss M.'R. 


Agur, R. H. 


Kirouack, A. 


Ah Chen. 


Klock, Dr. W. H. 


Allan, J. B. 




Allison, J. W. 


Law, James, 


Angus, Miss M, 


Lawry, Mrs. T. 


Aronovich, J. 


Lee Bow, 




Lee Jim Yoo. 


Bailey, Miss J. 


Lee Kam. 


Bain, Hon. Thos. 


Lee Sing. 


Barker, Rev. F. F. 


Lepailleur, Rev. G. M. 


Barshel, J. F. P. 


Lighgow, J. T. 


Berube. Rev. A. P. 


Lingham, F. R. 


Berube, Rev. 0. 


Lovitt, F. 


Blair, Miss M. L. 


Lovitt, W. L. 




Lung, C. 


Charlie, Hing Ark. 


Lyman, F. G. 


Chinielinan, D. M. 




Chong Sing. 


Mah Tang, 


Clahung, M. K. 


Martin. E. S. 


Conrad, C. E. 


Mercier, H. 


Culver, Miss J. 


Meredith, C. 




Meredith, Mrs. E. H. 


Daly, Dr. 0. W. 


Mitchell, Mrs. E. 


Dawes, J. P. 


MacLean, J. B. 


Derick, Miss E. M. 


Macnee, A. F. 


Duggan, Mrs. E V. 


MacPherson, W. M. 


Duggan, Mrs. E. T. 


McClellan, J. 


Dupont, Rene. 


McLaren, J. B. 




McLennan, F. D. 


Ethier, Dr. J. S., M. A. 




Falconer, Miss J. A. 


O'Brien, Hon. Jas. 


Fitzgerald, E. G. 


Om Sing. 


Fook, B. Y. Sing. 


Oronhyatekha, Dr. 


Fong Hing. 




Ford, Rev. T. 


Phippen, J. G. 


Fortin, Mrs. A. 


Pickering, Rev. J. 


Foulds, J. G. 


Piddington, A. 


Frank, B. 


Piddington, S. 


Eraser, Miss H. A. 




Frew, Rev. R. 


Ramsay, W. M. 




Roe, Edward. 


Gardiner, C. C. 


Rosemoll, A. S. 


Gillis, Dr. B. D. 


Rosenburg, C. 


Girouard, H. H. 




Glickman, M. 


Sam Chong. 
Scheyer, H. S. 


Golberg, M. 


Goldboom, Mrs. S. 


Scott, G. W. 


Gordon, Mrs. A. E. 


Simpson, Dr. J. K. 


Goi don, Miss Lily. 


Sing Lee. 


Gouin, Hon. L. 


Sing Wa 


Gue, Charlie Lee. 


Smallman, T. H. 




Snasdell, J. S. 


Hague, Rev. D. 


Stanley, C. R. 


Hague, Geo. 


Stern, S. 


Hamel, Mrs. Geo. 




Hamilton, Mrs. M. 


Utas, Joseph. 


Hanks, C. W. P. 




Hart, W. D. 


WaFoo. 


Hetu, J. E. 


Weedman, B. 


Holt, A. E. 


Weir, W. H. 


Hop Lee. 


Williamson, E. J. 



Hosmer, C. R. 
Hauld worth, G. H. 

Jacksing, Wong. 
Jackson, Rev. W. P. 
Johnson. Mrs. W. 
Jones, Rev. Wm. 
JuHo. 



Wilson, A. W. G. 
Wong Foo. 
Wong Young. 
Wright. Miss E. 

Yee D.irk Ching. 
Yum Kue Wong. 



62 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



REGULATIONS RESPECTING PASSPORTS. 



1. Applications for passports should be made in writing and enclosed in a cover 
addressed to ' The Honourable the Secretary of State, Ottawa.' 

2. The charge for a passport, whatever number of persons may be named in it, is 
four dollars. The fee payable must accompany the application. Postage stamps will 
not be received in payment. 

3. Passports are granted only to British-born subjects, or to persons naturalized in 
the Dominion of Canada. A married woman is deemed to be a subject of the state of 
which her husband is for the time being a subject. Passports are not limited in point 
of time but are available for any time or for any number of journeys to foreign countries 
When the party is a naturalized British subject he will be so designated in his passport. 

4. Passports are granted to all persons either known to the Secretary of State or 
recommended to him by some person who is known to him ; or upon the application of 
any chartered bank in the Dominion of Canada ; or upon the production of a certificate 
of identity, which may be obtained at the department, signed by any mayor, magistrate, 
justice of the peace, minister of religion, physician, surgeon, solicitor or notary resident 
in the Dominion of Canada. In certain cases, the applicant's certificate of birth must 
be produced, in addition to the certificate of identity. 

5. If the applicant for a passport be a naturalized British subject, his certificate of 
naturalization must be forwarded to the Department of the Secretary of State, with the 
certificate of identity granted in his behalf ; and his certificate of naturalization will be 
returned with the passport to the person who may have granted the certificate of identity, 
in order that he may cause such naturalized British subject to sign the passport in his 
presence. 

6. A passport cannot be issued by the Department of the Secretary of State on 
behalf of a person already abroad ; such person should apply for one to the nearest 
British Mission or Consulate ; a passport cannot be issued abroad to a colonial natural- 
ized British subject, except for a direct journey to the United Kingdom or to the colony 
where he has been naturalized. 

7. The bearer of every passport issued by the Department of the Secretary of State 
should sign his passport as soon as he receives it ; without such signature either the visa 
may be refused, or the validity of the passport questioned abroad. 

8. Travellers who may have any intention of visiting the Russian Empire, the 
Turkish Dominions, the Kingdom of Roumania, or Persia, at any time in the course of 
their travels, should first have their passports vises at the nearest Russian, Turkish, 
Roumanian or Persian consulate as the case may be. The addresses in London of these 
consulates are respectively as follows: — The Russian Consulate, 17 Great Winchester 
Street, E.C. ; the Consulate General of the Sublime Porte, 29 Mincing Lane, E.C. ; 
the Roumanian Consulate-General, 68 Basinghall Street, EC. ; the Persian Consulate- 
General, 120 Victoria Street, S.W., or at any of the other consulates in Russia, Turkey, 
Roumania or Persia in the United Kingdom. Travellers about to proceed to any other 
country need not obtain the visa of the Diplomatic or Consular Agents of such country, 
except as an additional precaution, which is recommended in the case of passpoits of an 
old date. 



PASSPORT REQUIREMENTS OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES 63 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

N.B. — Although British subjects are now free to enter most Foreign Countries 
without passports, and the rules about passports have been virtually relaxed, neverthe- 
less colonial British subjects travelling abroad are recommended not to omit to provide 
themselves with passports, for even in those countries where they are no longer obligatory, 
they are found to be convenient as ofifering a ready means of identification, and more 
particularly when letters have to be claimed at a poste restante. For residence in 
Germany or Switzerland, a passport is indispensable. 

Note. — Naturalized British subjects should bear in mind that they are not entitled 
to British protection when within the limits of the Foreign State to which they originally 
belonged, unless they have ceased to be subjects of that State, in the manner pre- 
scribed by the laws thereof, or in pursuance of a treaty or convention to that effect. 



PASSPORT REQUIREME^^TS OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

Argentine Eepublic. — No regulations in force. Persons born in His Majesty's 
dominions should, if they intend to become resident, carry -Nvith them their certificates 
of birth, in order, if necessary, to obtain exemption from military service. 

Austria- Hungary. — Although passports are not legally necessary in every case, 
travellers are advised to carry them. For purposes of residence, a passport or other 
document to prove identity is necessary. 

Belgium. — It is desirable for travellers to possess passports. For purposes of resi- 
dence, registration at the Police Ofhce of the district is required, and a passport is 
accepted as evidence of identity. 

Bolivia. — See Peru 

Brazil. — Passports not actually required, but travellers are advised to carry them 
for purposes of identification. If intending to become resident, they should register 
their names and addresses at the nearest British Consulate. 

Bulgaria. — Travellers should carry passports of recent date. Bulgarian visa not 
required. Residents should provide themselves annually with certificates of registra- 
tion under the Ottoman Order in Council. 

Central America. — Possession of passports desirable both for personal security 
and purposes of identification. 

Costa Rica. — No regulation in force. 

Guatemala. — Alien residents are required to present at the Gautemalan 

Foreign Office passports vises by the Diplomatic or Consular officer in 

Guatemala of their native country. 
Honduras. — No regulations except in times of disturbance. 
Nicaragua. — No regulation in time of peace. To leave the country, a local 

passport has, however, to be obtained from the Ministry of War. 
Salvador. — Travellers should carry passports, and should, in addition, obtain 

passports from the Government of Salvador, (Charge for latter, 25 cents.) 

Chile. — No regulations in force. 



64 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

China. — Passports are not required at open ports. For travelling into the interior 
a special passport must be obtained from a British Consul, which is valid for one year. 
(Cost, 2 dol. 25 c.) 

Colomhia. — Passports not required for entrance to the country, but all British 
subjects should be provided with them if they intend to become resident for any length 
of time. Special regulations exist as to passports required from immigrants without 
resources. 

Corea. — Regulations similar to China. 

Denmark. — No regulations in force. But passports or similar documents may be 
required by the Police from persons accepting employment in Denmark, before furnishing 
them with an "opholdsbog" (situation book), or from music hall artistes. 

Iceland. — No regulations in force. 

St. Thomas. — No regulations in force. A local passport must, however, be pro- 
cured when leaving the island. 

Dominican Repuhlic. — Passport necessary. In order to leave the country, a Domi- 
nican passport must, in addition, be obtained, for which a fee of about £1 is charged. 

Egypt. — Passports not required by law, but travellers are advised to carry them. 
For travelling in other parts of the Ottoman Dominions, see Turkey. 

Ecuador. — See Peru. 

Fro.nce. — The possession of a passport may save inconvenience, since evidence of 
identity may at any time be required. 

For permanent residence, or to exercise profession or trade, a declaration must be 
made at the Mairie of the Commune within a few days of arrival. 

Algeria. — Regulations similar to France. 

French Guiana. — No regulations in force. Foreigners, on arrival, must register 
their names at the office of the mayor, for which a fee of 1 fr. is charged. 

Madagascar. — Travellers are advised to carry passports. 

Martinique. — Passports required by law, but law seldom enforced. 

New Caledonia. — Possession of passport desirable in view of existence of penal 
establishment. 

Reunion. — No regulations affecting Europeans in force. 

Saigon. — Ditto. 

Tahiti.— Ditto. 

Tunis. — Regulations similar to France. 

German Empire. — The possession of a passport is not obligatory, but as evidence of 
identity may at any time be required, it is very desirable for travellers, especially if they 
intend to reside for any length of time, to be provided with passports. Children sent 
to schools in Germany should carry passports. 

Greece. — No regulations in force, except as regards persons entering the country by 
the land frontier, who are required to be in possession of passports. 

Hayti. — A passport {vise hy a Haytian Consul) must, on arrival, be shown at the 
Port Office. It should also be produced and registered at the nearest British Consulate. 
On leaving the country, the visa of a British Consul and that of the " Commandant de 
la Place" (which costs about 2s.) must be obtained. 

Italy. — The possession of a passport is not obligatory, but travellers may at any time 
be required to give a satisfactory account of themselves, and to establish their identity. 

Japan. — Travellers are advised to carry passports. 



PASSPORT REQUIREMENTS OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES 65 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

Liberia. — No regulations in force, but a passport issued by the Liberian Secretary 
of State is required from residents leaving the country. For this, 50 cents is charged. 

Mexico. — No regulations in force. 

Montenegro. — No special regulations exist, but a passport properly vise is required 
for travelling through the surrounding Turkish and Austrian territories. 

Morocco, — No regulations exist. Any one wishing to travel into the interior should 
consult His Majesty's Minister at Tangier or the British Consul for the district through 
which his route lies. 

Muscat. — No regulations exist. Travelling in the interior is unsafe without an 
armed escort. 

Netherlands. — The possession of a passport is not strictly necessary, but is recom- 
mended for the purposes of identification. 

Dutch Guiana. — No regulations in force. 

Java, &c. — Travellers, on arrival, must register themselves at the Resident's 
Office. For travelling inland or in the neighbouring islands, or for resi- 
dence, a passport must also be obtained from the local authorities, 
respecting which the British Consul should be consulted. 

Paraguay. — Similar to Argentine Republic. 

Persia. — A passport bearing the visa of a Persian Consular officer must be produced 
on entering the country. 

Peru, Ecuador, and Bolivia. — A passport is not actually necessary, but it is desir- 
able to possess one in order to be able to obtain from a British Diplomatic or Consular 
officer the certificate of nationality required in the event of civil disturbances. 

Portugal. — Travellers are advised to provide themselves with passports. For 
residence, proof of nationality is required, and in travelling a passport may save^ the 
bearer much inconvenience. 

Azores. — Passports are not required except in times of public danger. 

Cape Verde Islands. — No regulations in force. « 

Loanda. — Passport necessary. 

Madeira. — No regulations in force. 

Mozambique. — Travellers should be provided with passports. 

Roumania. — Persons travelling to Roumania must be provided with passports 
bearing the visa of a Roumanian Consul in the United Kingdom. On arrival, they 
should at once obtain the visa of the British Legation or of a British Consulate, and 
then, within twenty-four hours of arrival, apply to the Roumanian authorities for a 
permit to reside in the country. For a stay of not less than eight days, this formality 
may be dispensed with, and the permit will be stated upon the passport by the police 
officials at the frontier. 

Russia. — Visitors to Russia must be provided with passports bearing the visa of a 
Russian Diplomatic or Consular officer. Without such visa, they will not be allowed to 
enter the country. To persons of the Jewish faith, the visa will not be granted unless 
they are bankers or persons of the highest social standing. 

The passport will enable the holder to reside in Russia for six months, when it 
must be exchanged at the Prefecture of St. Petersburg, or at the Chancery of a Provin- 
cial Governor, for a Russian " Billet de Sejour," to be renewed annually. 

The cost of such a "Billet de Sejour" varies from 7 r. 15 c. to 1 r. 29 c. Each 
" Billet de Sejour," on first issue of renewal, must be delivered to the local police officer 
for inscription or visa. For non-renewal of a ** Billet de Sejour " at the time of its 
expiration, a fine is exacted, 
29—6 



66 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

On leaving Russia a police certificate must be obtained, or, if resident more than 
six months, the 'Billet de Sejour' must be returned, when the passport will be handed 
back to the owner, with the necessary authorization to leave. 

Travellers to Russia should on each journey obtain a new passport to avoid the 
necessity of obtaining a 'Billet de Sejour' on arrival, which they will be required to do 
when a passport is used six months after the date of the Russian visa attached to it. 

Passports are not available for Russian Central Asia, to visit which British travel- 
lers must obtain special permission from the authorities of St. Petersburgh. 

Servia. — Travellers are required to produce passports on entering the country. 

Siam. — No special regulations in force, but British subjects are required to register 
themselves at the British Consulate-General within one month of arrival. For travel- 
ling in the interior a passport must be obtained from the Siamese Governm6nt. Fee 
for registration '2s. Qd.^ and for passport 2s. 

Spiin. — It is most advisable for travellers to be provided with passports. The 
visa of a Spanish Consul is not necessary, but will be found useful in travelling in pro- 
vincial towns and country districts. 

Canary Islands. — No regulations in force. 

Sweden and Norway. — No regulations in force. 

Switzerland. — A passport or similar document is necessary in order to obtain a 
' Permis de Sejour.' Travellers residing at hotels do not require to take out ' Permis 
de Sejour," but in every case the possession of a passport is advisable. Children «ent 
to schools in Switzerland should carry passports. 

Turkish Empire. — A passport bearing the visa of a Turkish Consular officer is 
required on entering the country. British subjects desiring afterwards to travel within 
Turkey must obtain a permit through a British Consul. On leaving Turkey the visa of 
a British Consul should be obtained. 

. Tripola. — Regulations similar to Turkey. 

United States. — No regulations in force. 
Cuba. — Travellers are advised to carry passports. 
Hawaiian Islands. — No regulations in force. 

Philippine Islands. — Travellers should carry passports. If travelling via Singa- 
pore the passport should be vis^ by the American Consul-General at that port. 
Porto Rico — Travellers are advised to carry passports. 

Uruguay. — Similar to Argentine Republic. 

Venezuela. — A passport or similar document to prove identity is required. 

Zanzibar. — No regulations in force. 



TARIFF OF FEES UPON LETTERS PATENT 67 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 

appe:ndix f. 

CANADA TEMPERANCE ACT. 

The only election under The Canadca Temperance Act during the year took place 
on the 20th June, in the County of Richmond, in the province of Quebec, upon a 
petition to revoke the by-law of March 14, 1877, passed under the Temperance Act 
1864 ("Dunkin Act), As a result the Act was defeated, the petition being adopted by 
a majority of 399. The vote was as follows : — For the petition, 1,609; against, 1,210. 

• AFPE:Nn)ix G. 

TARIFF OF FEES UPON LETTERS PATENT INCORPORATING COM- 
PANIES UNDER CHAPTER 119, REVISED STATUTES OF 
CANADA, 'THE COMPANIES ACT.' 

Whereas it appears advisable and in the public interest that the fees now payable 
for incorporation of companies under the provisions of The Companies Act (Revised 
Statutes of Canada, chapter 119) should be increased to an amount more nearly com- 
mensurate with the advantages conferred by the Dominion charters of incorporation, — 

His Excellency, in virtue of the provisions of section 84 of The Companies Act 
(Revised Statutes of Canada, chap. 119), and by and with the advice of the Queen's 
Privy Council for Canada, is pleased to order and it is hereby ordered, that the Order 
in Council of October 22, 1877, be and the same is hereby amended by the substitution 
of the following tariff of fees to be paid on application for Letters Patent in lieu of the 
schedule therein approved : — 

When the proposed capital stock of the Company is $1,000,000 

or upwards ^500 

When the proposed capital stock of the Company is $500,000 

or upwards and less than $1,000,000 300 

When the proposed capital stock of the company is $200,000 

or upwards and less than $500,000 , 250 

When the proposed capital stock of the company is $100,000 

or upwards and less than $200,000 200 

When the proposed capital stock of the company is more than 

$40,000 and less than $100,000 150 

When the proposed capital stock of the company is $40,000 or 

less than $40,000 100 

On application for Supplementary Letters Patent, other than those for increase of 
capital stock, the fee is to be one half of that charged on the original letters patent, and 
if such application for supplementary letters Patent be made by a company incorporated 
during the currency of the tariff of fees established by Order in Council of the 22nd 
October, 1877, the fee payable thereon shall be one half of that charged for original 
letters patent of the same class issued subsequently to the 22nd day of May, 1897. 
" When an increase of capital stock is applied for, the fee thereon shall be based upon 
the actual increase of the capital stock, and the fee payable shall be the same as is 
payable upon letters patent for the incorporation of a company whose capital stock is of 
the same amount as such increase." 

All fees must be paid in cash or by an accepted cheque made payable to the order 
of the Honourable the Secretary of State, and should be transmitted to him by 
Registered Letter. 



DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



APPENDIX H. • 

TARIFF OF FEES UPON LICENSES TO BRITISH AND FOREIGN COM- 
PANIES OR CORPORATIONS TO CARRY ON MINING OPERATIONS 
IN THE YUKON AND NORTH-WEST TERRITORIES. 

His Excellency, in virtue of the provisions of section 5 of chapter 49 of 61 Vic, 
' An Act to amend The Companies Act.' and by and with the advice of the Queen's 
Privy Council for Canada, is pleased to order and direct that the following tarifiP of 
fees shall be, and the same is hereby fixed and established as the tariff of fees to be 
paid on application for licenses by companies or corporations incorporated under the 
laws of the parliament of the United Kingdom, or of any foreign country intending to 
carry on mining operations in the Yukon District and North-west Territories, viz. : — 

When the capital stock of the company applying for a license 

is $1,000,000 $500 

For every additional million, $100 extra to be charged. 
When the capital stock of the company applying for a license 

is $500,000 or upwards and less than $1,000,000 300 

When the capital stock of the company applying for a license 

is $200,000 or upwards and less than $500,000 250 

When the capital stock of the company applying for a license 

is $100,000 or upwards and less than $200,000 200 

When the capital stock of the company applying for a license 

is more than $40,000 and less than $100,000 150 

When the capital stock of the company applying for a license 

is $40,000 or less than $40,000 100 



REGULATIONS AND TARIFF OF FEES UNDER LOAN COMPANIES ACT 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 



APPENDIX I. 

REGULATIONS AND TARIFF OF FEES UNDER THE ACT RESPECTING 

LOAN COMPANIES. 

At the Government House at Ottawa, 

Thursday, the 6th day of June, 1901. 

Present : 
His Excellency the Governor General in Council. 

The Governor General in Council is pleased, in pursuance of the 3rd section of the 
Act 62-63 Victoria, chapter 41, intituled " An Act respecting Loan Companies," to 
make the following regulations, and the same are hereby made and established 
accordingly : — 

Intending applicants for Letters Patent under this Act shall give two weeks 
previous notice in the Canada Gazette of their proposed application, stating therein : — 

{a.) The names in full and address and calling of the proposed Board of Directors, 
and with special mention of the names of not less than three of the applicants who are 
to be the provisional Board. 

(h.) The proposed name of the company, which shall not be that of any known 
company or partnership or individual or any name under which any known business 
is being carried on, or so nearly resembling the same as to be calculated to deceive or 
cause confusion. A subsisting name may, however, be given in whole or in part with 
the consent of the company or person entitled thereto, and the name of any existing 
company whose franchises and assets are to be acquired may be given to the applicants 
if the Governor in Council is satisfied that such company has the best right to that 
name. 

(c.) The place within Canada where the head oflfice of the company is to be 
established. 

'1;''^?,^ (c?.) The object for which incorporation is sought. 

^i'l^: (e.) The amount of the proposed capital stock, the number of shares and the 
amount of each share. 

At any time not more than two months after the last publication of such notice, 
the applicants may petition the Governor in Council, through the Secretary of State, 
for the issue of such letters patent. 

Such petition shall state the facts set out in the notice published in the Canada 
Gazette and shall be supported by affidavits or statutory declarations under the 
provisions of The Canada Evidence Act establishing : — 

{a.) That the proposed name is unobjectionable in the sense hereinbefore indicated. 

(6.) The sufficiency ot the notice required by the preceding regulations. 

(c.) The truth and sufficiency of the petition and of the facts therein set forth, 
including the verification of the signatures of the petitioners by an affidavit or statutory 
declaration made by the witness thereof. 

A Notary, a Justice of the Peace or a Commissioner authorized to receive 
affidavits, shall be competent persons before whom any affidavit, affirmation, or 
declaration required by this Act, or regulations made thereunder may be taken or 
made. 

The following shall be the schedule of fees payable for letters patent under this 
Act :— 

{a.) When the proposed capital stock is $100,000— 1200. 



70 DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

{h.) When the proposed capital stock is more than $100,000, and less than $1,000,- 
000, the fee to be $200, and two dollars and a half for every additional $10,000 or 
fractional part thereof in excess of $100,000. 

(c.) When the proposed capital stock is $1,000,000 the fee to be $500. 

{d.) When the proposed capital stock is over $1,000,000, the fee to be $500, and 
$5 for every additional $10,000, or fractional part thereof in excess of $1,000,000. 

No steps shall be taken in the Department of the Secretary of State towards the 
issue of any letters patent under this Act until the fee therefor has been paid. 

The Secretary of State shall be charged with the administration of this Act as far 
as the issue of Letters Patent thereunder is concerned. 

Upon the granting of letters patent under this Act, notice shall forthwith be 
given by the Secretary of State in the Canada Gazette, and the company to which such 
notice relates shall cause the same to be published on four separate occasions in at least 
one newspaper in the county, city, or place where the head office of the company is 
established. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clfrk of the Privy Council. 



TARIFF OF FEES UPON COMMISSIONS TO PUBLIC OFFICERS 71 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 29 



APPEISTDIX J. 

TARIFF OF FEES UPON COMMISSIONS TO PUBLIC OFFICERS 

APPROVED BY ORDERS IN COUNCIL OF FEBRUARY 19, 

1886, AND SEPTEMBER 7, 1893. 

. 1. Upon Commissions to Lieutenant Governors, Ministers of the Crown, Judges of 
all Courts, Junior Judges, Deputy Ministers and King's Counsel, a fee of $20. 

2. Upon Commissions issued to officers or others receiving salaries of $1,000 or 
over, a fee of $15. 

3. Upon Commissions issued to officers or others receiving salaries from $400 to 
$1,000, a fee of $8. 

4. Upon Commissions issued to officers or others receiving salaries from $100 to 
$400, a fee of $5. 

5. Upon Commissions issued to officers or others receiving a salary of $100, or to 
officers or persons appointed to office, who are paid by fees of office, a fee of $4. 

Upon Commissions to the Solicitor-General of Canada, and all officers in the 
service of the Crown who may receive a salary of three thousand dollars or upwards, 
a fee of $20. 

The above to apply to Commissions issued under the Great or Privy Seal. 

No commission or document to be delivered out of the Department of the Secretary 
of State until the fee, if any, has been paid thereinto. 

N.B. — No fee to be exacted upon commissions appointing Commissioners to make 
inquiries into matters affecting public interests. (O.C., December 5, 1891.) 



72 



DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 



APPENDIX K. 

List of the Officers, Clerks and Servants of the Department of the Secretary of State, 
with the Date of the First Appointment, Rank and Salary in each case. 



Name. 



Pope, Joseph, C.M.G . 



Pelletier, Philippe 

Colson, Frederick 

Emond, Gustave . . . 

Waters, J ohn Francis, M. A . . . . 

Roy, Henri 

Harrison, Edward 

Nicholson, M. Vernon C 

*roran, William 

Brophy, Arthur A - 

Steele, Evelyn Y 

Dube, L, J. Arthur . 

Baker, Frederick M 

fParad is, Eugene 



Rank. 



Under-Secretary of State and Deputy Regis- 
trar General of Canada 

Correspondence Branch. 

Chief Clerk 

First Class Clerk and Accountant 

First Class Clerk. . 

II 

Second Class Clerk 

Private Secretary to the Minister 

Junior Second Class Clerk . . ... 



Storr, Ira William 

Learoyd, Arthur Gilpin .... 
Kirwan, Philip Treacy ... , 

Drouin, Alphonse 

Arcand, Arthur 

McDonald, Donald D 

Aumond, Telraont . . 

Globensky, Lambert F Junior Second Class Clerk. 



Registry Branch. 



First Class Clerk 



Second Class Clerk 



Audet, Alphonse 

Audet, Frangois J . . 
Archambault, Alfred. 



Ricard, Urgel . 



Records Branch. 

Chief Clerk and Keeper of Records 
Junior Second Class Clerk 



Date of 

First 
Appointment. 



Dec. 3, 1878 



Mar. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Sept. 
May 
July 



July 
Jan. 
Nov. 
July 
Feb. 
Aug. 



Oct. 

Sept. 

April 

July 

Oct. 

July 

Aug. 



Salary. 



1, 1888 
20, 1885' 

8, 1880 

9, 1885i 
3, 1881 1 

30, 1882; 

10, 1879 

1, 1890; 

18, 1900 

19, 1897 i 
1, 18851 
1, 1890| 
7, 1891 

18, 1893 



20, 1873 

20, 1873 

10, 1878 

18, 1885 

1, 1890 

1, 1878 

1, 1883 

1, 1887 



Messenger. 



Messenger , 



Feb. 12, 1879 

1, 1888 

Aug. 31, 1891 



Dec. 20, 1886 



$ cts. 



3,200 00 



2,400 00 

1,800 00 

1,750 00 

1,700 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,300 00 

1,150 00 

000 00 

1,000 00 

850 00 

850 00 

800 00 



1,750 00 
1,650 00 
1,650 00 
1,500 00 
1,400 00 
1,400 00 
1,200 00 
950 00 



2,400 00 

1,000 00 

700 00 



530 00 



* Also receives $200 a year as Secretary to Board of Civil Service Examiners. fAlso receives $75 a 
year for clerical assistance to Secretary of Board of Civil Service Examiners. 



1-2 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 A. 1902 

THE 

CIVIL SERVICE LIST 

OF CANADA 

1901 



Containing the Names of all persons employed in the several Departments of the 

Civil Service, together with those employed in the two Houses of Parliament, 

on the 1st July, 1901, showing date oj first Appointment, promotion 

to present Rank, Age, and Salary in each case 

TO WHICH ARK ADDED 

TJie Civil Service Act " and amending Acts c. 12, 51 V., c. 12, 52 V., c. 14 
55-56 v., G. 18, 57-58 V., cc. Ih, 15, 58-59 V., c. U, 60-61 V., consolid- 
ated, and 63-64 V., c. 14; '* The Civil Service Superannuation Act"*"* 
as amended by c. 12, 56 Y., and c. 15, 60-6 1 Vi, consolidated ; 
the Civil Service Insurance Act, and the Act providing 
for the retirement of members of the Civil Service, Cap. 
17, 61 v., with an Analytical Index to each 



THE WHOLE ARRANGED AND PREPARED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE 

HON. THE SECRETARY OF STATE, PURSUANT TO SEC. 59 

OP " THE CIVIL SERVICE ACT " 




OTTAWA 

PRINTED BY S. E. DAWSON, PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST 

EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1901 

[No 30—1902.] 



1-2 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 



A. 1902 



INDEX TO SUBJECTS 



PAGE. 

Act, with Index. Civil Service 187 

Act, with Index. Civil Service Amendment. 213 

Act, with Index. Superannuation 219 

Act, with Index, Insurance 229 

Act with Index, Retirement 235 

Agriculture. Dept. of. 151 

Auditor General. Office of. 29 

Board of Civil Service Examiners 18 

Board of Customs 88 

Board, Dominion Lands 24 

Board of Steamboat Inspection 158 

British Columbia Penitentiary 14 

Cabinet. Members of the vi 

Canals. Officials and Employees 167 

Chancery. Clerk of the Crown in 2 

Chinese Immigration 33 

Civil Service Act, with Index 187 

Civil Service Amendment Act, with Index.... 213 

Civil Service Examiners. Board of 18 

Commons of Canada. Officers, &c., of the 

House of 181 

Commissioner for Canada in London, High.... vi 

Crown Timber Agents 24 

Customs. Board of 88 

Customs. Dept. of. 49 

Customs, Statistical Branch 88 

Deputy Heads of Departments vii 

Dominion Lauds Board 24 

Dominion Lands and Crown Timber Agencies. 24 

Dorchester Penitentiary 11 

Employees, index to the names of. 239 

Examiners. Board of Civil Service 18 

Exchequer Court, Officers of the 5 

Experimental Farms 152 

Finance. Dept. of 30 

Fish breeding 162 

Fisheries Inspectors 163 

Geological Survey Department 26 

Governor General and StaflF v 

Governor General's Secretary's Office 1 

High Commissioner for Canada in London, 

Office of. 3 

High Commissioner for Canada in London ... vi 

House of Commons. Officers, &c., of the 181 

Immigration Officers (Interior) 25 



PAGE, 

Indian Affairs. Dept. of 173 

Inland Revenue. Dept. of.. 34 

Insurance Act — with Index 229 

Intercolonial Ry. Officials 167 

Interior. Dept. of 20 

Justice. Dept. of. 4 

Kingston Penitentiary 6 

Land Board. Dominion 24 

Library of Parliament '. 184 

Lighthouse Service 158 

Manitoba Penitentiary 13 

Marine and Fisheries. Dept. of. 155 

Meteorological Service 157 

Militia and Defence. Dept. of. 16 

North-west Mounted Police 27 

Penitentiaries — Kingston 6 ; St. Vincent de 

Paul 9 ; Dorchester 11 ; Manitoba 13 ; 

British Columbia 14 ; Regina Jail 15 ; 

Prince Albert Jail 15. 

Police. North-west Mounted 27 

Ports, Customs inspectors of 89 

Post Office Dept 90 

City Post Offices 100 

Inspectors' Offices 97 

Railway Mail Clerks 135 

Prince Albert Jail 15 

Privy Council Office 2 

Privy Council for Canada. King's vi 

Public Printing and Stationery. Dept of 19 

Public Works. Dept. of 165 

Quarantine Officers 152 

Railways and Canals. Dept. of. 166 

Regina Jail 15 

Registrars of the North west Territories 25 

Retirement Act, with Index 235 

Secretary of State. Dept. of 17 

Senate of Canada. Officers, &c., of the 180 

St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary 9 

Steamboat Inspection. Board of 158 

Sugar (Board of Customs) 89 

Superannuation Act, with Index 219 

Supreme Court. Officersofthe 5 

Trade and Commerce. Dept. of 33 

Yukon Provisional District (Interior) 25 

Yukon District Customs 87 



1-2 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 A. 1902 



ISrOTICE 



Members of the Civil Service desirous of drawing attention to any errors in 
data respecting themselves which may have inadvertently occurred in the prepara- 
tion of this List, should communicate with the Deputy Heads of their respective 
Departments, not later than the 30th June next ensuing, with a view to the rectifi- 
cation of the same in future Lists. 



1-2 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 A. 1902 




THE GOVERNOR GENERAL. 

Governor General. — His Excellency the Right Honourable The Earl of 
MiNTo, G.C.M.G., &c., <fcc. 

Staff. 

Governor GejieraV 8 Secretary and Military Secretary. — Major F. S. Maude, C.M.G., D.S.O.* 
Coldstream Guards. 

Aide-de- Camp — 

Captain A. C. Bell, Scots Guards. 

Gomptroller of the Household. — Arthur Guise, Esq. 
Frivate Secretary. — Arthur F. Sladen, Esq. 



vi SECRETARY OF STA TE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

THE MINISTRY.* 

{According to Precedence.) 

The Right Honourable Sir Wilfrid Laurier, P.O., G.C.M.G', K.C., D.C.L. {Oxon.\ 
President of the King's Privy Council for Canada, First Minister. 

The Honourable Sir Richard John Cartwright, G.C.M.G., Minister of Trade and 
Commerce. 

The Honourable Richard William Scott, K.C, LL.D., Secretary of State. 

The Honourable David Mills, K.C, Minister of Justice. 

The Honourable Frederick William Borden, B.A., M.D., Minister of Militia and 
Defence. 

The Honourable William Mulock, K.C, M.A., LL.D., Postmaster General. 

The Honourable Sydney Arthur Fisher, B.A., Minister of Agriculture. 

The Honourable Joseph Israel Tarte, Minister of Public Works. 

The Honourable Richard Reid Dobell {without portfolio). 

The Honourable William Stevens Fielding, Minister of Finance. 

The Honourable Andrew George Blair, Minister of Railways and Canals. 

The Honourable Clifford Sifton, K.C, Minister of the Interior. 

The Honourable William Paterson, Minister of Customs. 

The Honourable James Sutherland (without portfolio). 

The Honourable Michel Esdras Bernier, Minister of Inland Revenue. 

The Office of Minister of Marine and Fisheries is vacant. 

{The above form the Cabinet.) 
The Honourable Charles Fitzpatrick, K.C, Solicitor-General. 



HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR CANADA IN LONDON. 

The Right Honourable Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal, G.C.M.G., LL.D. {Cantab.) 

♦ The Miniatry, High Commissioner, and chief officerg of the public geryice are given as at date of 
publication, December 1, 1901. 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 



CHIEF OFFICERS OF THE PUBLIC SERVICE. 



Clerk of the Privy Council, John Joseph McGee. 

Clerk of the Senate, Samuel Edmour St. Onge Chapleau. 

Clerk of the House of Commons, Sir John George Bourinot, K.C.M.Q,, LL.D., D.C.L. 

Governor General's Secretary, Major F. S. Maude, C.M.G., D.S.O. 

Auditor General, John Lorn McDougall, C.M.G., M.A. 

Deputy Heads of Departments. 

Deputy of the Minister of Finance, John Mortimer Courtney, C.M.G. 

Deputy of the Minister of Public Works, Antoine Gobeil. 

King's Printer and Controller of Stationery, Samuel Edward Dawson, Lit.D., F.R.S.C. 

Deputy of the Minister of Trade and Commerce, William Grannis Parmelee. 

Deputy of the Minister of Railways and Canals, Collingwood Schreiber, C.M.G., C.E. 

Deputy of the Minister of Justice, Edmund Leslie Newcombe, M.A., LL.B., K.C. 

Comptroller of the North-west Mounted Police Force, Frederick White. 

Deputy of the Minister of Agriculture and Statistics, William Bain Scarth. 

Under-Secretary of State and Deputy Registrar General, Joseph Pope, C.M.G. 

Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries, Franqois Frederic Gourdeau. 

Commissioner of Customs, John McDouqald. 

Deputy of the Minister of the Interior and of the Superintendent General of Indian 

Affairs, James A. Smart. 
Deputy Postmaster-General, Robert Miller Coulter, M.D. 
Deputy of the Minister of MiHtia and Defence, Lt. Colonel Louis Fhlix Pinault. 
Deputy of the Minister of Inland Revenue, William John Gerald. 
Director of the Geological Survey — Vacant. 



1-2 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 



A. 1902 



THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS 



CIVIL SERVICE OF CANADA 



THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SECRETARY'S OFFICE. 



Name. 



Jones, Charles Jerome, B.A. 
Walker, William Henry, B.A. 
Sladen, Arthur French 



Present Rank. 



Chief Clerk 

Ist Class Clerk 
do 



Pereira, Fredrick LinwoodjJr. 2nd Class Clerk. 

Clinton. i 
Rogers, Thomas iOrderly 



Date. 


Present 
Salary. 




$ cts. 


1 July '83 


2,400 00 


1 July '97 


1,700 00 


1 July '00 


1,450 00 


1 July '01 


650 00 


21 June '93 


560 00 



Date of 



I Date of 
j First Ap- 
! pointment. 



4 Dec. '47 

2 Oct. '64 

30 Aprir66 

22 Dec. '80 

27 Nov. '49 



17 Jan. '75 
1 Dec. '86 
1 Jan.;' 91 
1 Jan. '01 

16 Sept. '76 



30—1 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII.. A. 1902 



THE PRIVY COUNCIL. 



Name . 



Present Rank. 



McGee, John Joseph 

Boudreau. Rodolphe 

Bennetts. Francis Kent., 

Foley, James Gervais 

Lelievre. Simeon 

Baldwin. Robert Warren 

Burke. Denis 

Loux, William 

Wood, Ebin Burns 

Campbell, William W.... 
Chadwick, Francis John 

May, Henry Arthur 

McElroy, James 

Keating. Charles Joseph 
Kezar. George Gilbert.... 
Plunkett, Joseph Mary... 
Lothrop. Henry Webster 
Lemaire. Ernest Joseph . 
Macdougall, Gladwyn.... 

Boudreau. Rodolphe 

Lelievre, Simeon 

Macdougall, Gladwyn.... 

Chilton, Benjamin 

Burns, Lawrence 



Deputy Head, Clerk of 
the Privy Council. 

ChiefClerk,Asst.Clerk 
of the Privy Council. 

1st Class Clerk 



Date. 



do 

do 

2nd Class Clerk 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Jr. 2nd Class Clerk.. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Private Sec. to Minister 

Asst. Private Secretary 
to Minister. 
do do 

Doorkeeper& Messeng'r 

Messenger 



May '82 
July '00 
July '91 
Apr. '92 
July '97 
July '83 
July '93 
July '93 
Oct. '91 
July '93 
July '97 
May '84 
Dec. '87 
May '89 
July '92 
July '93 
Aug. '94 
Aug. '94 
July '01 



Present 
Salary. 



Nov. '98 
Oct. '94 



$ cts. 
3,200 00 

1,850 00 

1,800 00 

1,700 00 

1,700 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,350 00 

1,200 00 

1,000 00 

950 00 

1,000 00 

850 00 

850 00 

750 00 

700 00 

700 00 

200 00 

200 00 

200 00 

700 00 

560 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



6 Aug. '45 

17 Sept. '65 

25 Apr. '54 

21 Oct. '52 

3 Nov. '59 

3 Apr. '49 



1 July '79 
11 July '96 

1 July '75 
20 July '85 
27 July '82 

3 June '74 



16 Jan. 


'47 


1 July 


'93 


10 Oct. 


'52 


1 July 


'93 


21 Aug. 


'56 


— Mch. 


'68 


1 June 


'61 


1 July 


'93 


21 Mch. 


'49 


1 Aug. 


'94 


6 Aug. 


'65 


1 May 


'84 


11 Oct. 


'51 


17 Dec. 


'87 


19 Sept. 


'67 


1 May 


'89 


2 Jan. 


'70 


26 July 


'92 


22 Oct. 


'65 


1 July 


'93 


12 Aug. 


'75 


1 Aug. 


'94 


22 Oct. 


'74 


1 Aug. 


'94 


27 June 


'76 


1 July 


'01 


— Sept. 


'33 


14 Dec. 


'78 


18 Mch. 


'60 


17 Oct. 


'94 



Clerk of thb Crown in Chancery. 
Attached to the Privy Council OfiRce. 



Lamothe, Henri G 



.Chief Clerk, Clerk of 27 Jan. '00 
Crown in Chancery. 



2,400 00 



17 June '50 



1 Feb. '78 



CIVIL SERVICJft: LIST 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

OFFICE OP THE HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR CANADA. 

lY Victoria St., London, S.W., England. 



Name. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Oolmer, Joseph Grose, 

C.M.G. 
Reynolds, Arthur Williams. 



Secretary. 



Assistant Secretary and 
Acct, Ist CI. Clerk.. 

1st Class Clerk 



Just, Conradin Frederick ... 

Taylor, Christopher Joseph. 1st Class Clerk.. 

Luke, Edwin Philip.... 2nd Class Clerk. 

Allin, Thomas |3rd Class Clerk.. 



IJuly '88 

1 July '88 

1 July '93 

1 July '00 

1 July '00 

1 July '92 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 
3,300 00 

1,800 00 

1,800 00 

1,500 00 

1,150 00 

950 00 



Date 
of Birth. 



3 Jan. '56 

2 Feb. '58 

8 Nov. '56 
8 Aug. '61 

3 Nov. '68 
21 Aug. '70 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



■Mar, '80 
—Jan. '84 

1 Apr. '81 

30 May '82 

1 Oct. '87 

1 July '92 



30— U 



SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF JU3TIUE— INSIDE SERVICE. 



Name. 



Newcombe, Edmund Leslie, 

M.A., LL.B., K.C. 
Power, Augustus, B.C.L., 

K.C. 
Eraser, Geo. Levack Bower, 

B.A 



Present Rank 



Deputy Minister 

Chief Clerk 

-Barrister 



do 
at-Law 



Leslie, John 'Ist Class Clerk, 



Gisborne, Francis Hernaman' 1st Class Clerk— Barris- 

j ter-at-Law. 
nodgins,Wm. Egerton, M.A.j 1st Class Clerk—Barris- 

ter-at-Law 
C&te, Pierre Martial 1st Class Clerk. 



Chisholm, John. 



1st Class Clerk— Bar- 

rister-at-Law 

Blackadar, William Hill !2nd Class Clerk 



Narraway, Jas. Ephraim, 
B.A. 



MuUin, Jeremiah 

Burpee, Lawrence J. 



Verret, Hector Bacon. 



Clarke, John Duncan 



2nd Class Clerk and 

Accountant 

2nd Class Clerk 

Private Sec. toSol. Gen. 
2nd Class Clerk 



do 



Private Sec. toSol.Gen. 

^nd Class Clerk 

Private Sec. to Minister 



Harris, Robert Frederick 2nd Class Clerk 



Armstrong, Emma Maria. 

Morse, Frank A 

Pickens, Thomas 



Junior 2nd Class Clerk 

Messenger 

do 



Date. 



13 Mar. 
1 Jan. 

24 Oct. 
1 June 
1 July 

1 Jan. 

2 Mar. 
1 July 

12 May 

1 1 July 

1 Apr. 



7 May 
1 July 



1 do 
i'juiy 
1 do 
1 Aug. 
15 Nov. 



'93 

'79 

'89 

'82 

'83 

'86 

'95 

'01 

'89 

'92 

'95 

'97' 

'00 

'00" 

"oi" 

'GO 
'89 
'90 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 
4,000 00 

2,600 00 

2,400 00 

1,800 00 

1,800 00 

1,800 00 

1,800 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,300 00 

300 00 

1,150 00 

1,150 00 
300 00 

1,150 00 
600 00 

1,100 00 

700 00 
560 00 

480 00 



Date of 
Birth. 


17 Feb. 


''59 


22 Dec. 


'47 


14 Oct. 


'51 


10 Oct. 


'47 


19 May 


'58 


3 Oct. 


'51 


30 Apr. 


'61 


21 Sept. 


57 


29 Mar. 


'32 


11 June 


'57 


1 9 Jan. 
5 Mar. 


'65 
'73 


1 9 Feb. 


'74 


1 13 Aug.'54 
22 May '72 


15 June 


'65 


29 May 


'70 


22 Oct. 


'56 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



13 Mar. '93 

7 Dec. '74 

13 Sept. '76 

1 May '72 

13 Feb. '82 

1 Nov. '83 

11 Jan. '83 
1 Jan. '86 

12 May '80 
1 July '87 

1 July '83 
22 Oct. '90 

1 July '00 

1 July '00 
1 June '88 

1 July '00 

1 Aug. '89 

1 July '95 



Penitentiary Branch. 



Stewart, Douglas 
Dawson, Geo. W.. 



Foster, Geo. Laurenz | 

Lane, Hy. Bowyer Smith... 



Inspector of Peniten- 31 Jan 
tiaries. 

Inspector of Peniten- 
tiaries. 

1st Class Clerk and 
Acct. of Penitentiar's 

2nd Class Clerk 



'95 



6 June 01 

IJuly '83 
11 Aug. '74 
14 Oct. '91 



2,600 00 
2,600 00 

[ 1,800 00 
1,400 00 



20 June 


'50 


14 Feb. 


•58 


13 May 


'41 


12 Oct. 


'55 



9 Jan. '79 
6 June 01 

11 Aug. '74 
1 Mar. ' 79 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



THE SUPREME COURT/ 



Name. 



Present Rank. 



{jRegist. of Supr. Court 
jPub. and Editor Su 
! preme Court Reports 



Masters, Charles Harding, 

K.C. 
Coutlee, Louis "William 

Lawson, James 

Bligh, Harris Harding, K.C. 

Stewart, Miss H. E 

Davis, Rupert George 

O'Regan, James 

Curran, Francis 

Lynch, Joseph 



Chief Clerk and Repor- 
ter. 

1st Class Clerk and As- 
sistant ReT)orter. 

Registrar's Clerk 

Librarian 

3rd Class Clerk 

Secretary to C. J 

Assistant Librarian 

Usher and Messenger... 
2nd Messenger 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



2 July, 


'98 


O.C. 21June 
1884 


2 Oct. 


'95 


2 Dec. 


'95 


19 Feb. 


'96 


27 July 


'95 


31 Dec. 


'95 


27 July 


'95 


30 Nov. 


'92 


1 June 


'75 


- July 


'82 



$ cts, 
2,600 00 

600 00 

2,000 00 

1,500 00 

1,250 00 

1,200 00 

850 00 

1,100 00 

800 00 

630 00 

530 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 

First Ap- 

pointement. 



26 Mar. '52 
17 Dec. '51 
22 Feb. '55 

14 Apr. '42 

15 Feb. '70 
15 Sept. '57 
11 Dec. '59 
— Mar. '27 
13 Jan. '65 



2 July '98 

1 July '86 

2 Dec. '95 
1 Apr. '81 

26 July '92 
4 Nov. '90 
24 Mar. '93 
30 Nov. '91 
21 Feb. '65 
July '82 



THE EXCHEQUER COURT OF CANADA.' 



Audette,LouisArthur,LL.B. 



Morse, Charles, LL.B. ; 
D.C.L. 



McDonald, John. 
Clark, Duncan... 
Labelle, Wilfrid.. 



Registrar, Barrister-at- 
Law and Editor of 
Reports 



Deputy Registrar and 
Reporter (1st Class 
Clerk). 

Junior 2nd Class Clerk. 



do 
Messenger 



do 



8 Nov. '87 

I'juiy "'88' 

1 July '88 
13 Apr. '93 
5 Jan. '92 



[ 14 Dec. 



2,350 00 

■ " '56 
300 00 ■ ■ 
1,600 00 24 Dec. '60 



1,000 00 I 9 Jan. '54 
600 00 1 16 Nov. '65 
480 00 I 1 Nov. '70 



8 Nov. '87 
3 Mar. '88 

1 July '88 

27 Nov. '91 

1 Jan. '91 



* Under the supervision of the Minister of Justice. 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 
Kingston Penitentiary — Portsmouth, Ont. 



Name. 



Piatt, J. M.,M.D 

•O'Learj, D 

Phelan, D., M.D 

Creighton, R. R 

Cartwrightj Rev Conway E, 

McDonald, Rev. M 

Forster, J. R 

Hughes, William S 

Bowie, T. W 

Keenan, T. A 

Adams, Edwin J 

Derry, William H 

Baylie, Charles 

McDonald, Roderick 

Martin, C. H 

Gunn, William A , 

Thompson, Thomas 

Connor, Thos. P , 

Price, John 

Fahey, Rose Ann 

Smith, Mary 

Sullivan, Chas A 

Coward, William 

Young, Richard 

Pogue,Robert 

MoncrieflF, Peter 

Sherring, B. H 

McCangherty, John A 

Gordon, John 

Burns, Robt. J 

Gibson, Thos. W 



Warden 

Deputy Warden 

Surgeon 

Accountant 

Protestant Chaplain. 

R. C. Chaplain 

Warden's Clerk 



Present Bank. 



Date. 



17 May '99 
9 Aug. '97 
4 Aug. '97 

29 Dec. '92 
25 Oct. '75 

30 Sept. '99 
1 Jan. '98 



Chief Keeper & ClerkI 1 Jan. '96 

of Industries. 
Storekeeper 



Asst. Storekeeper 

Chief Trade Instructor. 

Engineer 

Electrician 

Asst. Electrician 

Steward 



Hospital Overseer and 

Schoolmaster. 
Asst. Hoshital Overseer 

and Schoolmaster. 
Supt. of Binder Twine. 

Asst. Supt. do 

Matron 

Deputy Matron 

Overseer Sewage W'rks 

Baker Instructor 

Mason do 

Shoemaker do 

Tinsmith do 

Stonecuttingdo 

Farm do 

Mason do 

Carpenter do 

Quarry , do 



5 Aug. '97 
4 Aug. '97 
1 Feb. '96 
1 Sept. '97 
1 Oct. '90 
1 June '94 

4 Aug. '97 
1 June '90 
I Mar. '96 
1 July '94 
1 July '94 

6 Mar. '86 
1 June '89 
1 July '96 
6 June '78 

22 Dec. '90 
1 Sept. '87 

5 Sept. '95 
I Oct. '94 

1 April '93 

2 Oct. '94 
1 June '95 
8 July '96 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 
2,600 00 

1,500 00 

1,800 00 

1,200 00 

1,200 00 

1,200 00 

800 00 

1,400 00 

900 00 

600 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

800 00 

500 00 

900 00 

800 00 

600 00 

1,500 00 

900 00 

600 00 

400 00 

550 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



18 Apr. '40 
15 Oct. '53 

8 Sept. '54 
29 Aug. '61 

15 May '37 

4 Aug. '53 

14 Aug. '75 
2 June '61 
6 Apr. '41 

16 Apr. '64 
26 Feb '61 

12 July '47 

19 Jan. '69 
8 Mar. '52 

5 Feb. '58 

16 Feb. '45 

17 Jan. '43 
2 Nov. '62 

16 Apr. '48 

15 Aug. '49 
4 Jan. '52 

25 Mar. '69 

19 June '55 

31 Oct. '50 

1 June '48 

6 Mar. '62 

13 May '51 

22 Dec. '65 

7 May '60 

23 July '55 
6 Nov. '57 



17 May '99 
j 9 Aug. '97 
I 4 Aug. '97 



1 Feb. '82 

!25 Oct. '75 

I 

,30 Sept. '99 

1 1 July '94 

I 
13 Jan. '93 

I 5 Aug. '97 

I 

:4 Aug. '9 7 

! 6 Apr. '94 

I 1 Sept.'9T 
1 Oct. '90 

I 1 June '94 
4 Aug. '97 
1 June '90 
1 Feb. '69 
1 July '94 
1 July '94 
6 Mar. '86 
1 June '89 
1 Jan. '94 
6 June '78 
6 Apr. '86 
1 Sept. '87 
1 Aug. '88 

22 Aug. '92 

1 Apr. '93 

2 Oct. '94 
1 June '95 
8 July '96 



* Inspector of Dominion Police, Dec. 2, 1882, to Aug. 6, 1897. 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 

SESSIONAL PAPEK No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE— OUTSIDE SERVICE 

Kingston Penitentiary — Continued. 



Name. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Walker, H. L 

Robinson, C 

*Weir, J. C 

Kennedy, John 

Atkins, Alexander 

O'Connor, Patrick 

jMacdonell, M. D. 0. 

Moore, Thomas 

Bostridge, Charles 

Rutherford, Jas. A.... 

Beaupre, Peter 

Bannister, John 

Doyle, James 

Madden, Patrick 

McConville, Arthur... 

Mooney, William 

Koen, Michael 

Fowler, Thomas 

Thompson, Andrew... 

Holland, William 

Davis, Ebenezer R 

Ryan, William 

Birmingham, J. R 

Givens, John 

Wheeler, Calvin S 

Johnson, Edward 

McCaulay, Geo., jun.. 
Hornibrook, Francis... 
Kenney, William 



Blacksmith Instructor., 
Tailor do 

Night Keeper 

Keeper 

do 



do (binder twi'e de- 
department) 

do (prison of isola- 
tion). 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Guard 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



July '97 
Aug. '99 
Mar. '01 
Sept. '95 
July '91 
Dec. '93 
Feb. '94 
Mar. '99 
Aug. '99 
Aug. '99 
Aug. '99 
Aug. '99 
Aug. '99 
Aug. '99 
July '85 
July '85 
July '86 
Aug. '89 
Aug. '89 
Aug. '89 
Feb. '90 
May '90 
Sept. '90 
June' 92 
July '92 
Aug. '92 
Aug. '92 
Sept. '92 
Mar. '93 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



$ cts 
700 00 

700 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

700 00 

700 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 



25 Mar. 

24 Sept. 

15 Oct. 

12 July 
— Apr. 

7 Aug. 

8 June 
8 Aug. 

20 Nov. 
17 Feb. 
29 July 

13 Sept. 

19 Oct. 
27 Apr. 

4 July 
1 Mar. 

25 May 
22 Mar. 

20 June 

26 Mar. 
29 Mar. 

14 Nov. 

16 Dec. 

6 June 

7 Oct. 

21 Nov. 
19 Sept. 

15 Dec. 

5 Nov. 



'65; 3 

invn; 



'50 
'50 
'52 
'57 
'53 
'46 
'44 
'48 
'51 
'60 
'51 
'60 
'64 
'62 
'58 
'42 
'64 
'50 
'50 
'50 
'53 
'58 
'66 
'52 
'51 
'63 
'55 
'58 



Apr. '97 
Aug. '99 
Oct. '76 
May '70 
July '78 
Dec. '82 
Sept. '76 
May '70 
Apr. =82 
Mar. '84 
Jan. '85 
Feb. '85 
May '85 
Aug. '89 
July '85 
July '85 
July ^86 
Aug. '89 
Aug. '89 
Aug. '89 
Feb. '90 
May '90 
Sept. '90 
June '92 
July '92 
Aug. '92 
Aug. '92 
Sept. '92 
Mar. '93 



• J. C. Weir, was appointed Guard, Oct. 31, 1876 ; appointed Steward, Sept. 1, 1881; removed 
Aug. 2,1897; appointed Guard, Aug. 1^ 1899. f Appointed Guard, Manitoba, Penitentiary, Sept. 
21, 1876; removed from office Sept. 9, 1892; appointed to present oflBce on above date. 



SECRET A RY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 

Kingston Penitentiary — Continued. 



Name. 



Present Rank. 



O'Neil; John 

Bennett, James 

Corby, R 

Hughes, John 

McCormack. Samuel .... 

Marsh, G. H. T 

HennessY, Thomas H 

Greer. Samuel James. .. 
Carrigan, William Neil. 

Dowsley, Richard B 

Bryant, R 

Reid, Thos 

Sullivan, Geo 

Reid, M. P 

Eccles, Victor 

*Tobin, Thomas 

Matthews, W. H 

McWaters, Jas 

Saunders, Jas 

Franklin, J. C 

Germain, D 

Irwin, R 

Seymour, J , 

Penning. C. H 

McQuade, J 

fPatterson, Robt , 

Calvert, W.J 

'Walsh, Edw 

Watts, S. N 



Guard 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do .... 

do 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

Fireman. 

do . 

do . 

Guard.... 

do .... 

do ... 

do .... 

do .... 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 
Birth. 



Feb. '94 
Feb. '94 
May '94 
Feb. '95 
July '95 
Sept. '95 
Sept. '95 
Oct. '95 
Jan. '96 
May '96 
Jan. '98 
Jan. '98 
Aug. '98 
Aug. '98 
Sept. '98 
Mar. '99 
Aug. '99 
Aug. '99 
Aug. '99 
Aug. '99 
Aug. '99 
Sept. '98 
Jan. '99 
Aug. '99 
Dec. '99 
May '00 
Nov. '00 
Nov. '00 
Nov. '00 



$ CtS.j 

500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 jSO 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 GO 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 



Dec. '60 
Jan. '54 
May '69 
Nov. '69 
Nov. '55 
Aug. '66 
Nov. '61 
Mar. '59 
Aug. '74 
Dec. '58 
Feb. '72 
Nov. '71 
Apr. '75 
Jan. '71 
May '65 
Nov. '49 
Oct. '65 
Sept. '61 
Nov. '59 
May '75 
Apr. '70 
Oct. '67 
Dec. '67 
July '60 
June '59 
Apr. '49 
Sept. '66 
Sept. '78 
Apr. '66 



Date of 

First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 Feb. '94 

14 Feb. '94 
7 May '94 

22 Feb. '95 
26 July '95 

25 Sept. '95 

26 Sept. '95 
1 Oct. '95 
1 Jan. '9(? 

6 May '96 
1 Jan. '98 
1 Jan. '98 

13 Dec. '94 

15 Dec. '97 

7 Mar. ^98 
1 Sept. '87 
1 Aug. '99 
1 Aug. '99 
1 Aug. '99 
1 Aug. '99 
1 Aug. '99 
1 Sept. '98 

10 Jan. '99 
1 Aug. '99 
1 Dec. '99 
7 Aug. '94 
I Nov. '00 
1 Nov. '00 
1 Nov. '00 



♦Dismissed Aug. 22, 1898; reappointed temporary Guard Sept. 13, 1898 
Guard March 1, 1899. 

t Retired Apr. 1, 1900; reappointed May 23, 190C 



appointed permanent 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE- OUTSIDE SERVICE. 
Kingston Penitentiary — Concluded. 



Name. 


Present Rank. 


Date. 


Present 
Salary. 


Date of 
Birth. 


Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 




Guard.. 


1 Nov. '00 

1 Nov. '00 

1 Nov. '00 

19 Feb. '01 

30 June '98 

30 June '98 

30 June '98 

IMay '84 


% cts. 
500 00 

500 00 

5)0 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

600 00 


17 May '71 
iJB Nov. '69 

7 Apr. '78 
4 Jan. '67 

'46 

6 Apr. '54 
4 Aup:- '56 

18 Apr. '57 


1 Nov. '00 




do 


1 Nov. 'GO 


Davis R M 


do 


1 Nov. '00 


McCarthy, D. J 

Tobin, Michael 


do 


19 Feb. '01 


Stable Guard 


7 Dec. '91 


Stover Philip 


do 


1 Sept. '94 
4 May '96 
1 Apr. '72 


Weir, James 


Stable Guard 









Saint Vincent de Paul Penitentiary — Saint Vincent db Paul, P.Q. 



* Duchesneau, Dr. J. A 

Beauchamp, Oscar 

Fortier, L. A., M.D 

Malepart, Geo. Stanislas 

Harel, Rev. Lazare Olivier... 

Rollit, Rev. John 

Lachapelle, Emile 

Lamarche, Geo. Bricot 

Fatt, H. Cecil 

Chartrand, Ubald .. 



Pratt, Geo. A 

Charbonneau, Napoleon 

Champagne,Eug. Ferdinand 

Dorais, John 

O'Shea, David 

Leclair, E 

Dorais, Jos. Theodore |School Instructor. 

Kennj', Edward Farm Instructor ... 

O'Borne, Dolphus Trade Inst., Mason 

Rochon, Aristide.. do Bakery 

Lortie, Vincent I do Shoem; 



Warden 

Deputy, Warden 

Surgeon 

Accountant 

R. Catholic Chaplain. 
Protestant Chaplain.... 

Warden's Clerk 

Storekeeper 

Assistant Storekeeper., 
Chief Keeper 



Chief Trade Instructor 

Steward 

Engineer 

Electrician 

Hospital Overseer 

Fireman 



13 April 


'98 


17 Feb. 


'99 


13 Apr. 


'98 


1 June 


'82 


27 Apr. 


'87 


25 Oct. 


'95 


9 May 


'98 


1 Mar. 


'80 


IDec. 


'99 


8 Apr. 


'99 


19 Feb. 


'99 


30 June 


'88 


IFeb. 


'90 


27 May 


'01 


24 Jan. 


'90 


25 Dec. 


'98 


24 July 


'82 


1 Jan. 


'76 


22 June 


'82 


IMay 


'94 


15 July 


'95 



2,400 00 


1,500 00 


1,600 00 


1,200 00 


1,200 00 


1,200 00 


700 00 


900 00 


500 00 


1,200 00 


1,500 00 


800 00 


900 00 


800 00 


750 00 


500 00 


800 00 


700 00 


700 00 


700 00 


700 00 



8 Sept. '32 

22 June '51 
18 Aug. '34 

23 May '49 
30 Aug. '47 

9 Apr. '41 

27 Oct. '60 
23 Apr. '42 
14 Apr. '69 

1 Jan. '43 

28 Nov. '62 
20 June '47 

ODec. '53 

2 Apr. '76 
2 Mar. '60 

20 May '71 
16 Oct. '43 
16 May '51 
4 Dec. '43 
20 Oct. '42 
14 Feb. '54 



15 Dec. '75 
17 Feb. '99 
13 Apr. '98 
21 Sept. '80 
27 Apr. '87 
25 Oct. '95 
9 May '98 

20 May '73 

21 Aug. '94 
1 Jan. '78 

19 Feb. '99 
1 July '73 
IFeb. '90 

27 May '01 

23 Aug. '82 
25 Dec. '98 

24 July '82 
1 Jan. '76 
1 June '77 
1 Mar. '82 

15 July '95 



* Removed from office January 24, 1881, re-appointed April 13, 1898. 



10 



SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 

Saint Vincbnt db Paul Penitentiary — ContiQued. 



Name. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



Provost, W 

Lacasse, G. R 

Picard, E 

Bisson, Vincent 

Leblanc, E 

Cadieux, Oscar 

Taillon, Charles... 

Gibson, William W 

Chartrand, Gilbert 

Lemay, Jean-Baptiste... 

Nixon, George 

Fitzgibbon, John D 

Charbonneau, George.. 

Desjarc'.ins, Joseph 

Lawlor, James 

Blondin, Paul 

Plouffe, Anloine 

Lesage, Felix '. 

Bertrand, Elzear 

Cbarlebois, Isidore 

McLellan, D. J 

Roger, Hilaire 

Clermont, Felix 

I 
Charbonneau, Jean-Bte '\ do 

Desjardins, Abondius ! do 



Trade Inst., Quarry 

do Carpenter 

do Stonecutter 
do Tinsmith. 

Blacksmith Instructor. 

Tailor do ... 

Messenger 

Night-keeper 

Keeper 

do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
Guard, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Depres, Michel 

Lynch, Patrick John Geo.. 

Letang, E 

Sigouin, H 



do 
do 
do 
do 



G.ece, W do 



Clermont, C. 
Forster, P 



do 
do 



1 Oct. '96 
1 June '99 
1 June '99 
IFeb. '00 
1 Apr. '01 

8 Apr. '01 
1 May '94 

11 Oct. '97 

IMar. '87 

30 June '88 

21 Aug. '95 
11 Oct '97 
24 Apr. '99 
24 Apr. '99 

1 Feb. '00 
1 Feb. '00 

14 June '83 

29 Aug. '83 
1 Aug. '85 
4 May '87 

16 Aug. '88 
1 Jan. '89 

19 July '89 

22 Apr. '91 

9 Nov. '93 
1 May '94 
1 May '94 

27 Aug. '94 
7 Mar. '97 
1 Oct. '97 

13 Oct. '97 
9 Nov. '97 



$ cts. 
700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

500 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 CO 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



18 May '60 

14 Oct. '44 
20 Sept. '57 

24 June '50 
20 Mar. '61 

11 Aug. '64 
18 Aug. '38 
23 Oct. '43 

6 July '41 
2 Aug. '38 

22 Oct. '46 

23 May '60 
13 July '46 
23 Mar. '76 

15 Apr. '69 
2 Oct. '69 
9 Apr. '46 

10 July '45 
9 Feb. '59 
8 Jan. '46 
1 Dec. '55 

20 Nov. '40 

17 June '63 
26 June '51 

7 June '63 

18 Oct. '66 

16 Feb. '70 

25 Aug. '58 
6 Apr. '73 

16 Mar. '63 
15 Oct. '76 

12 Oct. '74 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 Oct. '96 
: 1 July '78 
! 1 June '99 

12 July '84 
1 Apr. '01 

8 Apr. '01 
1 May '80 
6 Aug, '86 
1 July '76 
1 June ' 78 

6 Aug. 83 
25 June '87 
30 June '88 

1 Oct. '97 

18 Sept. '96 

19 Oct. '96 
14 June '83 
29 Aug. '83 

1 Aug. '85 

4 May '87 

16 Aug. '88 

1 Jan. '89 

19 July '89 

22 Apr. '91 

9 Nov. '93 
1 May '94 
IMay '94 

27 Aug. '94 

7 Mar. '97 
1 Oct. '97 

13 Oct. '97 
1 Sept. '89 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 

Saint Vincent dk Paul Pbnitentiasy— Concluded. 



11 



Name. 



Normand, L 

Peloquin, H 

Charbonneau, A. 

Jolicoeur, E 

Pepin, A 

Forest, G 

Desjardins, C 

Gagnon, L 

Trudeau, A 

Leonard, H 

Boucher, E 

Papineau, 

Keiley, J 

Taillefer, 

Ambrose, P 

Desormeau, F 

Filiatrault, N 

Miller, H 

Aube, V 

Cloutier, J 

Ouimet, D 



Present Rank. 



Guard, 
do 
do 
do 

do . 

do , 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do , 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 
do 

do . 

do . 

do , 

do . 



IS table Guard. 



do 



Date. 



7 Mar. '98 
7 May '98 
1 July '98 
1 Aug. '98 
1 Aug. '98 
1 Jan. '99 
1 Jan. '99 
1 Jan. '99 
17 Apr. '99 
17 Apr. '99 
17 Apr. '99 
20 Apr. '99 
1 June '99 
5 Dec. '99 
9 June '00 
1 Feb. '01 
1 May '01 
1 July '01 
1 July '01 
1 June '99 
1 Jan. '99 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 
Birth. 



$ cts. 
500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

400 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 



13 Sept. '65 
30 Oct. '60 

1 July '62 

13 Apr. '63 
15 July '70 

14 Mar. '57 

2 Apr. '71 
5 Sept. '55 

21 May '64 
27 Feb. '64 

3 Nov. '61 

22 Nov. '64 
25 Apr. '56 

23 May '73 
1 Sep. '73 

17 Jan. '58 
3 July '68 

20 Mar. '72 
5 Oct. 73 

25 Dec. '43 

15 Nov. '62 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



3 Nov. '97 
7 May '98 
1 July '98 
1 Aug. '98 
1 Aug. '98 
1 Jan. '99 
1 Jan. '99 
1 Jan. '99 

17 Apr. '99 

17 Apr '99 

17 Apr. '99 

20 Apr. '99 

1 June '99 

5 Des. '99 

9 June '00 

1 Feb. '01 

1 May '01 

1 July '01 

1 July '01 

4 Nov. '81 
1 Jan. '99 



Dorchester Penitentiary — Dorchester, N. B. 



•Kirk, John Angus |Warden 

Pipes, Arthur B Deputy Warden 

Doherty, Edward P., M. D... Surgeon 

fGray, John Andrew Accountant 

Campbell, Rev. John Roy... Protestant Chaplain.... 
Cormier, Rev. Andre David. {Roman Cath. Chaplain 
Landry, Ferdmand A Storekeeper 



12 Dec. 


'99 


6 June 


'01 


22 Jan. 


'01 


1 Sep 


'80 


1 Oct. 


'83 


1 Dec. 


'89 


1 Jan. 


'98 



2,000 00 1 Mar. '37 

1,500 00 31 Mar. '53 

I 

1,400 00 18 Oct. '61 

1,200 00 30 May '53 

600 00 7 Aug. '41 

600 00 27 Nov. '54 

700 00 28 Jan. '43 



12 Dec. '99 

25 June '89 

22 Jan. '01 

1 Sept. '80 

1 Oct. '83 

1 Dec. '89 

15 Nov. '86 



•Immigration agent at Halifax from Julv 1. 1897, to Dec. 12, 1899. 
t In Customs service from Dec. 1, 1879,'to Sept. i, 1880. 



12 



SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 

Dorchester Penitentiary — C ontiaued. 



Name. 



Present Rank 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap. 
pointment. 



Macleod, Wm. John 

Piercy, James A 

Hutchinson, Leonard S. 

Papmeau, Gordon B 

McMahon, Elizabeth 

Camming, Elizabeth 

Downey, John 

Tattrie, Nathan 

Chambers, Lorenzo H.... 

McDougall, John 

Burns, Wm. Robert 

♦McDonald, Angus M..., 

Lawrence, Willard 

Hogan, William 

Godsoe, Henry 

Alexander, William 

Lane, James A 

McDougall, James 

Carcoran, John 

Colburn, Robert 

Luther, James 

Leblanc, Joseph 

Allain, Adolphus 

Gillespie, T. Frank , 

Burden, Nicholas A 

M..Donald, Augus A 

McCaull, John 

Elsdon, Charles S 

McDougall, Sinclair 

Brown, Arthur 

Drillio, George 



Steward 

Engineer 

Chief keeper 



Hospital Overser and 

Schoolmaster 

Matron 



do 
do 
do 
do 



Deputy Matron , 

Blacksmith Instructor. 

Shoemaker do 

Carptr. 

Mason 

Tailor 

Baker 

Night keeper. 

Keeper 

do 

do 

do 

Messenger 

Guard 

do 



do 
do 
dp 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



1 Jan '98 
12 May '85 
1 May '01 
1 Jan. '98 
1 May '99 

8 Feb. '00 
1 May '68 
1 Sept. '77 
1 Dec. '00 
I Dec. '00 

10 May '91 
1 Nov. '94 
1 Apr. '01 
1 July '97 
1 July '97 
I Jan. '98 
1 July '01 
1 July '83 
1 July '80 
1 Jan. '82 

9 May '82 
1 May '83 
1 Dec. '83 
1 Oct. '92 
1 Feb. '93 
1 Feb. '93 

23 July '94 

23 July '93 

23 July '95 

1 Jan. '98 

1 Jan. '98 



Resigned March 31, 1894 ; appointed Baker Instructor Nov. 



% cts. 
700 00 

900 00 

800 00 

800 00 

500 00 

400 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

550 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

1, 1894. 



7 Aug. '68 
15 Aug. '52 

18 Oct. '74 
22 June '56 

7 Apr. '70 

8 Jan. '48 
17 Mar. '40 

3 Apr. '44 
20 Apr. '53 

6 May '61 
14 Mar. '58 

26 Nov. '65 
14 May '49 

17 Apr. '43 
25 Dec. '33 
31 Aug. '46 
14 Oct. '43 

19 July '41 
12 Apr. '47 
10 July '56 

1 June '40 

29 June '49 

1 Feb. '55 

3 July '73 

25 July '52 

27 Feb. '66 
i Mar. '50 

4 Sept. '69 

18 Oct, '71 

26 Sept. '64 

27 Apr. '65 



1 Jan. '96 

12 May '85 

1 Feb. '93 

1 Jan. '86 

21 Jan. '98 

8 Feb. '00 
1 May '68 
1 Sept. '77 
1 May '86 
5 Apr. '91 

10 May. '91 
1 June '91 

27 Sept. '99 
1 Jan. '69 
1 Aug. '69 
1 July '80 
1 July '80 
1 Jan. '73 
1 J^ily '80 
1 Aug. "81 

9 May '82 
1 May '83 

10 July '83 

18 Oct. '91 

1 Oct. '92 

1 Feb. '93 

23 July '94 

23 July '95 

23 July '95 

1 Jan. '98 



1 Jan. '98 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 

SESSIONAL PAPER Np. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTIOE-OOTSIDE SERVLCE. 

Dorchester Penitentiary — Concluded. 



la 



Name. 



DeForest, John H 

Gotson, Stephen H 

McLeod, John 

Connell, Patrick 

McDonald, Lauchlin 

Palmer, Samuel 

Robinson, Amos 

Milton, John S 

Walsh, Thomas 

Belliveau, Dominic P 

Irvine, Acheson Gosford 

Manseau, Amedee 

Neill, Robert Weir 

Finn, Rev. Francis M 

Cloutier, Rev. Gabriel 

Mustard, John 

Power, Benjamin Franklin. 

Freeman, Edward 

Beaupre, Joseph Octave 

Smith, John 

Lusignan, Elie 

Farquhar, David 

Grahame, William R 

Miller, Thomas 

Mercer, Frank 

Harris, Edward 

Addison, George 

Eddies, William 

McFarlane, Peter 

Sutherland, Donald Gunn.. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 



Date of 
Birth. 



Guard 

do :. 

do 

do . 

do 

do 

do 

Stable Guard. 

do 

Fireman 



I Jan. '98 
1 Jan. '98 
1 Jan. '98 

15 Feb. '99 
1 June '01 
1 July '01 
1 July '01 
1 July '98 
1 July '98 

14 Jan. '01 



500 00 
500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 OU 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 



26 June 'TO 

3 Feb. '73 

20 Sept. '60 

6 Aug. '49 

28 July '76 

19 June '58 

22 Aug. '58 

22 Nov, '53 

1 Jan. '59 

28 Jan. '60 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 Jan. '98 
1 Jan. '98 
1 Jen. '98 
1 July '80 
I June '01 
1 July '01 
1 July '01 
1 May '94 
1 Dec. '9e 
14 Jan. '01 



Manitoba. Penitentiary. 



Warden 

Deputy Warden 

Surgeon 

Protestant Chaplain ... 

Roman Catholic Chap 

lain. 
Accountant 



Storek' per and Steward 
Assistant Steward 



Hospital Overseer and 
Schoolmaster. 

Engineer and Black- 
smith. 

Instructor, Carpenter.. 



do 


Mason 


do 


Fanner 


do 


Shoemaker. 


do 


Tailor 


Keeper ... 




Guard 


do 


■ 
do 


do 



Oct. 


'92 


2,200 00 


Sept. 


'98 


1,500 00 


Sept. 


'00 


1,500 00 


Mar. 


'98 


800 00 


Feb. 


'98 


800 00 


July 


'94 


1,100 00 


July 


'94 


950 00 


Dec. 


'99 


650 00 


Nov. 


'92 


900 00 


Nov. 


'89 


1,000 00 


April 


'92 


700 00 


Mar. 


'93 


1,000 00 


Oct. 


'93 


700 00 


July 


'95 


700 00 


May 


'99 


700 00 


Jan. 


'99 


600 00 


Oct. 


'85 


650 00 


Aug. 


'85 


650 00 


Feb. 


'88 


600 00 


Dec. 


'88 


600 00 



7 Dec. 


'37 


14 Jan. 


'58 


24 May 


'69 


9 Feb. 


'32 


IFeb. 


'51 


12 June 


'44 


14 June 


'46 


12 May 


'56 


2 July 


'59 


8 Dec. 


'48 


11 May 


'52 


15 Feb. 


'49 


19 Oct. 


'60 


17 Dec. 


'57 


27 Feb. 


'45 


15 July 


'67 


15 May 


'38 


17 July 


'58 


29 Mar. 


'54 


6 Mar. 


'50 



iMay '70 
1 July '91 

12 Sept. '00 
1 Mar. '98 
4 April '83 

16 April '83 

18 Feb. '92 
1 Feb. '86 

28 July '85 
10 Dec. '83 

1 April '92 

13 Mar. '83 
1 July '91 

10 Nov. '92 
30 May '99 

10 Nov. '95 

29 Sept. '81 

19 Aug. '85 
1 Feb. '88 

11 Dec. '88 



14 



SECBETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 

Manitoba Penitentiary— Concluded. 



Name. 



Gingras, Charles ... 
Bourke, Edmund.... 
Gillies, Andrew, jr. 

Ward, Alfred 

French, W. H , 

Hogue, Joseph 

Douglas, Thomas... 

Chapman, T. A 

Fletcher, A. J 

Abbott, R 

Smith, W. J 

Gunn, A. M.. 

Shead, Wm Henry.. 



Present Rank. 



Guard.... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 

do .... 
Fireman. 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



1 Feb '91 
1 Sept. '91 
1 Mar. '98 
1 May '98 
4 April '99 

11 May '99 
1 June '99 

17 July '99 

12 Sept '99 
16 Sept. '99 
16 Sept. '99 

9 May '00 
1 May '98 



Date of 
Birth. 



$ cts 
600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 



2 Jan. '64 

2 Mar. '67 

9 Oct. '65 

6 June '58 

24 Mar. '73 

13 Nov. '74 

8 Feb. '69 

27 June '71 

10 May '75 

11 Oct. "73 
27 Mar. '64 
21 Jan. '67 

4 June '69 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 Feb. '91 
1 Sept. '91 
1 Mar. '98 
1 May '98 
4 April '99 

11 May '99 
1 June '99 

17 July '99 

12 Sept. '99 
16 Sept. '99 
16 Sept. '99 

9 May '00 
1 May '98 



British Columbia Penitentiary. 



Whyte, J. C 

♦Bourke, D. D 

Scouler, Rev. Thos 

DeVriendt, Rev. Chas. 
Smith, W. A. DeWolf. 

Harvey, J. W 

Burr, Benjamin 

Robertson, R. J , 

Carroll, W. J 

Mackenzie, George 

Coutts, Alexander 

Martin, John 

Atchison, J. N 

Disney, H.. 

McNiven, John 

McKee, H 



Warden 

Deputy Warden 

Protestant Chaplain... 
Rom. Cath. Chaplain 
Surgeon 



Accountant and Ward 

en's Clerk. 
Storekeeper 



Steward. 



Hospital Overpeer and 

School Instructor. 
Trade Instructor 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Keeper. 



27 Nov. 


'96 


1 Apr. 


'96 


1 Jan. 


'97 


13 Jan. 


'99 


30 June 


'90 


27 Feb. 


'96 


1 May 


'99 


1 Oct. 


'95 


1 Oct. 


'95 


1 Nov. 


'93 


1 Oct. 


'86 


11 Oct. 


'00 


9 Aug. 


'98 


1 Mar. 


'95 


1 Oct. 


'95 


2 Oct. 


'95 



2,000 00 
1,500 00 
800 00 
800 00 
600 00 
1,200 00 
800 00 
800 00 
800 00 
750 00 
750 Oo 
700 00 
700 00 
700 00 
700 00 
600 00 



2 Aug. 


'61 


15 Aug. 


'45 


10 July 


'43 


7 Apr. 


'61 


6 Oct. 


'59 


23 Feb. 


'56 


26 Mar 


'44 


28 Jan. 


'65 


15 Mar. 


'60 


4 July 


'52 


13 Sept. 


'50 


20 Apr. 


'72 


14 May 


'68 


17 Dec. 


'66 


6 May 


'56 


24 May 


'49 



27 Nov. '96 

23 July '86 
1 Jan. '97 

13 Jan. '99 
1 Nov. '87 

29 June '95 
1 Oct. '88 

11 Oct. '87 

23 July '86 
1 Nov. '83 
1 Oct. '86 

11 Oct. '00 
9 Aug. '98 
1 Mar. '95 
1 June '89 
7 Nov. '84 



* Appointed Deputy Warden of Manitoba Penitentiary, Oct. 13, 1892. 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE-INSIDE SERVICE. 
British Columbia Penitentiary — Concluded. 



15 



Name. 



Stewart, F 

Doyle, James 

Smyth, Patrick 

Sampson, Tbomas... 

Patchell, W. A 

Atkins, R. J 

Dynes, R 

McNeill, A 

Lobb, Thos. J 

Walsh, William 

Sainsbury, R. J 

Walmsley, Edward. 

Imlah, John 

Lavelle, M 

Devine, P 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Present 
Salary, 



Guard 1 Apr. '85 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



1 Oct. '86 

21 Feb. '79 

1 Apr. '90 

18 Aug. '90 

1 Sept. '92 

\ Jan. '94 

29 Jan. '94 

] Oct. '95 

1 June '96 

1 Apr. '99 

10 May '99 

15 May '00 

9 Mar. '01 

8 Apr. 01 



$ cts. 
600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 



Date of 
Birth 



16 Aug. '52 
8 Mar. '62 

17 Mar. '43 
25 May '59 

12 Aug. '62 
3 Dec. '60 

31 Oct. '67 
17 Jan. '62 
31 May '57 
14 Feb. '64 

13 Dec. '72 
8 Feb. '70 

20 July '60 
17 June '67 
30 July '75 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 Apr. '85 

1 Oct. '86 

21 Feb. '79 

1 Apr. '90 

18 Aug. '90 

1 Apr. '85 

1 Jan. '94 

29 Jan. '94 

1 Oct. '95 

1 June '96 

1 Apr. '99 

10 May '99 

15 May '00 

9 Mar. '01 

8 Apr. '01 



Regina Jail — Rkgina, N.W.T. 



Maclvor, Wm. U. 



Edwards, Oliver Cromwell.. 

M.D. 

Black, John George 



McDougall, John 

Matheson, Elizabeth.... 
McDougall, Archibald. 
Dunnett, Alex. Budge. 



Jailer 

Surgeon 

Dep. Jailer and Bursar. 

Fireman 

Acting Matron 

Turnkey 

do ...; 



15 June 


'01 


1 Aug. 


'97 


15 Aug. 


'97 


15 Aug. 


'97 


3 Feb. 


'01 


1 Oct. 


'96 


1 June 


'98 



1,000 00 


360 00 


800 00 


500 00 


200 00 


500 00 


500 00 



14 Aug. 


'52 


12 Sept. 


'50 


29 Aug. 


70 


16 Oct. 


•57 


1 Aug. 


'63 


27 April 


'61 


12 Aug. 


'61 



15 June '01 
1 Aug. '97 
15 Aug. '97 
15 Aug. '97 
3 Feb. '01 
I Oct. '96 
1 June '98 



Prince Albert Jail — Prince Albert, N.W.T. 



Kerr, F. W 

Savard, Joseph 

Rorafif, Jos 

Montgomery, Mary... 
Reid, H. A. L., M.D. 



Turnkey and Fireman. 

Turnkey, &c 

Matron 

Surgeon 



27 June 


'01 


1 May 


'98 


1 Apr. 


'00 


13 Oct. 


'98 


10 Not. 


'98 



I 

600 00 
600 00 
400 00 
240 00 



3 Jan. 


'58 


15 Aug. 


'55 


27 Nov. 


'65 


21 Apr. 


'63 


14 Oct. 


'68 



21 May '98 

1 May '98 

1 Apr. '00 

13 Oct. '98 

10 Nov. '98 



16 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE— INSIDE SERVICE. 



Name. 



Present Rank. 



Pinault, Col. Ls. Felix 

Macdonald, Col. Donald A.. 

Borden, J. W 

Suite, Benjamin 

Benoit, Major Alphonse 

Aumond, Wm. Henry 

Holt, Edmund Burnham 

Weatherbe, Major Paul.. 

Jarvis, Ernest F 

Guy, Lt.-Col. George 

Lane, Henry David James... 
Donaldson, Lt.-Col. Jas.Ball 

Brown, H. W 

Clarke, Patrick 

Aldrich, Frederick Ernest P. 

•Bliss, Major L. D. C. F 

Knight, Francis Edward 

Lemieux, Emile Edmond 

Foley, Lawrence 

Maunsell, Capt. G. S 

Beard, Frank 

McCann, John A 

Panet, Charles L 

fWinter, Major Charles Frs.. 
Davidson, William James... 

JYoung, G.W 

Tooley,E. R 

Watterson, A. E 

Lambert, A. 

Brown, H. W 

Casault, Napoleon 

Verreault, Eugene 

Courtman, John 



Deputy Minister of Mil 
itia and Defence. 

Chief Clerk and Chief 
Supt. of Stores. 

Chief Clerk, Accoun 
tant. 

Chief Clerk 



Chief Clerk, Secretary. 

Ist Class Clerk 

do 



1st Class Clerk, Chief 

Engineer. 
1st Class Clerk 



Date. 



do 
do 
do 
do 

2nd Class Clerk. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



2nd Class Clerk, Asst, 

Engineer. 
2nd Class Clerk 



do 
do 
do 



Junior 2nd Class Clerk 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

PrivateSecretary to the 

Minister. 
Messenger 



do 
do 



7 Dec. '98 

8 Nov. '97 
25 Sept. '97 

1 July '89 

1 July '00 

1 July '89 

7 Mar. '94 

22 Feb. '97 

1 July '97 

''l July '98 

1 July '00 

1 July '00 

1 July '01 

1 July '89 

1 July '89 

18 June '94 

20 Jan. '94 

25 July '94 

30 Dec. '95 

1 July '97 

1 July '97 

1 July '00 

1 Aug. '00 

1 Aug. '95 

1 July '86 

1 Aug. '94 

1 July 'Oi 

1 July '01 

1 July '01 

30 July '96 

7 Aug. '67 

29 Jan. '82 

1 Jan. '93 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 
3,200 00 

3,000 00 

2,400 00 

2,100 00 

2,050 00 

1,800 00 

1,600 00 

1,500 00 

1,650 00 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,300 00 

1,250 00 

1,200 00 

1,150 00 

1,200 00 

1,150 00 

1,150 00 

1,300 00 

1,000 00 

700 00 

800 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

560 00 

560 00 

560 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



9 Nov. '52 
31 Oct. '45 
10 Oct. '56 

17 Sept. '41 

14 Sept. '42 

15 Jan. '40 
2 June '40 

18 Nov. '69 

16 Sept. '51 
7 Apr. '38 
7 Oct. '49 
5 Aug. '42 

1 Jan. '68 

17 Mar. '32 

2 May '54 
27 Oct. '61 
21 June '50 

14 May '63 
4 July '55 

2 July '65 
26 Sept. '68 

26 Aug '54 

15 Dec. '70 

3 Feb. '63 

18 Feb. '47 

27 Mar. '60 

4 Aug. '72 
27 Jan. '74 
30 Aug. '78 

1 Jan. '68 
15 June '41 
29 June '51 
20 Mar. '54 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



7 Dec. '98 

1 Nov. '73 

25 Sept. '97 

19 Nov. '67 

1 July '73 

6 Mar. '67 

23 May '82 

22 Feb. '97 

23 Mar. '81 
16 Mar. '64 . 

1 Dec. '67 

1 Sept. '82 

30 July '96 

22 May '77 

1 May '82 

1 Apr. '82 

15 Feb. '84 

1 July '83 

5 Aug. '85 

2 Mar. '95 

6 Aug. '89 

1 July '90 

2 Der. '89 
9 Sept. '83 
1 July '86 
1 Aug. '94 
1 July '01 
1 Aug. '94 
iJuly '01 

30 July '96 
1 Nov. '38 

29 Jan. '82 
1 Nov. '83 



*Deputy Asst. Adjt. General, Apr. 4,'96, to Dec. 15,'99, and re-appointed 2nd class clerk Dec. 16,'97. 
f Transferred from Department of Inland Revonue. 
i Died, July 10, 1901. 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



17 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE— INSIDE SERVICE. 



Name. 


Present Rank. 


Date. 


Present 
Salary. 


Date of 
Birth. 


Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 


Pope, Joseph 


Under-Secy. of State & 
Deputy Registrar Gen. 


1 May '96 


$ cts. 
3,200 00 


16 Aug. '54 


3 Dec. '78 



Correspondence Branch. 



Pelletier, Philippe Chief Clerk— Barrister- 

at-Law. 

Colson, Frederick 1st Class Clerk and Ac- 
countant. 

Emond, Gustave 1st Class Clerk 



Waters, John PrauciS; M.A.. do 

Roy, Henri 2nd Class Clerk. 



Harrison, Edward 

Nicholson, M. Vernon C, 

fForan, William 

Aumond, Telmont 



do 
do 
do 
do 



CO 

Private Secretary. 



Brophy, Arthur A 

Steele, Evelyn Yelverton Junior 2nd Class Clerk. 

Dube, Louis Joseph Arthur.. do 

Baker, Frederick M do 

*Paradis, Eugene do 



18 



Mar. 


'88 


July 


'88 


Aug. 


'91 


July 


'92 


July 


'89 


July 


'90 


Aug. 


'90 


Aug. 


'94 


July 


'96 


July 
Jan. 


'GO 

'97 


Oct 


'86 


July 


'90 


Feb. 


'91 


Aug. 


'93 



2,400 00 

1,800 00 

1,750 00 

1,700 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,300 00 

1,200 00 

1,150 00 

600 00 

1,000 00 

850 00 

850 00 

800 00 



20 Feb. '49 

23 July '54 

21 Oct. '62 
21 Oct. '55 
19 Apr. '60 

24 May '52 
10 July '46 

8 Feb. '71 
15 Sept. '48 

I 19Feb.'7l 

8 Mar '58 
18 Sept. '64 
15 Aug, '97 

4 Oct. '72 



1 Mar. '88 
20 Jan '85 

8 Dec. '80 

9 Sept. '85 
3 May '81 

30 July '82 

10 July '79 

1 July '90 

1 July '83 

19 Jan. '9T 

1 Nov. 'SS- 

1 July '90 

7 Feb. '9L 

18 Aug. '93. 



Registry Branch. 



Storr, Ira William ..1st Class Clerk. 

Learoyd, Arthur Gilpin do 

Kirwan, Philip Treacy i do 



31 Aug. '91 
1 July '93 
1 July '93 
1 July '87 
1 July '90 

31 Au;?. '91 
Globeusky, Lambert F 'Junior 2nd Class Clerk 1 Aug. '87 



Drouin, AlphonseM. P 1st Class Clerk, Engros- 

j ser 

Arcand, Arthur. i2nd Class Clerk, En- 

I grosser 

McDonald, Donald D |2nd Class Clerk.... 



1,750 00 
1,650 00 
1,650 00 



1,400 00 

1,400 00 

950 00 



17 Sept. 


'47 


15 June 


'53 


29 Sept. 


'50 


29 June 


'51 


16 April 


'63 


7 Feb. 


'48 


3 Sept. 


'55 



20 Oct. '73 

20 Oct. '73 

10 Sept. '78 

18 April'SS 

1 July '90 

1 Oct. '78 

4 Aug. '87 



t Is also Secretary to the Board of Civil Service Examiners. 

* Also receives $75.00 a year for clerical assistance to Secretary of Board of Civil Service Examiners. 



30- 



18 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE— INSIDE SERVICE. 

Records Branch. 



Name. 



Present Rank. 



Audet, Alphonse Chief Clerk and Keepe 

of Records 
Audet, Fran9ois Joseph 



Archambault, Alfred. 



Junior 2nd Class Clerk 
do 



Date. 



6 June' 83 

1 Feb. '88 

31 Aug. '91 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 
2,400 00 

1,000 00 

700 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



14 Nov. '40 
29 July '67 
11 May '67 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



12 Feb. '79 

1 Feb. '88 

31 Aug. '91 



Messexgers. 



Ricard, Urgel 



Messenger 



20 Dec. '85 



500 00 ;27 July '57 



20 Dec. '85 



Board of Civir. Service Examiners 
Sapervised by the Secretary of State. 



•Thorburn, John,M.A.,LL D 


ChairmanBoard ofCivil 
Service Examiners. 


24 July '82 


400 00 


10 Oct. "30 


24 July '82 


fDeCelles, Alfred Duclos.Lit 

D..F.RS.C. 
IIGlashan, John C, LL. D... 


Civil Service Examiner 
Civil Service Examiner 


24 July '82 
21 Sept. '95 


400 00 
400 20 


13 Aug. '43 
23 Jan. '44 


24 July '82 
21 Sept. '95 


IForan William 


Secretary to the Board. 


2 Nov. '97 


200 00 


8 Feb. '71 


1 July '90 





* Is also Librarian of Dept. of Geological Survey. 

f Is also General Librarian of Parliament. 

X Inspector of Public Schools for the City of Ottawa. 

X Is also 2nd Class Clerk in the Department of the Secretary of State. 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



19 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY— INSIDE SERVICE. 

Supervised by the Secretary of State. 

King's Pbintbr's Office. 



Name. 



Diwson, S. E., Lit. D., 
F.R.S.C. 

Grison, Louis Armand. 

Farrell, Frank J 

Allen, Harry 

Gliddon, William 

Barrette, Joseph Gilbert 

Frigon, Jos. Arthur 

Andrews, George 

Bronskill, F. G 

Gouldthrite, Frank Slocum.. 

Larochelle, Norbert 

Walsh, William 

Patenaude, J. 

Beaulieu, A. H 

Hughes, John 

Proulx, Isidore 

Beahen, Dennis 

Hutchinson, G. S 

Clancy, Thos 

Foran, John 

Andrews, Geo. P 

McMahon, William 

Potvin, Auguste 

Snow, Alfred T 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Deputy Head, King's 
Printer and Control- 
ler of Stationery. 

2nd Class Clerk 



do 
Messenger , 



T Nov. '91 

1 July '90 

1 July '01 

1 Jan. '80 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 
3,200 00 

1,400 00 

1,100 00 

560 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 June '33 

9 Apr. '31 
17 June '55 
12 Jan. '47 



7 Nov. '91 

1 July '76 

1 Aug. '94 

1 Jan. '74 



Accountant's Branch. 



Chief Clk, Accountant 

2nd Class Clerk 

do 

Junior 2nd Class Clerk 
do do 



5 Mar. 


'88 


I July 


'90 


1 July 


'01 


7 Jan. 


'84 


1 July 


'00 



2,400 00 


1,400 00 


1,100 00 


1,000 00 


650 00 



18 Mar. 


'33 


26 Feb. 


'63 


27 Not. 


'65 


25 Aug. 


'48 


11 Feb. 


'76 



1 Oct. '71 

27 Aug. '86 

30 Apr. '88 

5 Dec. '83 

4 Feb. '91 



Stationery Branch. 



1st Class Clerk and 

Sunt, of Stationery. 

2nd Class Clerk 

do 

do 

do 

Junior 2nd Class Clerk 
do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

Caretaker of Bureau ... 

Packer and Messenger.. 



Mar. 


'99 


July 


'88 


July 


'90 


Mar. 


'99 


July 


'01 


Feb. 


'88 


July 


'90 


Aug. 


'91 


July 


'00 


July 


'00 


July 


'90 


Aug. 


'91 



1,550 00 


1,400 00 


1,400 00 


1,150 00 


1,100 00 


1,000 00 


850 00 


850 00 


650 00 


650 00 


700 00 


530 00 



2 Nov. 


'63 


9 Apr. 


'51 


1 Aug. 


'32 


20 May 


'67 


2 Mar. 


'47 


28 Mar. 


'46 


29 Jan. 


'69 


3 Feb. 


'60 


20 June 


'72 


2 Dec. 


'72 


17 Mar. 


'43 


28 Dec. 


'72 



— Dec. '78 
1 June '82 
1 Jan. '76 

14 Dec. '88 
5 Sept '81 
1 June '70 
8 May '89 
3 Dec. '83 
1 July '00 

18 Jan. '99 
1 June '82 
1 Feb. '87 



PuiNTiNG Branch. 



Chief Clerk and Supt. 

of Printing. 
1st Class Clerk 



2nd Class Clerk... 



1 July '93 
1 Aug. '94 
1 July '01 



2,150 00 I 9 May '56 
1,600 00 I 3 May '39 
1,100 00 6 Nov. '58 



11 July '88 

7 Dec. '69 

8 Mar. '89 



30—2^ 



m 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR— INSIDE SERVICE. 



Name. 



Smart, James Allan.. 

C6te, Jofeph Arthur 

May, Kathleen Maud Weir 

Collier, Allan Percy 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Deputy Minister 

2nd Class Clerk 

Junior 2nd Class Clerk 

2nd Class Clerk and 
Private Secretary to 
Minister of Interior. 



1 Apr, .'97. 

25 July '94 

1 May '91 

1 July '01 
2Y Nov. '96 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 
3,200 00 

1,350 00 

900 00 

1,100 001 
600 00 j 



Date of 
Birth. 



Q June '58 

24 Nov. '62 

8 Feb. '63 

26 Aug. '73 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 Jan. .'97. 
23 Oct. '82 
19 Oct. '83 

27 Nov. '96 



Law Clerk's Office. 



Rothwell, Thomas Gainsford 
Barber, Beatrice 

Keyes, Perley George 

Pereira,Lyndwode Charles ] 

Rogers, Christop. Chapman 

Chisholm, Arthur 

Sparkes, George Angove 

Southwell. 
Capreol, Frederick Chase ... 

Belleau, M. A. R. Eugene ... 

Yeilding, Annabella Blan- 

nerhassett*}. 
Scott, Beresford 



Chief Clerk, LawClerk 
3rd Class Clerk 



1 July '97 
1 May '91 



2,400 00 
850 00 



1 Feb. '52 
11 Mar. '67 



1 Jan. '83 
16 Feb. '85 



Secretary's Branch. 



Chief Clerk, Secretary 

1st Class Clerk and 
Assistant Secretary.. 

2nd Class Clerk 

do 

do 

Junior 2nd Class Clerk 

do 

do 

do 



Jan. 


'00 


July 
June 


'89 
'89 


July 


'78 


June 


'83 


July 


'90 


Feb. 


'84 


June 


'85 


Sept. 


'91 


Oct. 


'00 



2,400 00 

1,800 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

897 00 

600 00 



15 Feb. 


'53 


19 Feb. 


'52 


24 Nov. 


'40 


11 Nov. 


'50 


21 May 


'64 


17 Oct. 


'60 


21 Aug. 


'58 


2 Mar. 


'50 


27 Aug. 


'78 



17 July '78 
1 Jan. '83 

26 Sept. ' 70 

7 Jan. '74 
3 May '81 

24 Apr. '82 

1 June '94 

— Mar. '80 

8 Aug. '93 



CIVIL SERVICE LISI 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OP THE INTERIOR— INSIDE SERVICE. 
Topographical Sueveys Branch, 



21 



Name. 



Present Rank. 



Deville, Edouard Gaston 

Daniel. 
King, Wm. Frederick 

Klotz, Otto J 

White, James 

Clayton, Frank 

Whitcher, Arthur Henry 

Symes, Peter Barclay 

Rauscher, Rudolph E. F 

Brady, Martin 

Topley, Horatio Needham... 

Steers, Connell John 

DeTEtoile Joseph 

Sowter, Thomas Walter E... 



Date. 



ChiefCl'k&Surv.Gen 

do and Chief j 

Astronomer. i 

Chief Clerk & Astron 
omer. 

Geographer 



1st Class Clerk 

do 

do 

2nd Class Clerk 

do 

do 

do 

Junior 2nd Class Clerk 

do do 



1 Jan. '85 
1 July '90 
1 July '96 
1 July '99 
] June '82 
1 July '90 
1 July '90 
1 July '89 
1 July '89 
1 Aug. '94 
1 July '98 
1 July '79 
1 Apr. '82 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 
2,600 00 

2,250 00 

2,050 00 

1,850 00 

1,800 00 

1,800 00 

1,750 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,250 00 

1,250 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



21 Feb. '49 
19 Feb. '54 
31 Mar. '52 

3 Feb. '63 

22 Dec. '47 
10 Apr. '40 

24 Sept. '47 
2 Oct. '34 

13 Nov. '56 

25 June '47 
10 July '49 

1 Nov. '47 
9 Oct. '60 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



jl3 June '81 
13 June '81 

'79 

28 Jan. '84 
5 Apr. '72 

8 May '72 
1 June '70 
1 Sept. '69 
5 Mar. '79 

25 Apr. '87 
1 July '73 

9 Sept. '71 
28 Feb. '80 



Land Patents Branch. 



Goodeve, William Morgan... 

C6te, Narcisse Omer 

Wallis, Brown 

Gliddon, Wm. Searle 

Newcomb, George H 

Sherwood, Henry 

Paterson, Geo. Washington. 
Low, Philip de Villen^uve... 
Cuming, F. Wm. Chambers. 

Lemieux, Guillaume 

Macdonald, Frederic C.,B. A. 

Pereira, Godfrey P 

Coleman, Miss L 

Wright, B. H 

Fortier, F. P. Edmond 

McNeill, A. T, B. A 



Chief Clerk I 

1st Class Clerk 

2nd Class Clerk 

do 

do 

Junior 2nd Class Clerk 

do do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



1 Jan. '85 
30 Jan. '92 
1 June '82 
1 July '90 
1 July '93 
1 July '82 
1 July '79 
1 May '91 
1 Dec. '86 
1 May '91 
1 May '91 
14 Oct. '91 
21 July '91 
1 July '01 
1 July '01 
1 July '01 



2,400 00 


1,650 00 


1,400 00 


1,400 00 


1,400 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


900 00 


900 00 


850 00 


800 00 


600 00 


600 00 


600 GO 



6 Jan. 


'49 


14 Sept. 


'59 


21 June 


'34 


7 Apr. 


'58 


13 Aug. 


'47 


8 Aug. 


'55 


6 Aug. 


'58 


23 Oct. 


'52 


17 May 


'62 


15 Aug. 


'58 


10 Jan. 


'62 


17 Oct. 


'57 


7 Jan. 


'65 


6 Apr. 


'72 


16 Nov. 


'78 


14 Nov. 


'72 



8 Feb. '66 

1 July '78 

1 May '73 

1 Jan. '74 

1 Feb. '73 

26 Apr. '80 

1 Aug. '76 

13 Mar. '82 

15 Jan. '82 

10 Apr. '86 

1 July '85 

1 Mar. '88 

1 June '89 

7 Mar. '93 

— Mar. '01 

1 July '01 



SECRETARY OF STATE. 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR— INSIDE SERVICE. 
Accounts Branch. 



Name. 



Beddoe, Charles Henry... 
Hume, Herbert Elsworth 

Robertson, Peter 

Dunnet, James... 

Marchand, Pierre 

Turner, Henry Hamish.. . 
Pope, George Dalrymple 
Willoughby, Samuel J... 

Lewis. Rowland A 

Morisset, A. R 

Robeatson, Wm. S 

Ferguson, James N 

Dunne, Joseph P 

Ricard, Mdme J 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



Chief Cl'k, Accountant 4 Nov. 
2nd Class Clerk i 1 May 



do 
do 
do 



Junior 2nd Class Clerk 
do do 



do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 



1 July 
1 July 
12 Dec. 
1 Mar. 
1 May 
1 Jan. 
1 Aug. 
1 July 
1 July 



'99 
'91 
•99 
'99 
'99 
'84 
'91 
'87 
'94 
'01 
'01 



$ cts. 
1,850 00 

1,400 00 

1,150 00 

1,150 00 

1,150 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

700 00 

600 00 

600 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



17 Aug. '50 

31 Apr. '67 

4 Nov. '53 

4 Feb. '47 

25 Dec. '66 

21 Sept. '49 
7 July '67 

22 Mar. '65 
12 Feb. '67 



24 June '77 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



30 Apr. '83 
27 May '84 
27 Feb. '77 

1 Apr. '78 
12 Dec. '99 
20 June '83 

31 Mar. '84 
12 Jan. '86 
27 Jan. '98 

1 July '98 
1 July '01 



Ordnance and Admiralty Lands Branch. 



2nd Class Clerk 

Junior 2nd Class Clerk 
do do 



1 July '99 
1 Jan. '87 
1 May '91 



1,150 00 

1,000 00 

897 00 



■23 Nov. 


i 
'69 


24 May 


'65 


25 Dec. 


'61 



1 July '98 
16 Feb. '85 

'78 



School Lands. 



Checkley, Frank Stewart.... 
Lambart, Hon. Octavius H.. 



Isl Class Clerk 

Junior 2nd Class Clerk 



21 July '91 
21 June '84 



1,750 00 7 June '51 

1,000 00 jlO Jan. '55 

i 



13 Apr. '73 
1 Oct. '89 



Timber and Mines Branch. 



Ryley, George Urqubart 
Rowatt, Hugh Howard... 

Campbell, Robt. Hy 

Brough, J. S 

Loyer, Francis 

York, Brown Lee 

Pinard, Arthur A 

Ellis, Miss R. G 

Fisher, Alex. L, B.A 



Chief Clerk 

1st Class Clerk 

do 

2nd Class Clerk ^.. 

do 

Junior 2nd Class Clerk 
do do 

do do 

do do 



1 July 


'98 


1 Jan. 


'00 


1 Jan. 


'00 


1 July 


'89 


1 July 


'01 


1 Dec. 


'86 


9 Feb. 


'92 


26 July 


'92 


1 July 


'01 



2,250 00 
1,450 00 
1,450 00 
1,400 00 
1,100 00 

r,ooo 00 

850 00 
700 00 
600 00 



16 June 


'53 


17 Aug. 


'61 


26 May 


'67 


21 Jan. 


'50 


15 June 


'63 


27 Dec. 


'64 


28 Aug. 


'72 


20 Dec. 


'66 


20 Not. 


'75 



18 Feb. 82 
1 Nov. '87 
4 Oct. '87 

15 Oct. '72 

16 Feb. *82 
20 Apr. '85 
24 Dec. '89 

1 May '88 
1 July '01 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR-INSIDE SERVICE. 

Registration Branch. 



2S 



Name. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Present 
I Salary. 



Henry, Kossi^.th Jarvis Chief Clerk, Registrar} 1 July '97 

j of Correspondence. 
Bell, George 2nd Class Clerk 



Nelson, Frank, B, A | 

Pelletier, Charles Caron j 

Eagleson, James Shore, Jr.. I 

Connolly, Edward ' 

Dunlop, Robert | 

Macnamara, Daniel 

Swinburn, A. R., Jr 

Wood, E.E 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Junior 



1 July '87 
1 July '87 

25 July '94 
1 July '87 

31 May '90 

26 July '92 
20 Jan. '94 

1 July '01 
1 July '01 



$ cts 
2,050 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,300 00 

1,000 00 

850 00 

850 00 

650 00 

600 00 

600 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



5 Apr. '52 

14 Jan '50 
12 June '59 
21 June '62 

1 Aug. '56 

26 June '55 

19 Nov. '55 

1 Nov. "64 

9 June '55 

15 May '79 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



25 June '71 
2 Apr. '83 
4. Nov. '82 

31 Oct. '85 

26 Mar. '86 
12 Mar. '83 
16 Feb. '82 

1 Oct. '86 
1 Oct '73 
1 July '01 



Immigration Branch. 



Fortier, Loftus Morton 

Boardman, William Frears .. 

Badgley, Charles Went- 

worth. 
Ridley, Constance R. Juliet. 

Shaw, Miss Mary 



1st Class Clerk 

2nd Class Clerk 

Junior 2nd Class Clerk 
do do 

do do 



29 June '82 
1 Dec. '86 
1 July '91 
1 May '91 



1 July '93 1,600 00 27 Apr. '58 '74 



1,400 00 1 Mar. '48 }12 Feb. '80 
1,000 CO 24 May '64 10 Nov. '84 



850 00 I 8 Feb. '54 



.50 00 11 Feb. '67 

i 



19 Apr. '83 
1 Nov. '83 



Packer, &c. 


Mason, John 


Packer, &c... 


1 
...'. 1 1 July '91 

1 


732 00 27 Mar. 

1 


36 ' 


'7R 










Messengers. 









Beaudoin, Joseph 

Pegg, Alfred 

Turton, Edwin Ernest. 
Ackland, Henry 



Messenger 21 June '84 



do 
do 
do 



1 Oct. '87 
9 Feb. '92 
1 Apr. '93 



560 00 ,25 Apr. '36 |25 Nov. '80 



560 00 
560 00 
540 00 



3 Apr. '63 
16 July '62 

4 June '71 



22 Sept. '84 

16 June '90 

3 Mar. '92 



24 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DKPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 

Lakd Board; Dominion Lands and Crown Timber Agencies in Manitoba, North-west 
Territories and British Columbia, etc., ktc. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Turriff, J. G 

Ottawa. 
Haanel, Eugene 

Burpe, Thomas Richard 

Stephenson, Edwin Fred'ck 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Stewart, Elihu, D.L.S 

deBalinhard, W. C 

Yorkton. 
Wade, A. R 

Clement, L. J .... 

Brandon. 

Flesher, John 

Minnedosa. Man. 
Fraser, Alexander James 

-McTaggart, John 

Prince Albert, N.W.T. 

Euttan, Robert Anderson 

Edmonton, N.W.T. 
Royal, Jules Augiiste 

Edmonton, N.W.T, 
Herchmer, F. K 

Cottingham, W. H 

McKenzie, John 

New Westminster, B.C.. 

Nash, Edward Augustus 

Kamloops, B.C. 

Chisholm. R. F 

Battleford 
Fisher, Thus. W 



Commissioner i 8 July '98 

Superintend, of Mine^.. 5 June '01 



Chief Clerk Land Com- 
missioner's Office, 
Ottawa. 

Dominion Lands and 
Crown TimberAgent 
for Winnipeg Dis- 
trict, and Inspector 
of Agencies. 

Chief Inspector of Tim- 
ber and Forestry. 

Dominion Land Agent 
for Yorkton District. 

Clerk in D. L. Office, 
Winnipeg. 

Dominion Lands Agt.. 
Brandon. 

Dominion Lands Agt., 
Minnedosa. 

Dominion Lands Agt., 
Lethbridge. 

Dominion Lands and 
Crown Timber Agt., 
Prince Albert Dis- 
trict. 

Dominion Lands Agt 
Edmonton District. 

Clerk 



Dominion Lands Agt., 

Dauphin District. 
Dominion Lands Agt., 

Red Deer District. 
Dominion Lands Agent 

for New Westminster 

District. 
Dominion Lands Agent 

forKamlooi s District 
Dominion Lands Agt., 

Battleford. 
Clerk of D.L.O., Win 

nipeg. 



15 



26 



22 



Sept. '82 
Apr. '82 

Aug. '99 
Sept. '98 
July '92 
Jan. '01 
July '93 
May '84 
May '84 

Jan. '86 
Dec. '85 



20 Jan. '94 
10 July '93 
27 Jan. '90 

31 May '90 
10 May '99 
24 Dec. '83 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 
3,000 00 

3,000 00 

2,200 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



14 Dec. '55 
Not yet reed 
22 Aug. '48 



Date of 

First Ap- 
pointment. 



2,500 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,200 00 
1,200 00 
1,200 00 
1,200 00 

1,400 00 
1,000 00 
1,200 00 
1,200 00 
1,400 00 

1,400 00 

500 00 

1,200 00 



29 Nor. 


'58 


17 Nov. 


'44 


23 Oct. 


'37 


4 Feb. 


'59 


Not yet 


reed 


8 June 


'33 


25 Feb. 


'57 


14 Sept. 


'46 


16 Apr. 


'55 


24 Sept. 


'64 


2 Aug. 


'55 


— Aug. 


'43 


31 Oct. 


'47 


25 June 


'51 


31 July 


'70 


28 July 


'47 



8 July '98 
5 June '01 
5 Aug. '64 

25 Mar. '81 



14 Aug. '97 
1 Feb. '94 
1 Apr. '86 

22 Jan. '01 

13 June '84 
1 M?y '79 
1 May '84 

10 Mar. '84 
17 June '82 

11 June '85 

14 May '83 
1 Jan. '84 

— Apr. '84 
10 May '99 
24 Dec. '83 



District op Keewatin. 



Thomson, Gordon Macdon'ld 



Private Secretary to 
the Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor of Keewatin 



15 Oct. '00 600 00 



28 Aug. '83 



15 Oct. '00 





Surveys. 


• 


Pearce, William 


Chief Inspector of Sur- 
veys. 


5 June '01 


3,000 CO 1 Feb. '48 ' 4 Feb. '82 







CIVIL SERVICE LIST 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 
Registrars for the North-west Territories, Ac. 



25 



Name and P. 0. Address 



Present Rank. 



Newlanis, H. W 

Regina, N.W.T. 



Brewster, Stephen Gladstone 
Prince Albert, N.W.T. 

Winter, W. R 

Calgary, N.W.T. 

Roy, Georges 

Edmonton, N.W.T. 

Prince, Antonio 

Edmonton, N.W.T. 

*Chisholm, R. F 

Battleford, N.W.T. 

Forbes, F. F 

Regina, N.W.T. 



Registrar for Assini- 

! boia District and Ins- 

i pector of Land Titles 

i Offices in the Terri- 

i tories. 

^Registrar for East Sas- 
katchewan District. 

I Registrar for South Al- 

\ berta District. 

I Registrar for North Al- 

I berta District. 

'Deputy Registrar, Ed- 
monton. 

Registrar for West Sas- 
katchewan District... 

Deputy Registrar, Re- 

: gina, N.W.T. 



Date. 



1 Aug. '97 



12 Dec. '90 



5 Feb. '00 
3 Aug. '85 
1 Feb. '99 



10 May 
1 Feb. 



'99 



'99 



Present 
Salary. 


% cts 


2,400 00 


1,200 00 


1,600 00 


1,600 00 


1,200 00 


1,000 00 


1,600 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



19 Mar. '62 i 1 Aug. '97 



11 June '59 
2 July '50 
26 Jan. '48 
22 Oct. 58 
31 July '70 
7 June '54 



12 Dec. 

5 Feb. 

3 Aug. 
21 July 
10 May 

1 Feb. 



'90 
'00 
85 
'98 
'99 
'99 



*Also receives $500 per annum as Dominion Lands Agent at Battleford. 

Immigration. 



Pedley, Francis. 

Smith, J. Obed . 
Doyle, Patrick. 



Quebec, Que 
Stein, Leonce F. Ludovic... 
Quebec, Que 

Lamontagne, Theophile 

Quebec, Que. 

Anderson, William 

Quebec, Que. 

Hoolahan, John 

Nontreal, Que. 
McGovern, James Michael... 



Mitchell, G. H. 



Grieve, Jas. Nicol 

Sault Ste. Marie, 

Mich., U.S.A. 



Supt. of Immigration 
and Inspector of Im- 
migration Offices. 

Commissioner of Immi- 
gration. 

Immigration Agent, 
Quebec, Que. 

Chief Clerk, Immigra- 
tion Office, Quebec. 

Clerk, Immigration 
Office, Quebec. 

Interpreter, Immigra- 
tion Office, Quebec. 

Immigration Agent, 
Montreal, Que. 

Immigration Agent, 
Port Arthur, Ont. 

Clerk, Immigration 
Office, Liverpool, Eng 

Immigration Agent 



1 Sept. '97 I 2,700 00 



18 Jan. '01 

17 May '92 

8 June '77 

5 Mar. '96 
24 Apr. '68 

6 Feb. '93 
5 June '84 
1 Aug. '93 

10 Feb.. '97 



2,200 00 
1,400 00 
1,400 00 
900 00 
800 00 
1,200 00 
1,000 00 
1,200 00 
1,500 00 



25 June '58 ' 1 Sept. '97 



Notrec'dyetjl8 Jan. 
21 May '38 |20 Apr. 

21 Feb. '50 I 1 May 
14 June '43 17 Apr. 

22 June '40 !— Apr. 



24 Dec. '41 
29 Sept. '54 
12 Aug. '60 
17 July '56 



1 May 
23 May 
— Mar. 
10 Feb. 



'01 
'69 
'74 
'79 
•07 
'83 
'82 
'80 
'97 



Yukon Provisional District. 



Ross, Hon. J. H 

Senkler, E. C 

Congdon, F. T 

Girouard, Jos. Ena. 
Bell, Jas. Langlois... 

Lithgow, Jno. T 

Gosselin, F. X 



Commissioner 11 Mar. '01 

Gold Commissioner 26 Oct. '98 



Legal Adviser 

Registrar 

Asst. Gold Com'r 

IComptroUer 

{ Crown Timber Agent. 



13 Mar. '01 
27 July '98 

8 Oct. '99 

14 July '98 
10 Oct. '98 



6,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
4,000 00 
4,000 00 
2,000 00 
2,400 00 



Not rec' 


dyet 


4 Feb. 


65 


16 Nov. 


'58 


17 June 


'55 


4 Jan. 


'57 


25 Jan. 


'56 


16 Jan. 


'61 



26 Oct. '98 
13 Mar. '01 

27 July '98 
8 Oct. '99 

11 Oct '80 

10 Oct. '98 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 190Z 
DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGICAL SURVEY— INSIDE SERVICE. 



Name. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



Robert, Bell, M. D.,D.Sc., 
LL.D.jF.R.S. 

Technical Officers. 

Whiteaves, Joseph Fr'derick. 

LL.D.,F.G.S.,F.R.S.C. 
Hoffmann, George Christian. 

LL.D.,F.I.C.,F.R.S.C. 
Macoun, John, F.L.S.. 

F.R.S.C. 
Ells, Robert Wheelock, 

LL.D., M.A.. FR.S.C. 
Fletcher, Hugh, B.A 



McConnell, Richard George. 

B.A. 
Ingall, Elfric Drew, Assoc. 

R.S.M. 
Lambe, Lawrence Morris, 

F P S 
Chalmers, Robert, F.G.S.A. 

Faribault, Eugene Rodolphe, 

B.Ap.S., F.G.S.A. 
Mclnnes, William, B.A 



Ami, Henry Marc, D.Sc. 

M.A.,F.G,S. 
Barlow, Alfred Ernest 

D.Sc, M.A. 
Macoun, James M 



$ cts. 



Acting Deputy Head 
and Director. 



A sst. Director, Palfeon- 
tologist and Zoologist 

Asst. Director, Chemist 
and Mineralogist. 

Asst. Director, Botanist 
and Naturalist. 

Geologist 



do 

do 

Mining Engineer. 



Artist and Assistant 

Palaeontologist. 
Geologist 



do 
do 



Wait. Frank Goodell, M.A., 

F.C.S. 
Dowling. Donaldson Bogart, 

B.Ap Sc. 
Senecal, Clovis Omer,B.Ap. 

Sc, C.E. 



Brock, Reginald W., M. A.... 

Denis, Theophile 

Marshall. John 

Willimott, Charles William. 
Broadbent, Ralph Lawton... 
Wilson, W^iUiam James 



Richard. Louis Napoleon, 

B.Ap.Sc 
Thorburn, John, M.A.,LL.D. 



Burke, Thomas 

McKinnon, Allan Thos. 



Asst. Palffiontologist... 

Lithologist 

Assistant Naturalist.... 

Asst. Chemist and Min- 
eralogist. 
Geologist 



Geographer and Chief 
Draughtsman. 

Asst. Chemist and Mi- 
neralogist. 

Asst. Geolosfist 



do 



Chief Clerk and Ac 

countant 

2nd Class Clerk 



do 
do 



Junior 2nd Class Clerk 
Librarian 



Res'dt. Housekeeper 

and Hall Porter. 
Junior 2nd Class Clerk. 



5 Mar. '01 

1 July '83 
1 July '83 

27 Dec. '87 
1 July '91 
1 July '91 
1 July '91 
1 July '91 
iJuly '91 
1 July '91 
I July '91 
1 July '91 
1 July '91 
1 July '91 
1 July '98 

27 Jan. '90 
7 Jan. '95 

31 Jan. '95 

25 Oct. '95 
iMay '97 

25 Mar. '01 
1 July '00 
1 July '88 
1 July '90 

25 Mar. '01 
1 July '90 

12 April '82 
1 July '89 
1 July '00 



Date of 
Birth. 



2,450 00 


2,450 00 


2,300 00 


2,200 00 


2,200 00 


2,200 00 


1,950 00 


1,750 00 


1,750 00 


1,750 00 


1,750 00 


1,750 00 


1,700 00 


1,650 00 


1,600 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,400 00 


1,250 00 


1,050 00 


1,850 00 


1,400 00 


1,400 00 


1,100 00 


1,000 00 


800 00 


700 00 


600 00 



I 3 June '41 



26 Dec. '35 

7 June '37 

17 April '32 

26 July '45 

9 Dec '48 

26 Mar. '57 

13 May '58 

27 Aug. '63 
31 Dec. '33 

4 Nov. '60 
21 Jan. '58 

23 Nov. '58 

17 June '61 
7 Nov. '62 

24 Oct. '64 

5 Nov. '58 
30 Jan. '63 

3 July '67 
10 Jan. '74 

25 Feb. '73 

18 Sept. '56 
1 Feb. '52 

14 April' 59 
9 May '51 

12 Dec '59 

10 Oct. '30 

17 Mar. '41 

1 April' 67 



Date of 
First Em- 
ployment. 



1 Mar. 'n 

iJan. '75^ 
iSept. '72- 
1 Jan. '82^ 
IMay '72 
1 Sept. '72- 

12 May '79^ 
1 July '84 
1 Dec. '84: 

20 May '82: 
1 July '81 

12 May '8! 

13 June '82 

1 May '83r 

2 Nov. '83- 
27 Jan. '90 
12 Mar. '84 

5 July '84'. 

25 Nov. '81 
12 July '91 

1 May '9& 

1 Mar. '72 

15 Jan. '72 

26 Jan. '81 
9 June '91 
1 Feb. '83: 

12 April' 82 
— Sept. '81 
22 May '89 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



27 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

THE OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE NORTH-WEST MOUNTED 
POLICE-INSIDE SERVICE. 



Name. 



White, Frederick 

Fortescue, Laurence 

Fisher, Alexander 

duPlessis, Leonidas J. T. R. 
Gallwey, Reginald Munro M. 
Bishop, Richard Samuel 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Comptroller and De-' 1 July '83 

puty Head. i 

Chief Clerk |17 May '92 



1st Class Clerk.. 
2nd Class Clerk. 

de 

do 



17 May '92 
8 Jan. '98 

19 Aug. '99 
1 Ju'y '01 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 
3,200 00 

2,150 00 

1,750 00 

1,250 00 

1,150 00 

1,100 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



16 Feb. '47 3 Mar. '69 



17 Aug. '45 
11 Oct. '30 
1 Sept. '63 
16 Dec. '63 
28 Seet. '62 



1 June '75 

1 July '75 

— Dec. '79 

20 June '81 

9 May '83 



NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE FORCE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Perry, Aylesworth Bowen, 

Mclllree, John Henry 

Deane, Richard Burton 



Steele, Samuel Benfield,C.B. 

M.V.O. 
Griesbach. Arthur Henry.... 



Moffatt, George Buchanan... 

Howe, Joseph 

Constantine, Charles 

Wood, Zachary Taylor 

Sanders, Gilbert Edward 



Primrose, Philip Carteret 

Hill. 
Morris, William S. M 



Snyder; Arthur Edward 

Cuthbert, Albert Edw. Ross 

McGibbon, John Alexander. 

Wilson, James Osgood 

Moodie, John Douglas , 

Begin, Joseph Victor , 

Starnes, Cortlandt 

Casey, Henry Samuel.. 

Baker, Montague 

Routledge, Walton H 

Davidson, Hugh Jas. Alexr.. 

Macdonell, Archibald Came 
ron. D.S.O. 



Commissioner 

Asst. Commissioner. 
Superintendent 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Inspector 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



1 Aug. 
1 Nov. 
1 Apr. 
1 Aug. 
15 Sept. 
1 Nov. 
4 May 
1 Sept. 
1 July 
1 July 

14 Oct. 
1 July 
1 July 
1 Aug. 

15 Sept. 
15 Sept. 
15 Sept. 
22 Oct. 

1 Mar. 
20 Oct. 

1 Jan. 

1 May 

1 Feb. 
28 Sept. 



'00 
'92 
'84 
'85 
'85 
'90 
'93 
'97 
'98 
'99 
'99 
'01 
'01 
'85 
'85 
'85 
'85 
'85 



'87 
'87 
'89 
'89 



2,600 00 
1,600 00 
1,400 00 
1,400 00 
1.400 00 
1,400 00 
1,400 00 
1,400 00 
1,400 GO 
1,400 00 
1,400 00 
1,400 00 
1,400 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
],000 00 



21 Aug. '60 
28 Feb. '49 

30 Apr. '48 
5 Jan. '49 

22 Oct. '39 
13 Dec. '54 

5 Sept. '55 
13 Nov. '49 
27 x\ov. '60 
25 Dec. '63 

23 Oct. '64 

6 Sept. '47 

24 Mar. '61 
1 Aug. '60 
1 Feb. '57 

17 Aug. '58 
21 Nov. '49 

15 Feb. '56 

31 Jan. '64 
23 July '48 

5 Jan. '59 

16 Jan. '63 

6 Jan. '57 
6 Oct. '54 



42 Jan. '82 

14 Nov. '70 
1 July '83 

31 Aug. '78 
1 June '75 
1 Sept. '83 
1 July '83 

20 Oct. '86 
1 Aug. '85 
1 Sept. '84 
1 Aug. '85 
1 May '84 
1 Aug. '85 
1 Aug. '85 

15 Sept. '85 
15 Sept. '85 
15 Sept. '85 
22 Oct. '85 

1 Mar. '86 
20 Oct. '86 
1 Jan. '87 
1 May '87 
1 Feb. '89 
28 Sept.' 9 



SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE FORCE... OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Name. 



Present Rank. 



Scarth, William Hamilton. ..Inspector. 
Howard, Donald Macdoneld. 
Strickland, D'Arcy Edward 

Belcher, Robert, C.M.G 

Irwin, William H 

Jarvis, ArthurMurray , C . M .G [ 

Brown, Edward Gilpin 

Williams, W. Martin de Ray 
Cartwright, Francis Lennox 
Demers, Francois Joseph A.. 

Cosby, Fred Lome 

Horrigan, Fitzpatrick Jos... 



McDonell, Albert Edward 

Crosby. 
West, Christopher Harfield.. 



Crosthwait, Samuel 

McGinnis, Thomas 

Walke, William Mackenzie.. 
Pelletier, Ephrem Albert.... 

Worsley, George Stanley 

Paradis, Edouard Charles ... 

Heffernan, John Herbert 

Wickham, William Charles. 

Taylor, John 

Pare, Louis Alphonse, M.D. 
Fraser, Samuel Martin, M.D. 
Haultain, Chas. Selby, M D. 
Bell, George Pearson, M.D.. 

Thompson, W. E., M.D 

*Madore, Godefroy, M.D 

Burnett, John, V.S 



Wroughton, Theodore Am- 
brose, V.S. 



do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Assistant Surgeon. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



Inspector and Veterin- 
ary Surgeon, 
do do 







$ cts. 


15 Oct. 


89 


1,000 00 


1 Not. 


'90 


1,000 00 


15 Nov. 


'91 


1,000 00 


1 Feb. 


93 


1,000 00 


4 May 


'93 


1,000 00 


16 May 


'93 


1,000 00 


8 Feb. 


'94 


1,000 00 


8 Feb. 


'94 


1,000 00 


15 Feb. 


•97 


1,000 00 


3 June 


'98 


1,000 00 


U Oct. 


'99 


1,000 00 


4 Nov. 


'99 


1,000 00 


1 Aug. 


'00 


1,000 00 


1 Aug. 


'00 


1,000 00 


1 Aug. 


'00 


1,000 00 


1 Sept. 


'00 


1,000 00 


1 Oct. 


'00 


1,000 00 


1 Jan. 


'01 


1,000 00 


1 April 


'01 


1,000 00 


1 May 


'01 


1,000 00 


15 May 


'01 


1,000 00 


1 June 


'01 


1,000 00 


1 July 


'01 


1,000 00 


1 July 


'87 


1,000 00 


1 May 


'89 


1,000 00 


1 July 


'89 


1,000 00 


8 Feb. 


'94 


1,200 00 


12 July 


'98 


1,400 00 


15 Aug 


'98 


1,000 00 


1 July 


'90 


1,000 00 


1 Mar. 


'98 


1,000 00 



Date of 
Birih. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



18 June '70 
6 Feb. '61 

26 Nov. '68 
23 Apr. '49 
29 Dec. '46 

6 Apr. '62 

19 Oct. '54 
8 Sep. '54 

27 Nov. '74 
6 Nov. '65 
8 Oct. '74 

13 Oct. '61 



29 Sept. '60 



27 Oct. '58 



21 Jan. '80 
20 June '66 
23 Feb. '79 
26 Sept. '67 



15 Feb. '48 
23 Nov. '67 

16 Aug. '63 
5 Feb. '48 
9 May '59 

U Apr. '45 
— Dec. '59 
11 Nov. '62 



15 Oct. '89 
1 Nov. '90 

15 Nov. '91 
1 Feb. '93 
4 May '93 

16 May '93 
8 Feb. '94 
8 Feb. '94 

15 Feb. '97 

3 June '98 

14 Oct. '99 

4 Nov. '99 
1 Aug. '00 
1 Aug. '00 
1 Aug. '00 
1 Sept. '00 
1 Oct. '00 
1 Jan. '01 
1 Apr. '01 

.1 May '01 

15 May '01 
1 June '01 
1 July '01 
1 July '87 
1 May '89 
1 July '89 
8 Feb. '94 

12 July '98 

15 Aug. '98 

1 July '87 

1 Jan. '88 



* Temporarily for service in the Yukon . 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



2Sf 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR GENERAL— INSIDE SERVICE. 



Name. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment 
permanently 



McDougall, John Lome, 
C.M.G.. M.A. 

Sutherland, Edward Daven- 
port 

Gorman, John 



Hayter, Frederick, BA 

Hudson, Arthur Bartlett, 

B.A. 
Reid, John Warren, B.A 



Kearns, William. 



Stevenson, James Shannon.. 

Bissonnette, Louis Adolphe, 

B.A., B.C.L. 
Hayes, Edwin Clay 



Gross, Harrison, B.A 

Stockton, Edmund Ebenezer 
Gibson, John Hugh Peden.. 
Sherwood, iBeverly Wilmot. 
Baldwin, Harma Adelaide... 

Belford, Ethel 

Tucker, Walter , 

Wagner, David John 

O'Connell, Ellen Mary 

Allen, Singleton Somerville 

Folkins, Harry Allison , 

Steeves, Charles Watson 

Johnston, Edward S ■ 

Connolly, Patrick 

Brown, Albert H., B.A 

Bill, Austin F., B,A 

Godard, Henry Philip 

Mclsaac, Ronald J., B.A..... 



Auditor General.... 
Chief Clerk 

do 

do 

1st Class Clerk 

do 

do 

do 

2nd Class Clerk.... 

do 

do 

do 

Jr 2nd Class Clerk. 

do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Aug '78 
Feb. '99 
July '90 
July '90 
Sept. '96 
Sept. '96 
Sept '96 
July '01 
Feb. '90 
July '92 
Nov. '96 
July '01 
June '79 
Nov. '83 
July '85 
July '87 
July '90 
July '92 
Apr. '92 
Nov. '92 
Jan. '95 
June '95 
July '95 
July '00 
July '00 
July '00 
July '01 
July '01 



$ cts. 
4,000 00 

2,250 00 

2,200 »0 

2,200 00 

1,600 00 

1,600 00 

1,600 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,200 00 

1,100 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

900 00 

850 00 

800 00 

750 00 

750 00 

650 00 

650 00 

650 00 

650 00 

650 00 

600 00 

600 00 



6 Nov. '38 
19 Nov. '63 

7 June '48 

30 June '56 
15 Apr. '59 
28 Jan. '60 
24 Aug. '65 
15 Nov. '63 
15 Nov. '54 

7 Apr. '58 

31 Oct. '63 
5 Dec. '70 

23 Sept. '34 

13 June '59 

I 

' 7 Aug. '51 

28 May '66 

23 Mar. '66 

3 Nov. '61 

10 Mar. '65 

1 12 Mar. '62 

1 

j27 Dec. '69 

23 Mar. '70 
13 June '67 
19 Oct. '72 

5 Dec. '73 

19 Apr. '77 

2 Aug. '68 

24 June '75 



1 Aug. '78 

I Sept. '75 
1 Jan. '80 
1 Jan. '80 

II Feb. '84 
1 July '85 
4 Oct. '83 

13 Oct. '84 
25 Jan. '83 
1 Mar. '84 
9 Oct. '91 
1 Jan '91 
1 June '79 
1 Nov. '83 
1 July '85 
1 July '87 
15 July '90 
1 July '92 
1 Apr. '92 
1 Nov. '92 
7 Jan. '95 
22 June '95 
12 July '95 
1 Jan. '90 
1 July '00 
9 July '00 
1 July '01 
1 July '01 



30 



SECRETARY OF STATE. 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE— INSIDE SERVICE. 



Name. 



Courtney, John Mortimer, 

C.M.G. 
Fitzgerald, William, M.A.... 



Toller, Frederick 

Dickieson, Matthew George. 

Treadwell, Clarence Wm., 

B.A. 
Eraser. John 



Ross, Wm. Donald 

Lowe, George, jr 

Gough, Charles Archer. 
McNicol, John 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Deputy Minister and 
Sec. of Treasury Boa' d 

Asst. Deputy Minister 
and Superintendent 
of Insurance. 

Chief Clerk and Comp- 
troller of Dominion 
Currency. 

Chief Clerk and Dom- 
inion Book-keeper. 

Chief Clerk and Secre- 
tary. 

Chief Clerk and Assist- 
ant Accountant. 

Chief Clerk 



Garland, Nicholas Surrey, 

F.S.S., F.S.A. 
Jenkins, Samuel Judson, 

B.A. 
Boville, Thomas Cooper,B.A 

Blair, William Livingston... 

Hayes, William Hazen 



Neeve, John Bonnor Har- 
rington 
Turgeon, Charles Edward.., 

Street, Charles Frederick 

M.A. 
Clayton, James Alfred 



Wiggins, Ezekiel Stone, 

M.A., M.D, LL.D. 
Capbert, Emile 



Black, Ernest Augustus 

CoflBn, Frederick Ashley.. .. 

Scott, Charles Stenson 

Brittain, Edwin Lester 

Foster, Albert Brunswick .. 
Saunders, John Cramp 



1st Class Clerk 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do Account 

ant of Contingencies 

2nd Class Clerk 



Burns, Clement B., B.A., 

LL.B. 
Morton, J. R., B.A 



Tasker, Charles James. 

Gilmour, Thomas 

Grierson, Frank 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



and 



Private Secretary. 
2nd Class Clerk 



Junior 2nd Class Clerk 
do do 

do do 



Present 
Salary. 



1 Aug. '78 
1 Dec. '85 

1 July '81 

1 July '86 

1 July '91 

1 Oct. '98 

1 July '01 

1 Jan. '85 

1 Apr. '85 

1 July '86 

1 July '91 

1 July '95 

1 Oct. '98 

1 July '61 

1 July '01 

29 Mar. '65 

1 Feb. '76 

1 July '73 

1 Oct. '76 

5 Dec. '79 

1 July '86 

1 July '86 

1 Jan. '89 

4 June '89 

1 July '91 

1 July '91 

1 Jnly '04 

31 Mar. '99 

1 May '01 

1 Feb. '73 

1 Feb. '82 

1 July '0 1 



$ cts. 
4,200 00 

4,000 00 

2,600 00 

2,400 00 

2,400 GO 

2,200 00 

2,400 00 

1,800 00 

1,800 00 

1,800 00 

1,800 00 

1,600 00 

1,500 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1, 100 00 

1,100 00 

400 00 

1,100 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

800 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



22 July '38 
29 July '45 

21 June '41 

7 Feb. '49 
5 July '54 

13 Dec. '52 
20 June '69 
25 Dec. '41 

16 Aug. '52 
28 Aug. '40 

8 June '45 

10 Nov. '49 

14 Mar. '60 
28 Dec. '52 

17 July '59 
4 Jan. '35 

22 Mar. '46 
7 Sept. '34 

3 Sept. '42 

4 Dec. '39 
7 Mar. '40 

17 June '60 

12 Feb. '58 
22 Dec. '42 

1 Feb. '66 

11 Oct. '58 
19 July '62 
26 Sept. '68 

7 Aug. '75 

13 Nov. '33 
11 Mar. '37 

4 Sept. '65 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



2 June '69 
1 Dec. '85 

1 Oct. '71 

1 Jan. '74 
1 Nov. '82 

21 May '75 
1 July '01 
5 Feb. '75 

3 Nov. '69 
1 Sept. '75 

22 June '70 
21 Jan. '86 
26 Jan. '83 
15 Nov. '71 
15 Oct. '84 
29 Mar. '65 

1 July '72 
1 July ' 73 

26 Jan. '71 
12 Feb. '79 
12 Feb. '80 
29 May '79 

27 Sept. '75 
7 July '67 
1 May '84 
1 Oct. '84 

23 Mar. '82 
31 Mar. '99 

1 July '98 
19 Feb. '72 
18 Sept. '81 

I July '01 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST. 



31 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE-INSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P. 0. Address. : Present Rank. 


Date. 


Present 
Salary. 


1 pointment. 

1 


1 

Oqtrom William Henrv .... Messenerer 


1 July '78 
1 Apr. '95 


$ cts. 
560 00 

480 00 


18 Apr. '42 
13 Dec. '70 


1 July '78 
1 Apr. '95 


i^Q+Tom Wm N ... do 







DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Blackadar, Alfred Kimball, 
M.A., F.I.A. Ottawa. 

O'Reilly, Anthony 

Ottawa. 
Orant, M. D 



Evans, Frederick Augustus. 
Oreighton, D 



Ridout, John Grant 

Toronto. 

Fleming, C. E 

Toronto. 

Kirkpatrick, Gordon S 

Toronto. 

Stewart, Matthew 

Toronto. 

Wallace, John Roberts 

Halifax. 

*Parker, Lewis 

Halifax. 

Johnston, Arthur Clement.. 

Halifax. 

Balcom, John Horton 

Halifax. 

Ring, M. J 

...Halifax 

McLeod, Howard D 

St. John, N.B. 

Sancton, Frederick G 

Saint John, N.B. 

Cowan, R S 

Saint John, N.B. 

Rourke, J. E 

Saint John, N.B. 

Ewing, R 

Saint John, N.B 

Lawson, Thomas Stanford.. 

Saint John, N.B. 

Drummond, Henry Mowat... 

Winnipeg. 

McMicken, Albert Clifton ... 

Winnipeg. 

Armetrong, Edward Wm. H 

Winnipeg. 

MacLaughlin, Joseph Hugh. 

Victoria. 



Chief Clerk, Insurance 

Branch. 
2nd Class Clerk 



Junior 2nd Class Clerk 

do do .. 

Asst. Receiver General, 

Toronto. 
Accountant 



Clerk 

do 

Messenger & Caretaker 

Asst. Receiver General, 

Halifax. 
Acct. in A.R.G. Office. 

Acct. in Savings Bank. 

Teller 

Clerk 



As3t. Receiver General, 

St. John. 
Teller, Savings Bauk... 



Clerk , 

do 

do 

Janitor. Dom. Buildings 

Asst. ReceiverGeneral, 

Winnipeg. 
Clerk 



Teller, 



Asst.Receiver General, 
Victoria. 



1 July '93 

1 July '98 

1 July 'GO 

1 July '87 

10 May '95 

22 July '77 

1 Nov. '90 

7 Dec. '95 

25 Jan. '86 

30 Nov. '63 

28 Mar. '72 
1 July '74 

15 June '77 

29 Nov. '93 
1 Feb. '93 

1 July '76 

2 Oct. '93 
20 Jan. '94 

2 Mar. '95 
28 May '79 

20 May '79 

21 May '79 
23 May '82 

1 Jan. '90 



2,300 00 

1,250 00 

850 00 

650 00 

3,000 00 

1,500 00 

600 00 

900 00 

600 00 

2,200 00 

1,400 00 

1,350 00 

1,200 00 

450 00 

2,200 00 

1,400 00 

800 00 

700 00 

600 00 

550 00 

2,250 00 

1,500 00 

1,300 00 

2,000 00 



24 Oct. '52 
17 Aug. '66 
31 Oct. '73 
16 Nov. '63 

'43 

20 Apr. '45 

28 Jan. '46 
12 Apr. '72 

5 Oct. '56 

15 Feb. '23 

16 Oct. '44 
15 Dec. '53 

'41 

30 Oct. '72 

29 July '38 

6 July '42 
28 July '38 

4 Sept. '73 
28 Mar. '49 

4 Dec. '38 
19 Aug. '48 
10 Sept. '57 

1 May '60 
15 Apr. '39 



1 Mar. 77 
1 Oct. '85 
4 Jan. '00 
1 May '87 

10 May '95 
8 July '72 
1 Nov. '90 
7 Dec. '95 

11 Mar. '78 
—Sept. '42 

5 Nov. 69 
—Nov. '71 
15 June '77 
29 Nov. '93 

1 June '92 

1 July '76 

2 Oct. '93 

20 Jan. '94 
2 Mar. '95 

28 May '79 
1 May '72 

21 May '79 
23 May '82 

1 July '84 



SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



McConnan, D. B 

Victoria. 
Winsby, Walter 

Pope, Percy 

Charlottetown. 
Leitch, "Wallace 

Charlottetown. 
Loughran, Francis 

Charlottetown. 



1 % cts. j ! 

Clerk |lO June '93 | 1,100 00 25 May '69 j 1 May '91 

do ^30 Dec. '98 700 00 30 Dec. '98 

1 July '83 1,950 00 ! 8 May '56 1 July '83 

I 

9 Jan. '74 j 1,250 00 {20 Dec. '54 9 Jan. '74 

do 01 July '82 



Asst. Receiver General, 

Charlottetown. 
Clerk 



900 00 j 7 Nov. '52 1 July '82 

I 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



sa 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND COMMERCE— INSIDE SERVICE. 



Name. 



Parmelee, William Grannis.. 
Nutting, James Pessley 

O'Hara, F. C.T j 

Warne, Wm. A 

Robertson, Alice Maude 

Shaw, Margaret 

Kennedy, Agnes C 

Robertson, Alexander ... 



Present Rank. 



Deputy Minister. 
Chief Clerk 



1st Class Clerk and "I 
Private Secretary., j 

Junior 2nd Class Clerk 
do do 

do do 

do do 

Messenger 



Date. 


Present 
Salary. 




% cts. 


1 Jan. '93 


3,200 00 


1 July '99 


1,900 00 


1 July'99 1 


1,400 001 
400 00 } 


1 July '01 


800 00 


1 Aug. '94 


600 00 


7 Dec. '95 


750 00 


1 July '01 


700 00 


22 Dec. '94 


560 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



27 Aug. '33 
1 Aug. '56 



19 Jan. '76 
1 Mar. '76 



T Nov. '70 |25 Apr. '97 

1 July '66 
13 Jan. '69 
31 Dec. '64 
30 Mar. '70 



22 July '55 



1 July '01 
1 Aug. '94 
7 Dec. '95 
1 July '01 
—Dec. '77 



DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND COMMERCE— OUTSIDE SERVICE, 



Parmelee, William Grannis. 1 Chief Comptroller of20Aug. '85 

Chinese Immigration 

Milne, Alex. R Comptroller do 1 Jan. '90 

Victoria, B.C. 

Bowell, John M Comptroller do 1 July '90 

Vancouver, B.C. 



1,000 00 
400 00 
400 00 



27 Aug. 


'33 


20 


Dec. 


'42 


1 


Oct. 


'56 



20 Aug, '85 
1 Jan. '90 
1 July '90 



30-3 



<84 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF INLAND REVENUE— INSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Gerald, William John. 
Himsworth, William . . 



Campeau, Fabien Rene 

Edouard. 
Valin, Joseph Elzear 



Carter, William 

Shaw, James Fitzwilliam.... 

Doyon, Joseph Alfred 

Westman, Thos 

Quain, Redmond 

Fowler, George 

Newby, Frank 

Byrnes, John 

Burns, John 

Dunne, John Patrick 

Hughes, Peter Ambrose 

Hudon, Marie Leo Edmoud... 

McCuUough, Anthony 

Halliday, Wm. Arthur 

Bouchette, Robeit Errol... ] 

Roy, Leonidas Guisolphe 

Chevrier, Miss Blanche 

Potvin, Napoleon 

Yetta, Robt. Peter 



Present Rank. 



Deputy Minister of 

Inland Revenue. 
Chief Clerk, Secretary. 

Chief Clerk, and Chief 

Accountant. 
1st Class Clerk 



Date. 



do 



Asst.Sec, 



do and Chief 
Statistical Clerk. 
Ist Class Clerk 



do 
do 
do 
2nd Class Clerk, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



2nd Class Clerk and 
Private Scretary. 

Junior 2nd Class Clerk 

do do 

Messenger. 



do 



Present 
Salary. 



June '01 
July '84 
July '95 
July '83 
July '88 
July '95 
Apr. '97 
July '99 
Apr. '01 
July '01 
July '86 I 
July '87 
Aug. '91 
Oct. '91 
Dec. '97 
Feb. "gs 
Apr.' 01 
Apr. '01 

Feb. '01 

Nov. '98 

June '94 
Mar. '01 
Dec. '95 
July '98 



$ cts 
3,200 00 

2,400 00 

2,400 00 

1,800 00 

1,800 00 

1,650 00 

1,550 00 

1,500 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,100 00 

1,150 00 

1,100 00 

1,100 00 

1,100 00 
600 00 

850 00 

600 00 

550 00 

450 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



27 July '50 
23 Dec. '47 

8 July '44 
17 Oct. '49 

4 Nov. '33 
14 May '56 

23 Mar. '51 
25 Jan. '63 
27 Mar. '59 
10 May '49 

1 Apr. '51 
29 May '59 
10 June '32 
27 May '61 

24 Feb. '68 
13 Mar. '67 
22 Jan. '71 
27 Mar. '67 

[2 June' 63 

21 Mar. '72 

29 Sept. '75 

8 Dec. '68 

13 Sept. ' 70 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



4 Apr. '67 
1 Mar. '68 

6 Nov. '71 
12 June '74 

1 July '73 
1 Jan. '72 

7 Feb. '76 
3 May '84 
1 May '80 
9 June '69 

— Mar. '72 
16 Jan. '83 

7 Feb. '73 
14 Jan. '83 

1 July '95 
11 Feb. '98 

9 Aug.'87 
20 Mar. '94 

1 Nov. '98 

1 May '91 
27 Jan. '96 
31 Dec. '95 

1 July '95 



DEPARTMENT OF INLAND REVENUE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Adams, John Stavrick 

Toronto, Ont. 

Alexander, Thomas 

London, Ont. 

Allen, George Alpheus 

Windsor, Ont. 

Alteman, Peter J 

Guelph. 

Amor, William 

Hamilton. 

Andrews, Alfred Augustus. 

Montreal. 

Armstrong, Walter 

Ottawa. 



3rd Class Exciseman... 

Collector Inland Rev- 
enue. 
1st Class Clerk 



2nd Class Exciseman... 

2nd do 

2nd do 

Siipt. Methylat. Spirits 
Warehouse 



1 May 


'76 


1 July 


'83 


1 Sept. 


'91 


1 July 


'01 


1 Jan. 


^87 


3 Aug. 


'98 


9 Oct. 


'£1 



750 00 


1,980 00 


1,000 00 


750 00 


850 00 


825 00 


1,800 CO 



4 Apr. 


'30 


13 Oct. 


'45 


15 Aug. 


'67 


29 Aug. 


'54 


6 July 


'41 


11 July 


'68 


9 Nov. 


'55 



1 May '76 

1 Dec. '70 

22 Mar. '88 

26 Apr. '97 

1 Oct. '83 

3 Feb. '98 

10 June "87 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



85 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF INLAND REVENUE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Aubin, Aime J 

Montreal j 

Baby, Wolstan Alex. Dixie.. 
Hamilton, Ont. 

Baker, Joseph Stevens 

Montreal. 

Barber, John Sortiss... - 

Toronto. 

Barnes, Geo 

Rat Portage, Ont. 

Barrett, John Kelley 

Winnipeg. 

Basinet, Louis 

Joliette. 

Bayard, Gilbert Alphonse... 

Windsor, Ont. 

Beauchamp, Jos. Pantaleon 

Montreal. 

Beaulieu, Jean-Baptiste 

Quebec. 

Behan, John Joseph J 

Kingston, j 

Belair, Plessis dit, Arthur... 
Montreal. 

Bell, James Edward 

Brantford. 

Bel], John Hector 

Oharlottetown, P.E.I. 

Belleperche, Adolphe Jas . E . 

Windsor. 

BelleRives, George 

Quebec. 

Belyea, Theodore Harding . 

St. John, N.B. 

Bernier, Jean Augure 

St. John, N.B. 

Berry, H. L 

Brantford. 

Bernard, N. J. D 

Montreal. 

Bennett, James 

Ottawa. 

Benoit, Louis Victor j 

St. Hyacinthe, P.Q. 1 

Bickle, John Watkins 

Peterborough. 

Bish, Philip 

Guelph, Ont. 

Bishop, James Bartindale 

Hamilton. 

Blackman, Chas 

Hamilton. 

Blair, Alexander 

Quebec. 

Blair, James Burns 

Toronto. 

Blethen. Charles William.... 

Halifax, N.S. 

Blyth, Alexander 

Owen Sound. 

Boomer, Joseph Boyle 

Toronto. 

30— 3i 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Gas Inspector 

Insp. of Electric Light. 
Consulting Gas Eng'r. 
Special ClassExcisem'n 

Asst. Inspect. W. & M, 

2nd Class Exciseman... 

Deputy Collect. Inland 

Revenue (Class B), 
District Inspector 



Acting Collect. Inland 

Revenue (Class B). 
1st Class Exciseman... 

Distr. Inspector Inland 

Revenue. 
3rd Class Exciseman.., 

Insp. of Gas, Asst. Insp. 

otElectr. Light & D. 

W. & M. 
3rd Class Exciseman... 



1st 



do 



Inspector of Gas and 

Electric Light. 
2nd Class Exciseman... 

Clerk, Cullers' Office... 

Collector Inland Rev... 

Asst. Inspector W. &M. 

2nd Class Exciseman... 

Deputy Collect. Inland 

Revenue (Class B). 
Deputy Collect Inland 

Revenue (ClassB). 
Collector Inland Rev... 
Inspector of Gas and 

Gas Meters. 
Deputy Collect. Inland 

Revenue. 
1st Class Exciseman.... 

3rd do 

Messenger, Inland Rev. 

Deputy Collect. Inland 

Revenue (ClassB). 
Accountant 



1st Class Exciseman.... 
2nd Class Exciseman.... 



Accountant. 



Present 
Salary. 







5 May' 

27 May ' 

IJune' 

1 Jan. 


93") 
95 \ 
89 J 
'88 


1 Dec. 


'87 


20 Oct. 


'80 


12 Nov. 


'97 


1 May 


'85 


2 Nov. 


'96 


1 July 


'98 


4 Nov. 


'97 


8 Sept. 


'98 


24 Dec. 

2 May 


'98 
'98 


1 July 


'97 


1 July 


'97 


17 June 


'01 


1 July 


'01 


25 Oct. 


'92 


1 July 


'01 


19 Jan. 


'01 


1 July 


'01 


25 May 


'01 


8 Mar. 


'00 


1 Apr. 
8 Jan. 


'01 
'01 


1 Nov. 
1 June 
1 Jan. 


'87 
'89 
'88 


9 Nov. 


'98 


1 Dec. 


'94 


25 Apr. 


'98 


1 Dec. 


'88 


1 July 


'94 


1 July 


'01 


1 July 


'00 



% cts, 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 
700 00 
850 00 
600 00 

2,500 00 
600 00 
977 50 

2,200 00 

682 50 

400 00 ) 
600 00 \ 

750 00 

1,000 00 

300 00 

750 00 

750 00 

1,400 00 

600 00 

750 00 

500 00 

900 00 

1,000 00 
75 00 

700 00 

100 00 

1,000 00 

660 00 

530 00 

200 00 

1,400 00 

1,000 00 

750 00 

1,400 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



30 Apr. '42 

13 Apr. '57 
19 July '37 
25 Nov. '52 
18 Sept. '54 

6 June '50 

29 Nov. '46 

8 June '41 

4 Aug. '54 

31 Oct. '67 

12 Oct. '58 
4 Dec. '56 

31 Jan. '67 
6 Mar. '57 

14 Nov. '65 

13 Sept. '59 
1 July '57 

29 Sept., 50 

11 Jan. '66 

30 Jan. '49 
— Apr. '55 

[ 19July'62 

|20Jan.'49 

12 Sept. '38 

22 Aug 40 

23 May '50 

31 July '43 

24 July '48 
22 Oct. '45 
18 Mar. '72 
12 Nov. '50 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



— June '75 
30 Nov. '76 

1 Dec. '87 
20 June '79 
12 Nov. '98 

5 Sept. '73 

2 Nov. '96 
12 Dec. '89 

1 June '75 
9 Mar. '98 

24 Dec. '98 
1 Sept. '91 
1 Feb. '91 

17 June '01 
20 Feb. '99 

25 Oct. '92 
20 Nov. '86 
20 July '00 

5 Jan. '00 
25 May '01 

8 Mar. '00 

8 Jan. '01 

1 Nov. '87 

10 Oct. '82 

19 July '93 
12 July '93 
25 Apr. '98 

6 Oct. '73 

11 Oct. '86 
4 Mar. '96 
6 Aug. '79 



as 



SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF INLAND REVENUE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



3rd Class Exciseman... 
3rd do 



1 July 
1 Sept. 



Bourassa, Joseph 

Quebec. 

Bourget, Onesime 

Quebec. I 

Bousquet, J. iSrd do ... 12 July 

St Hyacinthe.j 

Boudet, Etienne lAsst. Inspector W.& M. 1 Feb. 

Montreal, i 
Bouteiller, George Antoine.. Special Class Excise- 1 Jan. 
VNindsor. } man. j 

Bowen, Frederick C 3rd Class Exciseman... 1 July 

Sherbrooke.j Asst. In. Gas& El. Lt. J 4 July 

Bowman, Allan W Ist Class Exciseman... 1 July 

Guelph, Ont.i 
Boyd, Jas. Fred. Sheppard... 2nd do ... 6 June 

Toronto.' 

Boyd, Samuel Irwin jDep. Collector Inland! 3 Sept. 

Toronto. Revenue (Class B). ! 

Boyle, Patrick 1st Class Exciseman ...I 1 July 

Lonuon.l " 1 

Brabant, Jean-Bte. Gilbert:3rd do ...! 1 Oct. 

Nicephore. Montreal j j 

Brain, Alphonsis Frederick..'lst do ... 1 July 

Guelph, Out. I 

Breen, John [Asst. Inspector W.A M. 8 Jan. 

Pembroke. 

2nd Class Exciseman... 1 July 



Brennan, David Joseph 

Toronto, Ont 

Brennan, John Special Class Excise- 
Windsor, Ont. man. 

Broadfoot, Samuel f Accountant 

Guelph. \ Gas Inspector 

Broadfoot, S Gas Inspector 



Berli 



3 June 

1 June 

12 Sept. 
1 Sept. 



Bryu^re, H. P 



Belleville, Ont. 



Browne, George Wheatland 2nd Class Exciseman...' 1 July '73 

Kingston, Out.' 
Brown, William Jame8..^.....:Prob'y 3rd Class Ex- 25 Mar. '01 

'99 

'91 

'01 



Montreal. 



ciseman. 
Dep. Collector Inland 19 June 
Revenue (Class B). j 

Burke, Timothy Ilnsp , Inland RevenuelT Apr. 

St. John, N.B.; tor N.B. aud N.S. i 

Burns, Robert Joseph jProb'y 3rd Class Ex-| 2 Jan. 

Toronto, Ont. I ciseman. j 

Cahill, John William 3rd Class Exciseman... 10 Nov. 

Windsor, Ont.! ! 

Cahill, Joseph Hi ckey ^^J- Collector Inland 1 Apr. 

Quebec! Revenue (Class A). \ 
Cameron, Donald McPher-!Special Class Excise-j 1 Nov. 
son. Hamilton, Ont.i man. | 

Cargill, William jDep. Collector Inlandj 2 Apr. 

Vancouver, B.C.! Revenue (Class B). , 



Carroll, Daniel 
Casey, John 



Halifax, 



l3t Class Exciseman 
Preventive Officer. 



Ottawa. 

Caven, Alexander Colector Inland Reve- 

Stratford.i nue. 

Caven, William |2nd Deputy Collector 

of Inland Revenue. 
Asst Inspector W. AM. 



Montreal. 

Chabot, Francjois-Xavier 

Quebec. 

Chalut, Joseph Olier 

Montreal 

Chartier, Etienne 

Sherbrooke. 



Inspector W. & M 

Deputy Collector In- 
land Rev. (Clasi A), 



1 Jan. 

1 Dec. 

1 Jan. 
25 Mar. 

7 June 
20 Aug. 

1 July 



'82 
'80 
'98 
'87 
'98 
'73 
'01 
'80 
'81 
'97 



Present 
Salary. 



% cts. 
750 00 

750 00 

630 00 

800 00 

1,600 00 

I 735 00 
1,000 00 

750 00 

1,200 00 

1,000 00 

750 00 

935 00 

600 00 

1,000 00 

1,200 00 

1,050 00 > 

200 00 I 

100 00 

850 00 

500 00 

600 00 

2,500 00 

500 00 

750 00 

1,430 00 

1,500 00 

730 00 

1,000 00 

750 00 

1,600 00 

1,500 00 

600 00 

1,600 00 

1,200 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



7 June '70 
21 Feb. '55 

10 Feb. '68 

4 June '49 
14 Oct. '59 

8 July '76 

11 Mar. '41 

14 Apr. '78 
31 Jan. '39 
16 Nov. '41 
16 Apr. '55 
20 Apr. '70 

12 July '40 
20 June '72 

24 June '47 

20 Dec. '53 

20 Dec. '53 

21 Jan. '33 
1 Nov. '77 

21 Oct. '63 

9 June '45 

12 June '80 
31 Mar. '65 

7 Jan. '38 

5 Dec. '55 
10 June '52 

4 Aug. '42 
4 Jan. '40 

13 Sept. '36 
12 Jan. '60 

6 Apr. '36 

22 Mar. '47 

25 Nov. '46 



Date of 

First Ap-jj 

pointment.j 



1 May '93 

1 Sept. '80 

12 July '00 
1 
1 Feb. '00 

19 Aug. '78 

16 May '9& 

8 Oct. '90 

9 Oct. '95 
3 Sept. '91 

16 Sept. '90 
1 Oct. '90 

1 Jan. '96 
8 Jan. '98 

14 Feb. '91 
3 Jan. '87 

12 July '80 
12 July '80 

22 Feb. '69 

28 May '00 

19 June '99 

8 July '86 

2 Jan. '01 
10 Nov. '87 

1 May '60 

1 Mar. '72 

2 Apr. '98 
16 May '76 
27 June '96 

1 Mar. '69 
— Oct. '77 

7 June '80 
18 Dec. '78 

1 Jan. '94 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



m 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF INLAND REVENUE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Present Rank. 




Present | Date of 
Salary. I Birth. 



Cheseldine, James Henry.. ..IProb'y 3rd Class Ex. 
Hamilton. I ciseman. 

Asst. Inspector W-A M 



Deputy Collector In- 
land Rev. (Class B) 
Accountant 



Deputy Collector In- 
land Rev. (Class A). 

Deputy Collector In- 
land Rev. (Class B). 

2nd Class Exciseman... 



Accountant. 



Accountant 

Mechanical Asst.. 



Chisholm, John Joseph 

Pictou, N.S. 

Chisholm, Wm. Noble 

Own Sound, Ont. 

Olark, Albert Forneret 

Stratford. 

€lark, James Alfred 

St. John, N.B. 

Clarke, Thomas 

Pembroke. 

Codd, Hubert James Samuel 

Montreal. 

Oode, Abraham, jr 

Winnipeg 

€oleman, Charles iDeputy Collector In 

Toronto.; land Rev. (Class B) 

Coleman, James John 1st Class Exciseman ... 

Quebec 

€oles, Frank Halstaff 

London, Ont 

Collins, D 

Montreal. 'Inspector of W. & M 
Comte, Louis Andre Alexis 3rd Class Exciseman 

Joseph. Montreal. 

Conklin, Walter McEwan... 

Winnipeg. 

Oon"way,BartholomewJames 

Windsor, Ont. 

Oook, Wm.Reid 

Toronto. 

Costello, John William 

Calgary, N.W.T. 

Cos+igan, James Joseph... f 

Montreal. ( 

Coughlin, Daniel 

London, Ont. 

Coulter, Alex 

Toronto. 

Courtney, John J 

Montreal. 

Coutts, John James 

Guelph, Ont. 

Cowan, Edgar 

St. John, N.B. 

Crawford, William Patrick.. 

Hamilton. 

Crotty, Joho 

Windsor, Ont. 

Croteau, Jules Maurice 

Quebec. 

Crowe, Walter j Accountant 

Windsor, Ont.j 



2nd Class Excisemen.. . 

Special Class Excise 

man. 
1st Class Exciseman.... 

Asst. Inspector W.& M. 

3rd Class Exciseman... 

Inspector of Food 

Mechanical Assistant 

Inspector W. & M. 
2nd Class Exciseman. 



2nd 



do 



Prob'y 3rd Class Ex- 
ciseman. 
Asst. Inspector W. & M 



Accountant 

3rd Class Exciseman... 
Clerk, Cullers Office... 



Deputy Collector In- 
land Rev. (Class B) 
Asst. Inspector W. & M 



Dager, Herman Jeflferson 

Toronto 

Daoust, Joseph A 

Montreal 

Daveluy, Joseph Pierre |3rd Class Exciseman... 

Montreal 

Davy, Edward 

Charlottetown,P.E.r 

Davis, Thomas George 

London, Ont 



Inspector W. & M 

lutyCollect'rli 
evenue (Class A) 



DeputyCollect'rInland 



25 Mar. '01 
1 Sept. '89 
1 July '97 
1 July '85 

24 Apr. '91 

12 July '97 
1 July '01 
1 Nov. '94 

21 Dec. '86 
1 July '97 

9 Feb. '92 

I 13 Dec. '99 
19 Sept. '98 

1 July '01 
- 1 Jan. '81 

1 July '97 

26 Dec. '85 

1 Oct. '86 
4 Apr. '88 
8 Aug. '87 

1 July '01 

1 July '85 

25 Mar. '01 

14 Aug. '79 

1 July '97 I 

I 

18 May '86 j 

4 Sept. '97 I 

1 June '96 i 

6 Oct. '98 i 

4 June '80 | 

17 July '90 I 

15 May '97 i 
1 Jan. '87 ! 



$ cts. ! 
500 00 

600 00 

850 00 

1,000 00 

1,200 00 

600 00 

787 50 

1,400 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,050 00 

800 00 
682 50 

750 00 
1,500 00 
1,000 00 

700 00 

750 00 ) 

350 00 I 

800 00 



750 00 
850 00 
500 00 
700 00 

1,225 00 
750 CO 
750 00 

1,400 00 
850 00 
800 00 
750 00 
950 00 



23 Feb. '74 
5 July '50 
9 Mar. '65 

21 Oct. '36 
1 Sept. '43 

25 Dec. '40 
5 Nov. '59 
3 Jan. '68 

28 Sept. '47 

20 July '57 

15 July '38 

11 July '42 

16 Jan. '66 

10 June '77 
25 July '59 

5 Sept. '49 
14 Feb. '42 

7 Jan. '55 

11 Mar. '41 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



21 Jan. '65 
29 Nov. '56 
7 Apr. '67 
7 Feb. '44 
29 Sept. '38 
— Aug. '32 

15 Dec. '53 

16 Sept. '46 
18 June '54 

14 Oct. '44 
20 May '68 

15 Apr. '43 



1,500 00 il5 Aug. '47 



2 July '00 
1 Sept. '89 

21 July '90 
28 Sept. '74 
24 Apr. '91 

12 July '97 
1 Sept. '89 

20 Mar. '86 

10 Feb. '81 

1 Oct. '85 

16 Apr. '72 

13 Dec. '99 
19 Mar. '98 

1 July '98 

22 Jan. '75 
1 July '92 

26 Dec. '85 

18 Mar. '86 
8 Aug. '87 

1 Jan. '95 

13 Jan. '79 

24 Nov. '00 

14 Aug. '79 
6 Mar. '69 

18 May '86 
4 Sept. '97 

29 Dec. '79 
6 Oct. '98 
4 June '80 

17 July '90 

25 Mar. '97 
1 Nov. '73 



38 



SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OiF INLAND REVENUE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Davis, James 

London, Ont. 

David, Theophile 

Montreal. 

Dawson, William 

Guelph. 

Deland, Alfred Noe 

St. John's, P. Q, 

Demarais, Fred'k 

St. Hyacinthe, 

Dennis, "William Alfred 

Gait, Ont, 

Desaulniers, J. E. A 

Montreal. 

Dessert, Victor 

Montreal. 

Dibblee, William 

St. John, N.B, 

Dick, James Walter 

Toronto 

Dickson, Charles Thompson. 

Kingston, Ont, 

Dingman, Norman Jones 

Kingston, Ont 

Dixon, Henry George Smith, 

Montreal, 

Donaghy, William 

Hamilton, Ont 

Doyle, Bernard Joseph 

Toronto. 

Dudley, William Hipwell 

Toronto 

Dumaine, J. D. Eugene 

St. Hyacinthe 

Dumbrille, John 

Prescott, Ont 

Dumbrille. Richard Willie.., 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Dumouchel, Leandre 

Montreal. 

Dunlop, Charles 

Windsor, Ont 

Duplessis, Charles Zephirin, 

Three Rivers, P.Q 

Dustan, William Moffat 

Pictou, N.S 

Egan, William 

Renfrew, 

Egener, Adolph 

Stratford, Ont. 

Elliott, Thomas Henry 

SaultSte. Marie, Ont. 

Elliott, Thomas Henry 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

Errett, Richard Wm 

Peterboro 

Evans, George Thomas 

Toronto, 

Fahey, Edward 

Kingston, Ont 

Falconer, James E 

Windsor, Ont, 

•Resigned May 1, 1896 ; 



Present Rank. 



2nd Class Exciseman... 

Proby 3rd Class Exci- 
seman. 

Special Class Excise- 
man. 

Deputy Collectorlnland 
Revenue (Class B). 

Deputy Collector(Class 
B). 

Asst. Gas Inspector..... 

'2nd Class Exciseman... 

Asst. Inspector W. & M. 

Deputy Collectorlnland 

Revenue (CI ss B). 
Spec'l Class Exciseman 

CoUec. Inland Revenue 

District Inspector 

2nd Class Exciseman... 

Spec'l Class Exciseman 

2nd Class Exciseman... 

Spec'l Class Exciseman 

Proby 3rd Class Exci- 
seman. 
Gollect.InlandRevenue 

1st Class Exciseman... 

2nd do 

Deputy Collect'rinland 

Revenue (Class B). 
3rd Class Exciseman... 



Inspector W. & M., 



Deputy Collect'rinland 

Revenue (Class B). 
3st Class Exciseman.... 

Asst. Inspector W. & M. 

Deputy Collect. (Class 
B). 

Asst. Inspect. Weights 
and Measures 

.Special Class Excise- 
man. 

3rd do 



3rd 



do 



Date. 



*25 Aug.'99 

19 Feb. '01 
1 Dec. '88 
1 June '98 

27 Apr. '99 
1 June '89 
1 July '01 
1 Mar. '97 

27 Aug. '77 

18 June '96 
1 Oct. '97 

10 July '99 
1 July '93 
1 Apr. '75 
1 July '97 
1 Aug. '86 

19 Feb. '01 
6 Apr. '85 
1 July '97 
1 July '85 
1 Jan. '76 
1 July '83 
1 Oct. '97 

24 July '97 
1 July '97 

16 June ' 93 
1 Aug '99 
1 Aug. '95 

19 Aug. '99 
1 Nov. '77 
1 Nov. '77 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 
850 00 

500 00 

1,500 00 

650 00 

100 00 

100 00 

750 00 

600 00 

300 00 

1,200 00 

1,600 00 

2,000 00 

850 00 

1,400 00 

977 50 

1,600 00 

500 00 

1,800 00 

1,000 00 

850 00 

1,300 00 

750 00 

1,000 00 

400 00 

1,000 00 

600 00 

350 00 

200 00 

1,200 00 

660 00 

750 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 

First Ap- 

j p ointment. 



25 June '62 

23 Mar. '57 

9 Feb. '48 

29 June '62 

18 Sept. '67 

14 Feb. '53 
2 Apr. '65 

31 May '47 

19 Oct. '34 
11 Oct. '57 

20 June '4S 

25 May '45 
18 Dec. '57 

30 Oct. '41 
6 Feb. '57 

15 Apr. '43 

23 Aug. '76 
2 May '23 

17 July '59 

24 Dec. '46 
9 Dec. '39 
2 Jan. '49 
8 Oct. '57 

'45 

26 Sept. '54 
22 July '59 
22 July '59 
13 Apr. '36 

25 Nov. '54 
13 July '41 
20 July '56 



1 Feb. '90 
1 May '00 

12 Nov. '83 
1 June '98 

27 Apr. '99 
1 June '89 

20 July '93 
1 Mar. '97 
9 Nov. '75 
4 Jan. '83 

16 Dec. '68 

17 Feb. '75 

12 Aug. '87 
1 Aug. '73 

17 Dec. '88 

22 Dec. '79 
1 Aug '00 

6 Apr. '85 
11 Sept. '82 
17 June '82 

4 Mar. '73 

13 Dec. '80 

7 Feb. '82 
24 July '97 
13 Aug. '79 
16 June '93 
16 June '93 

1 Aug. '95 

1 Nov. '81 

30 Dec. '75 

23 Dec. '76 



reappointed August 25, 1899. 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST. 



39 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF INLAND REVENUE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P.O. Address. 



Falconer, R. H 

Toronto. 
Ferguson, John 

Prescott, Ont. 

Ferguson, John C | 

St. John, N.B. i 



Findley, Hugh 

Victoria, B.G 

Fitzgerald, Edwin Wellingt 

Hamilton. 



Fitzpatrick, Wm. John 

St John, N. B. 

bert William.... 

Calgary, N-W.T. 

Fletcher, R. W 

Calgary, N.W. T.. 

Flynn, Daniel J 

Toronto. 

Floody, E 

Toronto. 

Fontaine, Arthur 

St. Hyacinthe, P.Q. 

Forest, Eugere Roch 

Montreal. 

Forest, Medard 

L'Epiphanie. P.Q. 

Fortier, Jean Jacques Odilon 

Sorel, P.Q. 

Fortier, Victor 

Ste. Ther^se, P.Q. 

Foster, Henry 

Petrolia, Ont. 

Fournier, Louis Aime 

Montreal. 

Fowler, James Daniel 

Fredericton. 

Fox, John David 

Montreal. 

Fox, Thomas 

Montral. 

Frame, Archibald 

Halifax, N.S. 

Francis, George Mahan 

Port Arthur. 

Frankland, Henry R 

Toronto. 

Eraser, George James 

Brantford, Ont. 
Eraser, Peter 



Present Rank. 



3rd Class Exciseman ... 

.3rd do 

2nd Class Exciseman... 

Inspector of Food 

Inspector W. & M 



Asst. Inspector W.&M. 

1st Class Exciseman.... 

Deputy Collect. Inland 

Revenu (Class B). 
Inspector of Food 



Ist Class Exciseman.. 
Preventive OflScer 



Inspector of Electric 

Light & E.L. Meters. 

Cashier 



Pictou, N.S. 

Freed, Augustus Toplady... 

Hamilton. 

Freeland, Anthony 

Ottawa. 

Gallagher, Francis 

Quebec. 

Geldart, Oliver Alexander... 

St. John, N.B. 

George, John 

Eganville, Ont. 

Gerald, Charles. 

Toronto, Ont. 



Dept. Collector Inland 
Revenue (Class B)... 

Dept. Collector Inland 
Revenue, (Class B)... 

Dept. Collector Inland 
Revenue, (Class B)... 

1st Class Exciseman, 

Asst. Inspector W.&M. 

Gas Inspector 

Assistant Accountant.. 
1st Class Exciseman.... 

Inspector W. & M 

Asst. Inspector W.& M. 
Coll. Inland Revenue.. 
Dept. Collector (Cl.B). 
Coll. Inland Revenue.. 
Inspector of W. & M.... 
Coll. Inland Revenue.. 

Specification Clerk 

1st Class Exciseman.,.. 
Dept. ColL (Class B).. 
Special CI. Exciseman. 



Date. 



July '00 

Nov. '77 

July '93 
July '88 
Mar. '93 

Mar. '91 

July '97 

Oct. '97 

Mar. '00 

Jan. '91 

Apr. '00 

Jan. '01 

July '88 

Jan '01 

July '01 

Nov. '97 

July '01 

June '94 

Feb .'98 

May '93 

Nov. '80 

Nov. '97 

Jan. '98 

Jan. '99 

July '90 

July '97 

May '94 

July '01 

Dec. '83 

July '97 

Mar. '94 

Nov. '80 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 
630 00 

750 00 

850 00 ) 

200 00 j 

800 00 

750 00 
1,000 00 

800 00 

200 00 
],000 00 

800 00 



1,260 01 

200 00 

1,000 00 

600 00 

850 00 

600 00 

200 00 

1,260 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

1,900 09 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,600 00 

1,400 00 

750 00 

1,000 00 

200 00 

1,600 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



27 Jan. '71 
17 Apr. '26 

4 May '39 
6 Sept. '32 

2 Sept. '53 

3 Feb. '69 
12 May '53 
12 May. '53 

4 Dec. '44 
26 Mar. '57 

2 Mar. '80 

5 Sept. '54 
29 May '59 

25 Sept. '48 
5 Feb. '67 

26 Apr. '54 
12 Oct. '61 

5 Sept. '53 

25 Mar. '65 
10 Aug. '45 

2 Mar. '32 
12 July '40 

1 Sept. '59 

6 July '41 

2 Apr. '54 
8 Oct. '35 
1 Apr. '56 

24 Dec. '34 

26 May '63 
5 Nov. '59 

23 Oct. '52 



25 Jan. '90, 
16 Nov. '76. 

18 May '5T 
1 July '9» 

20 May '90 

19 Oct. '91 
25 Sept. '97 
25 Sept. '97 
24 Dec. '83 

16 Apr. '00 
1 Jan. '01 
1 Mar. '85 

30 Jan. '01 

17 Mar. '85 
1 Nov, '97. 

20 May '93. 
1 June '94. 
1 Feb. '97 
5 June '85. 

21 Apr. '76 

18 Nov. '97 
8 Jan. '98 
1 June '99 

10 July '84 
1 Feb. '91 

23 May '94. 
1 July '01 

12 Dec. '83 
1 July '92 

14 Mar. '94 

16 Dec. '76 



40 



SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF INLAND REVENUE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Gerald, Walter Henry 

Prescott. 

Gervaig, Samuel.. 

Montreal. 

Gill, William 

Victoria, B.C. 

Girard, Irenee 

London, Ont. 

Girdlestone,Robt. JohnM. f 

Winnipeg. \ 

Goodman, Arthur William.. 

Perth. 

Gorman, Arthur Matthias... 

Halifax, N.S. 

Gosnell, Thomas Salter 

Winnipeg. 

Gow, James f 

Windsor, Ont. \ 

Gow, John, Eckford 

Windsor, Ont. 

Graham, Wm. Johnstone., f 

Owen Sound, Ont. ( 

Graham, William Thomas... 

Toronto. 

Graham, A. Louis 

Toronto. 

Grant, Henry Hugh 

Halifax, N.S. 

Gravel, Amable Irene 

Three Rivers. 

Grimason, Thomas 

Kingston, Ont. 

Grosbois (de), Charles B 

Sherbrooke, P.Q. 

Guay, Alphonse 

Quebec. 

Guay, G.N 

Quebec. 

Hagan, James 

Ottawa. 

Hagarty, Patrick 

Halifax, N.S. 

Hanley, Archibald 

Kingston, Ont. 

Harney, Thomas 

Quebec. 
Harris, J. G 

Hart, Philip Dacres 

Brantford, Ont. 

Harwood, Jos. Octave Alain 

Montreal . 

Hawkins, Augustus Carayon 

Montreal 

Hawkins, William Louis 

Winnipeg. 

Hayhurst, Thos. H 

Hamilton. 

Hayward, Walter John 

London, Ont. 

Hubert, Charles Dupont 

Three Rivers, P.Q. 

Hubert, Jos. Alph. Pacifique. 

Montreal. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



I Present 
i Salary. 



Spec. Class Exciseman 

Asst. Inspector W.& M. 

District Inspector 

1st Class Exciseman ... 

Dept,Collect.( Class B) 
Asst. Inspector W.«fe M. 
1st Class, Exciseman... 

2nd do 

Collector Inland Rev.. 

District Inspector 

Inspect, of Distilleries.. 
Spec. Class Exciseman 

Collector Inland Rev... 

Gas Inspector 

2nd Class Exciseman... 

3rd do 

Collector Inland Rev... 

Inspector W. & M 

Dept. Collector Inland 

Revenue (Cla^s A). 
3rd Class Exciseman... 

Asst. Inspector W.& M. 

Inspector W. & M 

Warehouseman 

3rd Class Exciseman.... 

Asst. Accountant 

Book-keeper & Cashier. 

Dept. Collector Inland 

Revenue (Class A). 
2nd Class Exciseman... 

Prob. 3rd Class Excise- 
man. 
1st do 

Accountant 

1st Glass Exciseman ... 

Inspector W. & M 

Collector Inland Rev.., 

Asst. Inspector W.& M, 



1 Jan. '88 
6 June '91 
1 July '85 
1 Jan. '88 

19 Sept. '89 
1 July '87 
1 July '88 

1 July '01 

1 July '98 

1 Jan. '87 
6 June '01 
1 Mar. '99 

1 July '97 

27 Nov. '89 

1 July '97 

12 Aug. '00 

15 Oct. '81 
10 Feb. '97 

1 Apr. '87 
21 Dec. '00 

24 Dec. '92 
1 Nov. '97 

16 May '96 
6 Apr. '69 

12 Dec. '89 
1 July '97 
5 Jan. '97 

10 Dec. '80 

25 May '01 
16 Aug. '95 

1 Dec. '88 

1 July '01 
14 Aug. '79 

20 Oct. '80 

2 Apr. '92 



$ cts, 
i 1,500 00 

I 800 00 

i 2,500 00 

j 1,000 00 

i 1,000 00 ) 

200 00 I 

j 1,000 00 

i 750 00 

\ 2,070 00 

j I 2,500 00 
\ 1,200 00 

I 1,200 00 ) 
i 200 00 j 

I 1,000 00 

I 

I 630 00 

i 

i 1,800 00 

800 00 
1,200 00 

615 00 

700 00 
1,200 00 

650 00 

760 00 
1,000 00 

850 00 
1,000 00 

850 00 

500 00 
1,000 00 
1,200 00 

850 00 
1,400 00 
1,200 00 

800 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



7 Sept. '57 

25 July — 
IJuly '37 

24 July '47 

14 Not. '43 
22 Feb. '66 

22 Oct. '64 
— June '50 

17 Oct. '26 

14 Jan. '69 

16 Feb. '44 
11 May '66 

6 July '76 

15 Apr. '39 
3 Aug. '60 

23 Feb. '56 

7 Nov. '75 
3 May '62 

24 Apr. '55 

17 Mar. '56 

5 Apr. '37 
20 June '46 
27 Nov. '47 
23 Apr. '57 

18 Dec. '51 
9 Nov. '75 

16 Mar. '70 

26 Jan. '64 
3 Oct. '68 

18 Feb. '39 

6 Oct. '45 
31 May '76 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



14 Apr. '84 
1 Oct. '86 

19 Dec. '70 

3 May '80 

17 Feb. '73 
1 Dec. '85 

1 Sept. '91 

27 Jan. '76 

28 Nov. '66 
7 Nov. '88 

1 June '68 

18 Mar. '90 

12 Feb. '00 
1 Oct. '79 

10 Feb. '97 
7 Apr. '81 

30 May '98 

24 Dec. '92 
1 Nov. '96 

15 Dec. '92 

6 Apr. '59 
1 July '80 

1 May '82 
5 Jan. '97 

7 Jan. '80 

25 May '01 

13 Feb. '91 
18 Sept. '79 

2 Apr. '97 

14 Aug. '79 

11 Oct. '76 
28 Mar. '92 



CIVIL SERVICE MST 



41 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF INLAND REVENUE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P.O. Address. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



DeputyOolIector(Classi 1 



epu 
A) 



1st Class Exciseman ...' 1 



Helliwell, Horatio Nelson ...| 1st Class Exciseman....! 1 
Toronto. 

Henderson, Wilbur 

Toronto. 

Henwood, George 

Victoria, B.C. 

Hesson, Charles Ashton Collector Inland Rev..| 1 

St. Catharines, Ont.l i 

Hicks, William Henry Deputy Collector Inl'dl 1 

London Revenue (Class B). ! 

Higman, Ormond Chief Electrical En- 7 

Ottawa. I gineer. j 

Hill, Arthur Marcjus Deputy Collector Inrdi28 

St. John.N.B.! Revenue (Class B). | 

Hinchey, Edward Henry Accountant ! 1 

Ottawa 

Hobbs, George Nixon 

Hamilton, Ont 
Hodder, William Edwards... Deputy Collector Inl'd 

Kaslo, B.C.! Revenue (Class B). 
Howard, Wm .Walter Shanly| 1st Class Exciseman.... 
Toronto.! 

Howden, Richard JDeputy Collector Inl'd 

Peterboro'l Revenue (Class B). 
Howell, Thomas Deputy Collector Inl'd 



1st Class Exciseman 



Kamloops, B.C 



Guelph, Ont. 

Hubley, Howard Hy 

Halifax, N.S. 

Hughes, Henry 

Charlottetown. 

Hughes, Richard Anderson. 

Windsor. 

Hurst, Levi Brown 

Toronto. 

Her, Burritt 

Toronto. 

Ironside, George Arthur 

Port Arthur, Ont. 

Irwin, Robert 

Hamilton, Ont. 
Irwin, Samuel 



Ives, Geo. Canning 



Galgary. 



James, Thomas Cuthbert..... 
Halifax, N.S 

Jameison, Robert C , 

Toronto 
Jarvis, Henry.. 
Hfi 



Revenue (Class B) 
3rd Class Exciseman... 

1st do 

Asst. Inspector W. & M. 

do 

Ist Class Exciseman ... 

Chief Dep Coll.In.Rev. 

Coll. Inland Revenue.. 

Ist Class Exciseman.... 

Asst.Inspector W. & M. 

Deputy Gollect'r(Cla8S 
B) and Preventive 
Officer. 

Accountant 



Special ClassExcisem'n 



Jan. '88 
July '97 
July '01 
Feb. '88 
May '88 
May '95 
Sept. '75 
Sept. '00 
July '98 
Apr. '01 
July '97 
Feb. '89 
Dec. '97 
Oct. '80 
July '01 
July '92 
Oct. '88 
July '98 
Nov. '80 
Apr. '70 
July '97 
Apr. '85 
Apr. '96 



familton, Ont 

Johnson, John Jas 1st Class Exciseman ...' 1 

Owen Sound, Ont 



Johnson, William. 



1 July '83 

1 Jan. '91 

Asst.InspectorW.&M.!l9 Mar. '98 

July '01 



Present 
Salary. 



Inspector W & M |14 

do Gas I 1 

do Electric Light 27 

1 Oct. '93 



Belleville, Ont 

Johnston, George Elliott ISrd Class Exciseman 

Prescott, Ont.! I 

Johnstone, James Kennedy f Inspector of Gas '25 

Toronto.! do Electric Light!27 

Jones, Andrew ,3rd Class Exciseman... 1 

Toronto. 



Aug. '79 
Nov, '80 
May "95 



July '87 
May '95 
July '97 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First As- 
pointment. 



$ ctg. 
1,000 00 ;18 

3 



1,500 00 

992 50 

1,200 00 

1,000 00 

2,400 00 

500 00 



830 00 7 



977 50 

600 00 

1,000 00 

800 00 



500 CO 30 



750 00 

892 50 

600 00 

650 00 

998 75 

1,600 00 

1,0C0 00 

1,000 00 

700 00 

400 00 

1,000 00 

1,200 00 

600 00 

892 50 

1,200 00) 
350 00 \ 

750 00 

I 1,700 00 
750 00 



Oct. '53 
Oct. '56 
Sept. '64 
Mar. '60 
Mar. '55 
Mar. '50 
July '41 
Mar. '72 
Feb. '55 
June '60 
Feb. '58 
Feb. '30 
June '.58 
Jan. '37 
Feb. '69 
June '42 
Aug. '47 
Nov. '70 
Nov. '51 
Jan. '40 
Mar. '41 
May '28 
Sept. '48 

Apr. '56 
Mar. '43 
Oct. '45 
Apr. '61 

Sept. '42 

June '32 

Oct. '49 
Nov. '63 



7 Nov. '81 

8 Mar. '83 
19 Dec. '81 
17 Jan. '83 

14 Mar. '81 
1 July '94 

28 Sept. ' 75 
I 1 July '87 

15 May '80 

19 Apr. '01 
23 Sept. '90 
25 Feb. '89 

9 Dec. '97 

20 Oct. '80 
9 May '92 
1 July '92 
5 Oct. '88 

8 Mar. '92 
4 Jan. '76 
1 Apr. '70 

22 Dec. '87 

9 Apr. '85 

10 May 95 

11 Sept. '82 
1 July '87 

19 Mar. '98 

12 Feb. '92 

14 Aug. '79 

21 Oct. '81 

— Sept. '83 
! 1 Sept. '01 



42 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII 
DEPARTMENT OF INLAND REVENUE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



A. 1902 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Jones, Richard \ 

B.C., Victoria. 

Jubenville, J. P 

Windsor, Ont. 

Kearney, D. J 

Montreal. 

Keeler, George Samuel 

Prescott, Ont. 

Keilty, Thomas 

Prescott, Ont. 

Kelly, J. T 

St. John. 

Kelly, Mencer John 

Quebec. 

Kelly, Daniel 

Toronto. 

Kenning, James Hogan 

Windsor, Ont. 

Keogh, Peter Mary 

Windsor, Ont. 

Kidd, Thomas 

Seaforth,Ont. 

Kilroy, Edmond Thomas 

Guelph 

King, Richard Marsters 

Halifax, N. S. 

Knowlson, James Baine 

Peterboro'jOnt. 

Laidman, Richard Herbert.. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Lambert, J. Ars^ne 

Montreal. 

Lane, Thos. Michael 

Montreal. 

Laporte, George 

Ottawa. 

Lariviere, Alexandre C 

Winnipeg. 
Larue, Jean-Bte Alexandre.. 



Present Rank. 



Coll. Inland Revenue... 
Inspector of Gas 



2nd Class Exciseman... 

3rd do 

2nd do 

Deputy Collect. Inland 

Revenue (Class A). 
Preventive OflBcer 



Asst. Inspector W.& M. 

Inspector W.&M 

Coll. Inland Revenue... 
3rd Class Exciseman... 

Food Inspector 

1st Class Exciseman.... 

Deputy Collect. Inland 
Revenue (Class A). 

Deputy Collect. (Class 
B), 

Asst. Inspector W. &M. 

3rd Class Exciseman.. 

Asst. Accountant 

3rd Class Exciseman.. 

1st do 

Deputy Collect. Inland 

Revenue (Class B) 
Coll. Inland Revenue 



2nd Class Exciseman... 
Coll. Inland Revenue 



LaRue, George 

Quebec 

Laurier, Jos. Laurent , 

Montreal 

Lawlor, Henry 

Montreal 

Lawlor, John Joseph Proby 3rd Class Excr 

Hamilton, Ont.! seman. 

Lawrence, George Caraigue Inspector W. & M 

Sydney, C.B.I 

LeBel, J. A. W !A sst. Inspector W.& M 

Quebec! 

Lecours, Henri Theophile...iAccountant 

Montreal.! 

Lee, Edward jlst Class Exciseman .. 

London, Ont. | 

Lemoine, Jules; :3rd do 

Quebec] 

Lepine, Louis • 3rd do 

Quebec. 

LeVasseur, Ls. Nazaire Z. j 

Quebec 

L^vequCj Hector jPorter and Messenger, 

Ottawa.! Analyst Branch 



Inspector of Gass.... 
do Electric Light 



Date. 



1 June '87 
1 Aug. '84 

1 Jan. '88 

30 May '00 
1 July '93 
1 July '85 
9 July '90 

27 Dec. '80 
1 Jan. '00 
1 Aug. '82 

20 Feb. '80 

31 May '90 
1 July '97 
1 Sept. '87 
1 July '72 

12 Apr. '90 
5 Mar. '01 
1 July '00 
1 Oct. '83 
1 July '01 

3 Feb. '98 
16 Feb. '78 

1 July '01 

1 July '97 

25 Mar. '01 

2 Nov. '98 
1 Feb. '01 

4 May "93 
1 Jan. '88 
1 Oct. '83 

1 Oct. '83 

2 Oct. '78 
27 May '95 

26 May '98 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 

1,500 00) 
200 00 i 



850 00 

630 00 

850 00 

1,300 00 

700 00 

800 00 

1,300 00 

2,200 00 

750 00 

500 00 

],000 00 

1,300 00 

700 00 

700 00 

607 50 

1,200 00 

750 00 

850 00 

900 00 

1,980 00 

750 00 

2,160 00 

500 00 

800 00 

1,100 00 

1,400 00 

1,000 00 

750 00 

750 00 

1 ,000 00 

500 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



4 Feb, '51 

19 June '54 

8 Apr. '73 

9 Apr. '36 
26 July '38 
13 May '48 

3 Feb. '53 
17 Mar. '43 

26 Apr. '35 
24 June '42 

7 Sept. '30 

27 Dec. '72 

22 Feb. '43 
15 Apr. '33 

27 Dec. '57 
6 Jan. '76 
3 Sept. '68 

13 July '45 
17 Nov. '71 

23 June '66 

21 Dec '34 
9 June '61 

15 Dec. '53 

6 Aug. '75 

28 Dec. '38 
28 Oct. '66 

22 Feb. '35 

14 Feb. '41 
19 Oct. '54 
19 Oct. '38 

6 Feb. '48 

23 Aug. '77 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 Aug. '84 

5 Jan. '87 

1 Dec. '99 

7 Dec. '87 

15 Dec '79 

15 Apr. '89 
27 Dec. '80 

1 Jan. '00 

24 Jan. '67 
1 Sept. '79 

29 May '56 
1 July '92 

14 Aug. '79 
1 Oct. '63 

12 Oct. '89 

20 Aug. '00 

25 Mar. '91 
1 Sept. '82 

29 Apr. '93 
3 Feb. '98 

16 Feb. '78 
16 Dec. '97 

1 Oct. '79 

20 Aug '00 

1 Jan. '84 

26 Mar. '97 
1 Dec '79 

1 Nov. '81 
July '80 

18 Oct. '80 

2 Oct. '78 
26 May '98 



20 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



4S 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF INLAND REVENUE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Logan, John 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Long, W.H. A 

Winnipeg. 

Lyons, Edward 

Kingston, Ont. 

Macdonald, Angus John 

Pictou, N.S. 

Macdonald, Archibald B 

Prescott, Ont. 

Macdonald, John A 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Macfarlane, Thos., F.R.S.C. 

Ottawa. 

Maciatyre, Donald 

Montreal. 

Magness, Robert 

Winnipeg, 
do do 

Mainville, Charles Phileas... 
Montreal. 

Male, Thomas 

Listowell, Ont. 

Ma)o, Toussaint. 

Montreal. 

Maranda, Nicholas Arthur... 

Montreal. 

Marcon, Frank Evans 

Windsor, Ont. 

Marentetle, Alexandre 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Marion, Jos. Eugene Edm... 

Joliette, P.Q. 

Marshall, Ferdinand 

Prescott, Ont. 

Mason, Frederick 

Perth, Ont. 

Mercier, Charles Amedee 

Quebec. 

Metcalf, William Franklin... 

Toronto. 

Miller. Archibald 

Halifax, N.E. 

Miller, Joseph Elwood ( 

Vancouver, B C. ( 

Miller, William Frederick ... 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Millier, Elie 

Montreal. 

Miligan, Robert John 

Toronto. 

Milliken, Edwin 

St. Catharines, Ont. 

Moore, Theophilus 

Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

Moreau, Auguste , 

Joliette. 

Moreau, Joseph Alfied f 

Quebec. \ 

Morin, Jean Pascal 

St. Hyacinthe,P.Q. 

Mulhern, Michael Matthew f 

Cornwall, Ont. | 

Munro, Hugh David f 

Yarmouth. N.S. 1 



2nd Class Exciseman... 

2nd do 

1st Class Exciseman... 

Deputy Collect. Inland 
Revenue (Class B)... 

Special Class Excise- 
man. 

Inspector W. & M 



Present Rank. 



Chief Analyst 

1st Class Exciseman.... 

Inspector W. & M 

Gas & Electric Light' g 

3rd Class Exciseman... 

Gas Inspector 

2nd Class Exciseman... 

Prob'y. 3rd Class Ex- 
ciseman. 
2nd Class Exciseman... 

Asst. InspectorW.& M 

3rd Class Exciseman... 

Unclassified do ... 

Special Class Excise- 
man. 

essenger & Preven- 
tive Officer. 

Special Class Excise- 
man. 

I Inspector of Gas 

\ do Electric Light 

Coll. Inland Revenue.. 

Inspector of Gas 

Coll. Inland Revenue.. 

3rd Class Exciseman.... 
Asst. Inspector W.& M. 
2nd Class Exciseman.... 

Deputy Collect. Inland 
Revenue (Class B). 

Deputy Collect. Inland 
Revenue (Class B). 

Caretaker, W. & M 

do Gas Office 

Deputy Collect. Inland 
Revenue (Class A). 

Coll. Inland Revenue.. 

Gas Inspector 

3rd Class Exciseman... 

Asst. Inspector of Gas. 



Date. 



1 Jan. 
1 July 
1 July 

27 Oct. 
1 Apr. 

20 July 

20 Mar. 
1 July 
1 May 
1 May 
1 July 

25 May 
1 June 

15 Jan. 
1 July 

,14 Aug. 

8 July 
1 Nov. 

1 July 

2 May 
1 Jan. 

1 Dec. 
27 May 
31 May 

1 Dec. 

1 July 

1 July 
25 Oct. 

1 July 
12 Dec. 

9 Jan. 



'01 
'97 
'98 
'00 



'97 

'97 

'97 

'97 

'98 

'76 

01 

'97 

'79 

'91 

'77 

'75 

'98 

'92 

'75 
'95 
'90 
'93 
'97 

'83 

'86 

'84 

'90 

'99 



1 May 
1 May 
1 Apr. 


'84 
'84 
'01 


1 July 

31 May 

1 July 

1 July 


'83 
'90 

'82 
'84 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 
850 00 

750 00 

1,000 00 

700 00 

1,200 00 

1,400 00 

3,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,400 00 

300 00 

750 00 

100 00 

850 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 

800 00 

750 00 

850 09 

1,500 00 

750 00 

1,200 00 

1,250 00 

1,500 001 
300 00 ] 
2,200 00 

750 00 

800 00 

850 00 

1,000 00 

600 00 

300 00 ) 

300 00 I 

800 00 

1,000 001 
100 00 J 
750 00 I 
100 00 ' 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



22 Nov. '30 
7 Aug. '72 

22 Sept. '62 
17 Jan. '48 
30 Dec. '55 
25 Oct. '35 

5 Mar. '34 
17 Feb '46 
21 Feb. '50 

1 Feb '50 

13 Apr. '69 
28 Aug. '49 
16 July '29 

14 July '65 
7 Mar. '69 

19 Feb. '34 

20 Oct. '59 
5 Feb. '35 

5 Apr. '50 

14 Apr. '53 

23 Nov. '37 

1 June '35 

19 Mar. '59 

23 Nov. '41 

11 Dec. '44 

24 Oct. '37 
11 Nov. '47 

6 May '42 

20 Sept. '45 

15 Jan. '34 
28 Mar. "42 

9 Feb. '55 
28 July '46 



1 Nov.r75 
14 Dec. '99 
10 May '87 
27 Oct. '98 

2 Aug. '87 
20 July '86 

20 Mar. '8& 
10 Feb '90 

1 Jan '89 

1 Jan. '89 
12 Dec. '92 
25 Jan. '98 
27 July '74 

2 Aug '00 

21 May '8D 

14 Aug. '79 

8 Jan. '91 
5 Dec. '7(> 

24 Feb. '72 
2 May '98 

15 July '71 

1 Dec. '75 

12 Dec. '83 
15 July '73 

7 July '79 

25 Oct. '86 

2 May '74 
1 Jan. '74 

9 Jan. '99 

1 May '84 
1 Apr. '01 
7 Aug. '76 
1 July '81 



44 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF INLAND REVENUE-OU.TSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P.O. Address. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



Murdoch, James .... 

Orillia. 

Murray, Alfred Sutton E 

Toronto, Ont. 

Murray, David 

St. Hyacinthe. 

McAllister, Andrew 

Belleville, Ont. 

McAloney, Joseph A j 

Nanaimo. j 
I 

McClosky, John Richard 

St. John, N.B. 

McCoy, William 

Belleville, Ont. 

McCraney, H. P 

Rossland, B. C. 

McCuaig, Augustus Finlay.. 

Belleville, Ont. 

McCutcheon, H. M 

Greenwood, B.C. 

McDonald, A W 

Fleming, Assa. 

McDonald, John 

Hamilton, Ont. 

McFarland, Chas. Davis 

Kingston, Ont. 

McFarlane, Jas., sr 

Ottawa. 

McFee, Allan Cameron 

Belleville. 

McGill, Anthony,B.A.,B.Sc. 

Ottawa. 

McGuire, Terrance 

Ottawa. 

McLenaghan, Nathaniel 

Perth, Ont. 

McNiven, J. D 

Winnipeg. 

McPhie, Dona'd 

Hamilton, Ont. 

McPhie, William Herbert.... 

Hamilton, Ont. 

McSween, James 

London, Ont. 

Nash, Samuel C 

Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

Nash, A. F 

London, Out. 

Nicholls, James Thomas 

Owen Sound, Ont. 

Noonan, T. H 

Perth Ont. 

O'Brien, Edward Charles.... 

Guelph. 

O'Brien. James Francis 

Hamilton, Ont. 

O'Donnell, John 

Kingston, Ont. 

O'Donnell, Michael James... 

Montreal. 

O'Donohue, Michael John... 

Guelph, Ont. 



Asst. Inspector W.&M. 

2nd Class Exciseman... 

1st do 

C ollect .Inl' nd Revenue 

Deputy C Hector Inland 

Revenue. (Class B)... 

Asst.Inspector W.&M. 

do do Gas 

1st Class Exciseman.... 

Special Class Excisem.. 

Dep. Collect. (Class B) 

do 

do 
Asst. Inspector W. & M. 

do 

1st do 

Asst.Inspector Weight? 

and Measures. 
2nd Class Exciseman... 



Asst. Chief Analyst. 



Deputy ^ 'Hector Inland 

Revenue (Class A). 
Collector of Inland Rev 

Deputy Collect. Inland 
Revenue (Class B). 

f Inspector of Gas 

j do Electric Light 
Asst. Inspector of Gas 

and Gas Meters. 
1st Class Exciseman.... 

Collect.InlandRevenue 

Inspector Gas and Gas 
Meters & Electric Lt. 

DeputyCollect'r (Class 
B). 

Deputy Collect. (Class 

2nd Class Exciseman... 
1st do 

3rd do 

Messenger & Caretaker 
1st Class Exciseman. 



April' 97 

Oct. '80 

July '97 

Feb. '82 

July '97 

Jan. '98 
Mar. '98 
July '97 

June '01 

Sept. '99 

July '86 

Sept. '99 

July '94 

Feb. '81 

July '97 

Jan. '96 

July '01 

July '87 

Mar. '00 

July '97 

July '98 

Sept. '76 
May '95 
July '00 

Feb. '84 

Jan. '78 

Dec. '99 

Sept. '89 

July '00 

July '93 

Jan. '88 

July '84 

Oct. '00 

July '97 



$ cts. 
600 00 

850 00 

1,000 00 

1,980 00 

300 001 

350 00 I" 
100 00 J 
1,000 00 

1,200 00 

900 00 

800 00 

600 00 

700 00 

800 00 

1,000 00 

600 00 

750 00 

2,000 00 

1,168 75 

1,400 00 

250 00 

1 1,800 00 
600 00 

1,000 00 

1,200 00 

1,050 00 

1,000 00 

645 00 

850 00 

1,000 00 

750 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 



— May '3i ;26 April '97 

i 
17 Aug. '48 ' 1 Jan. '71 

23 Jan. '70 i 1 Jan. '90 

14 Aug. '43 ;21 May '72 



27 Sept. '55 

4 Dec. '54 

7 July '55 
2 Dec. '59 

29 Mar. '50 
4 June '54 

26 Nov. '68 
1 May '36 

25 Sept. '69 

28 Oct. '41 

11 Aug. '76 
18 April '47 

9 Feb. '49 
17 Nov. '37 
10 Feb. '61 

28 June '36 

8 Nov. '82 

26 Nov. '51 
4 Oct. '34 

22 June '53 
16 Dec. '33 

6 Jan. '74 

27 Mar. '68 
20 Dec. '58 

7 Nov. '42 
13 Sept. '63 

12 Nov. '69 



112 July '97 

jl2 July '87 
I 1 Mar. '84 

! 

j 1 Sept. '99 
'30 July '86 

7 Sept. '99 
jl9 Oct. '93 
;i4Feb. '81 

8 Aug. '91 
1 17 April' 90 
,28 May '96 
I 1 July '87 

1 June '98 
28 Dec. '93 

11 July '98 

I 1 Sept. '76 
I 3 July '00 

,30 May '79 

12 Dec. '70 
12 Dec. '99 

7 July '73 

3 July '00 

i 1 Nov. '86 

I 9 Oct. '82 

I 

|l7Feb. '83 

25 Jan. '96 

1 Jan. '92 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



45 



SESSIONAL. PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF INLAND REVENUE-ODTSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P.O. Address. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



O'Flaherty, Edward John... 
Montreal. 

O'Flaherty, M. J 

Quebec. 

O'Leary, Thomas Joseph 

Toronto. 

Orr, Henry N 

Brantford. 

Opborne, Frank Alfred 

Edmonton. 

O'Sullivan, Daniel 

Vancouver, B.C. 

Panneton, George Edouard 

Montreal. 

Pape, James 

Toronto 

Parent, Frederick 

Ottawa. 

Parkinson, E. B f 

Vancouver, j 

Parson, Charles Herbert 

Golden, B.C. 

Patton, James 

Quebec. 

Patterson, Chas. Edw.Alex. 

Montreal. 

Pelletier, Narcisse George... 

Rivi6re-du-Loup. 

Petit, Jean-Baptiste 

Quebec. 

Poirier, Joseph Nathaniel... 

Victoriaville. 

Pole, Charles William 

Belleville, Ont 

Powell, JohnBleeker — 

Guelph, Ont. 

Prefontaine, Fulgence H 

Quebec. 

Prosser, Elijah 

Keswick, Oat. 

Provost, Jean Jacques 

Three Rivers, P.Q. 

Quinn, John Dwver 

Granby, P.Q. 

Ralston, Timothy.... 

Berthierville, P.Q. 

Renaud, AlbertH 

Montreal. 

Rennie, George 

Stratford 

Richard, Dosithe.. . 

Sussex, N.B. 

Ridgman, A H 

Victoria 

Rinfret, Come Isaie 

Quebec. 

Ritchie, Alex. J 

Halifax. 

Robinson, Reuben Simon..,. 

Wabigoon, Ont. 

Roche, H. G f 

Ottawa, i 



3rd Class Exciseman... 1 12 
Asst. Inspector of Gas. i 24 
1st Class Exciseman.... 1 



1st 



do 



Deputy Collect. Inland 
Revenue (Class B). 

Deputy Collect. Inland 
Revenue (Class A). 

3rd Class Exciseman... 



Sept. '90 
April '93 
July '88 
Jan. '00 
Jan. '98 
Aug. '94 
Jan. '83 



I Asst. Inspector of Gas. 1 20 

do Elect. Light. 25 

Asst. Mgr Meth. Spirits 7 

Warehouse. 
Deputy Collect. Inland 1 Apr. '98 

Revenue (Class A). ! 

Inspector of Food 1 

Deputy Collect. Inland 1 
: Revenue (Class B> 
Superv. of Cullers 30 



May '93 
Sept. '95 
Jan. '96 



July '00 
Apr. '96 



, Ont*. I 



Deputy Collect. Inland 23 
Revenue (Class B 

Deputy Collect. Inlaiid 1 
Revenue (Class B). 

Asst. Inspector W.& M. 

Deputy Collect. Inland 1 
Revenue (Class B). 

Deputy Collect. Inland I 
Revenue (Class A). 

Collector Inland Rev.. I 

Asst. Inspector W.& M.j 9 

Preventive Officer 24 

Asst. Inspector W & M. — 

Spec. Class Exciseman j 1 

Deputy Collect. Inland] 1 

Revenue (Class B). 
2nd Class Exciseman...; 1 

Deputy Collect. Inland, 21 
Revenue (Class A). 

Gas Inspector I 9 

Asst. Inspector W.&M.i 7 



June '82 

May '01 

July '99 

Jan. '80 

July '01 

Dec. '86 

May '87 

Apr. '01 

Dec. '97 

Nov. '80 

Dec. '88 

May '01 

July '01 

Dec. '85 

July '90 

July '80 



Present 
Salary. 



2nd Class Exciseman...! ^ "^"^^ '^^ 
Aug. '99 
May '00 
June '01 



District Inspector of] 25 
Inland Revenue. | 

Asst. Inspector of Gas; 9 
and Gas Meters. j 



Deputy Collect. Inland, 12 
I Revenue (Class B). | 

jlnspector of Gas 1 

do Elect. Light:27 May '95 

I I 



July '99) 



$ cts. 
750 00 

800 00 
1,000 00 

913 75 

6 00 
1,035 00 

750 00 

{ 1,000 00 
1,000 00 

1,100 00^ 

200 00 I 
200 00 

2,100 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
700 00 

1,365 00 

1,980 00 
600 00 
400 00 
700 00 

1,200 00 
500 00 
750 00 

1,200 00] 

200 00 J 
600 00 

787 50 

2,500 00 

500 00 

50 00 

1,050 00 



Date of i ^^.tJ%°„^ 
n\r.*u ^ rust Ap- 
^''^^- pointment. 



—About '40 

13 July '48 

14 July '53 

15 May '74 
13 May '60 

6 Feb. '71 

23 Jan. '49 

6 Aug. '46 
.23 June '67 

29 Nov. '62 

16 May '68 
5 June '29 

13 Oct. '52 

8 Mar. '57 
23 Dec. '45 
15 June '67 
15 Dec. '45 

5 Aug. '48 
2 Mar. '45 

7 Sept. '37 

9 Sept. '39 

6 Jan. '49 
20 Oct. '53 

25 Jan. '64 

2 Aug. '42 

26 July '34 
28 Feb. '64 

6 Sept. '47 
19 Mar. '54 
— Sept. '64 

30 Jan. '50 



27 Dec. '86 

24 April '93 

1 Jan. '83 

7 May '97 

22 Apr. '92 
12 May '90 

5 Aug. '82 

20 May '93 
1 May '91 

12 May '93 
1 Apr. '96 

30 June '82 

23 May '01 
1 July '99 

6 Jan. '80 

13 July '97 
1 July '83 
9 July '73 
1 July '97 

24 Dec. '97 
1 Nov. '80 
1 Jan. '84 

18 Apr. '01 

7 Dec. '94 

24 Jan. '67 
7 July '80 
IJuly '95 

25 Aug. '99 
7 May '00 

12 June '01 

1 July '89 



46 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF INLAND REVENUE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Rork, Thomas 

Peterborough, Ont. 



Ross, Harold Edward ( 

Winnipeg. ( 

Ross, Samuel Foster 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Rouleau, Joseph 

Quebec. 

Rousseau, Elzear H 

Granby, P.Q. 
Rowan, William Edward 



Quebec. 

Peterborough. 

Montreal, 



Roy, George.. 

Rudkins, Wm 

Ryan, W 

Saucier, Xavier 

Winnipeg 
Schram, Richard Louis H ... 3rd Class Exciseman 
St. Catharines, Ont. 

Scullion, William James 1st do 

Montreal 

Shanacy, Michael 

Toronto 



Present Rank. 



Deputy Collect. Inland 
Revenue (Class A). 

Inspector of Gas and 
Gas Meters. 

Asst. Inspector W.& M. 

Dep. Collect. (Class B) 

Deputy Collect. Inland 
Revenue (Class A). 

Unclassified Exciseman 

Deputy Collect. Inland 
Revenue (Class B). 

Deputy Collect.'Inland 
Revenue (Class B). 



Chief Insp. of Hides... 

Collector Inland Rev. 

3rd Class Exciseman., 

Ist Class Exciseman ., 
Food Inspector. 



Simpson, Arthur Fisher 

Sherbrooke, P.Q 



Simpson, William Andrew 



Sinon, Eugene Henry , 

Brantford, Out 

Slattery, Ralph , 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Slattery, Thomas 

Belleville, Ont. 

Sloan, William 

Brantford, Ont. 

Smith, John Chalmers 

Orillia. 

Snowden, Jas. W 

Montreal. 

Sparling, Jas. W 

Portage la Prairie. 

Spence, Francis Henry 

Guelph, Ont. 

Spereman, James Joseph .... 

London, Ont. 

Standish, Joseph Gera-d 

Belleville. 

Stevens, Daniel Bowen 

Trail, B.C. 

Stewart, James 

London, Ont. 

Stratton, William Cox f 

Toronto. \ 

Swannell, Frederick Wm,... 

Nelson, B C. 



TDeputy Collector In 
\ land Rev. (Class B) 

(Gas Inspector 

'Collector Inland Re 
venue. 

, Inspector of Gas , 

[ do Elect. Light 
Prob'y 3rd Class Ex 

ciseman. 
Collector Inland Re- 
venue. 
1st Class Exciseman ... 

Asst. Inspector W.& M 
and Mechanical Asst. 

Dep. Collector Inland 
Revenue (Class A). 

Asst. Inspector W.& M. 

2nd Class Exciseman... 

Dep. Collector Inland 

Revenue (Class B). 
1st Class Exciseman ... 

Special CI. Exciseman. 

do 

Dep. Collector Inland 

Revenue (Class B). 
Ist Class Exciseman ... 



Date. 



29 Jan. '01 

29 Jan. '01 

1 June '87 
1 Apr. '96 
1 Dec. '73 

1 July '72 

2 May '98 

26 Apr. '97 

12 July '97 

19 Jan. '01 

1 July '97 

i July '98 
1 Aug. '95 
1 July '97 

1 July '97 

8 Dec. '85 

9 July '90 
18 Jan. '85 

1 Oct '92) 

27 May '96 j 
25 Mar. '01 

1 Sept. '00 

1 Jan. '88 

20 May '84 
1 Sept. '00 

22 Dec. '98 
1 July '01 

28 Dec. '98 
1 July '85 
1 Nov. '80 
1 Jan. '91 

U May '98 
1 Jan. '87 



Present 
Salary. 



Dist. Insp. Inland Rev. 
Insp. Bonded Factories 
Dep. Collector Inland|27 June 
Revenue (Class B). I 



1 Jan. '00 I 



$ cts. 
800 001 

150 00 j" 

600 00 1 
100 00 J 
1,500 00 

750 00 

600 00 

400 00 

1,500 00 

1,000 00 

750 00 

977 50) 

200 00 I 

735 00 

1,000 00 

1,100 00 

100 00 
1,600 001 

150 00 I 
500 00 

1,452 50 

1,000 00 

700 00 

1,141 25 

600 00 

750 00 

850 00 

1,000 00 

1,600 00 

1,500 00 

400 00 

1,000 00 

2,400 00 
800 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



19 July '33 

22 Jan. '59 
6 Apr. '24 

2 Nov. '28 

28 Feb. '64 

— April "64 

13 Nov. '42 
27 May '61 
12 July '40 

27 June '69 
12 Nov. '73 

6 Sept. '57 

2 Nov. '49 

31 July '48 

22 Oct. '70 
5 May '63 

3 Feb. '42 
20 June '38 

28 July '53 

30 Apr. '48 

27 Aug. '66 
8 Nov. '51 

28 May '63 
28 May '54 
25 Jan. '49 

23 Nov. '56 
10 June '48 

31 July '46 
15 May '65 



29 Jan. '01 

1 June '87 

1 July '70 

6 Dec. '67 

2 May '98 
26 Apr. '97 

12 July '97 

26 June '00 
1 July '93 

14 Nov. '89 
1 June '96 

1 Aug. '82 

8 Dec. '85 

18 June '85 

9 Jan. '99 
14 Feb. '87 
16 Apr. '83 
28 May '84 

1 Sept. '00 
22 Dec. '98 

27 Dec. '97 

28 Dec. '98 
1 Jan. '83 

6 Apr. '78 
18 Jan. '83 

4 May '98 

7 May '83 

11 Feb. '71 
27 June '98 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



47 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF INLAND REVENUE— OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Present Rank. 



St-Michel, Frs.-Xavier 

St. Jerome. 

Talbot, John 

London. 

Taylor, George Wilson 

Joliette. 

Tetreau, Joseph 

St. Hyacinthe. 

Thomas, Joseph Smith | 

London, Ont. | 

Thomas, Philip 

Calgary. 

Thomas, Robert 

Windsor, Ont. 

Thorburn, James 

Vancouver, B.C. 

Till, Thomas Mercer 

Guelph, Ont. 

Timmons, Patrick 

Quebee. 

Tomlinson, Walter Morecroft 

Montreal. 

Tompkins, Patrick 

Halifax, N.S. 

Toupin, Fran^ois-X. J. A.... 

Montreal. 

Tracey, John Philip 

London, 

Tyrrell, Margaret 

Ottawa. 

Verner, Franc^ois 

Montreal. 

Verner, Thos. H 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Villeneuve, Jacques 

Montreal. 

Wainwright, Frederick G... 

Halifax. 

Waller, John 

Stratford. 

Walsh, Daniel Joseph 

Brantford. 

Wardell, Reginald Stuart R. 

Hamilton. 

Watson, James 

Ottawa. 

Watson, William Wallace... 

Winnipeg. 

Waugh, Richard Joseph 

Halifax, N.S 

Webbe,CecilEphraimAith'ir 

London, Ont. 

Weir, James 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Weyms, Charles 

Brantford. 

Wheatley, Alfred Edward... 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Whelan, William Frederick. 

Quebec. 

Whitehead, James Prescott.. 

Strathroy, Ont. 

TiOnHon , Ont 



Deputy Collect'r (Class 

B). 
3rd Class Exciseman... 

Special CI. Exciseman. 

Deputy Collect'r (Class 

B). 
Mechanical Assistant "I 
Inspector W. & M.... j 

{Acting Collector In- 
land Revenue. 
Inspector W. & M 

1st Class Exciseman.. 



Prob'y 3rd Class Exci- 19 
seman 

Deputy Collector Inl'd 1 

Revenue (Class A)... 
3rd Class Exciseman... 13 



Date. 



Asst. Inspector W.&M, 

3rd Class Exciseman.., 

Deputy Collector Inl'd 
Revenue (Class A). 
2nd Class Exciseman. 



Asst. Analyst 

2nd Class Exciseman.. 

1st do 

1st do 

2nd do 

3rd do 

Special do 

1st do 



I Laboratory Clerk 

(Food Inspector 

Deputy Collector Inl'd 
Revenue (Class A). 

I Inspector W. & M 

( do Food 

2nd Class Exciseman... 



1st do 

1st do 

Asst.Inspector W.& M. 
Specification Clerk 



'Deputy Collector Inl'd 
I Revenue (Class B). 



Apr. '97 
Apr. '98 
Sept. '93 
Jan. '00 

Feb. '88 
Dec. '98 

Dec. '98 
July '98 

Feb. '01 

July '87 

Oct. '98 

Aug. '89 

Dec. '83 

July '97 

July '97 

July '98 

Jan. '91 

Jan. '00 



Present 
Salarv. 



Feb. 


'92 


Jan. 


'87 


Nov. 


'89 


July 


'95 


July 


'98 


July 
Sept. 
April 


'89 
'90 
'98 


Feb. 
Feb. 
July 


'97 
'97 
'93 


July 


'97 


Jan. 


'88 


Feb. 


'91 


July 


'89 


May 


'98 



$ cts. 
500 00 

690 00 

1,400 00 
100 00 

800 00 
1,100 00 

2(.0 00 
977 50 

500 00 

1,430 00 
682 50 
700 00 
750 00 

1,500 00 
850 00 
600 00 
850 00 
913 75 

1,000 00 
850 00 
750 CO 

1,200 00 

977 50 

1,000 00) 
200 00 \ 
1,430 00 

600 00) 

300 00 j 

850 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

750 00 

750 00 

650 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



10 Apr. 


'51 


8 Feb. 


'63 


23 June 


'66 


5 Sept. 


'83 


11 June 


'38 


27 June 


'41 


29 May 


'67 


18 May 


'47 


1 Nov. 


'56 


2 Dec. 


'56 


12 Dec. 


'46 


29 Nov. 


'47 


19 Jan. 


'40 


26 Apr. 


'69 


7 July 


'44 


15 Sept. 


'62 


30 Jan. 


'38 


1 Aug 


'40 


25 Oct. 


'65 


10 Nov. 


'65 


9 June 


'74 


5 Apr. 


'41 


7 Jan. 


'44 


3 Jan. 


'69 


19 Mar. 


'67 


5 Aug. 


'63 


4 Mar. 


'42 


29 Sept. 


'67 


17 May 


'32 


30 May 


'53 



28 Dec. '96 

25 Oct. '97 

3 Dec. '88 

17 Jan. '00 

! 1 Feb. '88 

I 1 Apr. '86 
I 

17 Dec. '98 
25 Jan. '91 

8 Feb. '00 
1 July '85 

16 Mar. '92 
1 Aug. '89 

14 Aug. '79 

24 Oct. '83 
3 Aug. '92 

27 July '98 
I July '89 
7 May '97 

— Oct. '68 
21 Nov. '73 

18 June '88 
1 July '87 
1 June '94 

— Jan. '88 
1 Apr. '98 

13 Feb. '97 
1 Aug. '91 

1 Jan. '89 

5 Feb. '72 

II Feb. '91 
26 May '74 

9 May '98 



48 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VI r., A. 1902 
DEPARTEMENT OF INLAND REVENUE OUTSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 
Birth. 



White, J. B 

Prescott, Ont. 

Wilmot, John Bentley 

St. John, N.B. 

Wilson, David 

London, Ont. 

Wilson, John E 

St. John, N.B. 

Winsor, John 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Wood, James A 

Prescott, Ont. 

Woodward, George W 

Guelph, Ont. 

Wolfenden, William 

Vancouver, B.C. 
do New Westminster 

Wright, Robert J 

Toronto. 

Wright, Sarah E 

Ottawa. 

Young, Robert Edgar 

Listowel, Ont. 



Deputy Collector Inl'd 

Revenue (Class B). 
Inspector W. & M 



Assistant Accountant. 

Inspector of Gas, Gas 

Meters & El. Light... 

Asst. Inspector W.& M. 

Deputy Collector Inl'd 
Revenue (Class B). 

Special Class Excise- 
man. 

Deputy Collector Inl'd 
Revenue (Class B). 

Inspector of Gas 

Asst. Inspector W. & M. 

Clerk in Laboratory ... 

Deputy Collector Inl'd 
Revenue (Class B). 



July '00 

Aug. 'T9 

July '97 

April '00 

May '98 

May '96 

Jan. '83 

Oct. '91 

Dec. '93 
Jan. '81 i 

I 
July '00 j 

June '01 



$ cts. 
500 00 

1,200 00 

1,000 00 

1,050 00 

700 00 

800 00 

1,200 00 

700 001 

100 00 J 
800 00 

600 00 

500 00 



13 Dec. '70 

9 Feb. '42 

8 Mar. '40 

25 Aug. '52 

28 Aug. '51 

7 Oct. '48 
22 Apr. '40 

8 Aug. '43 
24 Dec. '51 

5 Nov. '71 
27 June '69 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



28 July '00 
14 Aug. '79 

1 Aug. '73 
26 Apr. '00 
30 Mar. '97 

1 May '9e 
11 July '7& 

3 Oct. '91 
1 Jan. '81 

13 June '01 



CIVIL SERVIGE LIST 



i9 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS—INSIDE SERVICE. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



McDougald, John 

Bennet, Frederick George... 

Farrow, Robinson Russell.... 

Bleakney, Arthur Crawley... 

McKiel, Charles Edward 

Fawcett, Guilford Heber 

Code, Thomas James 

Sanders, Edwin Lewis 

Morin, Alfred 

Bain, John 

Bliss, Thos. Alder Dickson. 

Russell, William 

Ackers, John 

Courtney, John 

Campbell, James Joseph 

Dunlevie, Sidney Alfred 

Christie, Jessie Blackburn... 

Bristol, John R. Ketcheson.. 

Grafton, William Henry 

Roper, Sydney C. D 

Frost, Samuel L. Tilley 

Watson, John Archibald 

Rorke, Herbert Victor 

Lafontaine, Adelard Marie 

Lesi^ge 
Berube, Pierre Arthur 

Moir, R. Huntington 

Slater, Firmus James 

Prentiss, George 

Carri^re, Albert 

Bales, Wm. Daniel Pye 



Present Rank. 



Commissioner. 
Chief Clerk 



Chief Clerk and Ac- 
countant. 
1st Class Clerk , 



do 
do 



1st Class Clerk and 

Asst. Accountant. 
1st Class Clerk 



do 



[ do 

I Private Secretary. 
1st Class Clerk 



2nd Class Clerk 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Junior 2nd Class Clerk 
do do 

2nd Class Clerk 

Junior 2nd Class Clerk 

do do 

do do 

Messenger 



Date. 



IMay 

1 July 

IJuly 

1 July 

1 Sept. 

1 July 

1 July 

1 July 

IJuly 

IJuly 
3 Aug 
IJuly 

IJuly 

1 Sept. 

1 Sept. 

IJuly 

IJuly 

IJuly 

13 Jan. 
IJuly 
IJuly 
1 July , 
IJuly 
1 July 
1 July 

27 June 

31 Dec. 
IJuly 
IJuly 
1 July 

12 Apr. 



'96 

'99 

'01 

'89 

'90 

'89 

'97 

'97 

'97 

'00 
'96 
'01 

'89 

'91 

'91 

'89 

'92 

'93 

'96 

'97 

'98 

'01 

'01 

'01 

'95 

'98 

'95 

'01 

'01 

'01 

'90 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts 
2,800 00 

1,850 00 

1,800 00 

1,800 00 

1,700 00 

1,750 00 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 

1,700 00 

1,450 00 ) 
400 00 \ 
1,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,350 00 

1,400 00 

1,250 00 

1,350 00 

1,350 00 

1,200 00 

1,150 00 

1,150 00 

1,100 00 

1,100 00 

1,100 00 

850 00 

750 00 

650 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

560 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



13 Mar. '48 
10 Mar. '62 

7 Mar. '63 

12 Aug. '53 

24 Apr. '46 

13 Nov. '50 
29 Jan. '64 

17 Mar. '56 
10 Jan. '57 

8 June '69 
28 June '57 

28 May '44 
16 July '46 
27 June '48 

10 July '51 
4 June '47 

26 June '61 

23 Sept. '68 

29 Nov. '50 

30 June '49 
30 July '57 

6 Dec. '66 

25 Apr. '69 
30 Mar. '56 
12 July '68 

18 Aug. '73 

11 Mar. '73 
20 Oct. '77 

24 Apr. '76 

27 Dec. '66 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



IMay '96 

24 Aug. '71 

15 Jan. '81 

1 Sept. '72 

I Dec. ' 74 

6 Feb. '73 
1 Apr. '82 
1 Aug. '82 

15 June '76 

3 Aug. '96 
23 May '82 

1 June '76 

IFeb. '79 

7 Feb. '82 
12 Apr. '70 

4 June '80 
1 May '84 

27 Nov. '89 

1 Jan. '85 

18 Dec. '86 

1 Nov. '90 

10 Dec. '91 

15 May '91 

15 May '91 

27 June '98 

26 Mar. '94 

1 July '01 

1 July '01 

1 July '01 

12 Apr. '90 



30—4 



;50 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE— ONTARIO. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Province of Ontario. 
Amherstburg. 

Barrett, Marwood 

Luckham, Daniel R 

Gatfield, John S. 
Brien, James. 



Anderdon, 



Essex Centre.. 

AUworthj Edward 

Kingsrille.. 

Ooulson, William C 

Leamington.. 

Atkinson, J. H. C 

West Dock, Pelee Island.. 



Belleville. 

Webster, William 

Hambly, Philip Hail.. 
Williamson, William. 
McGinnis, Arthur 



Daly, James A 

Campbellford.. 



Berlin. 
Colquhoun, Frederick... 

Landreth, J. H 

Dunn, John 

Bowman ville. 

Beith, James 

Brittain, Joseph 

Brantford. 

Foster, Thomas 

Heath, Edwin Lee 

Ryan, John 

Brockville. 
Jones, Wm. Hamilton... 

Stewart, Alexander 

^tayner, Thomas Allan. 



Present Rank. 



Collector 

Clerk & LandingWaiter 

Preventive Officer 

Sub-Collector 

do 

do 

do 



Collector 

Preventive Officer, 
do 

Clerk 

Sub-Collector 



Date. 



IJuly 
7 July 

17 Aug. 

4 Mar. 
1 Jan. 
1 July 
1 Apr. 

18 Oct. 
1 July 
1 Jan. 

5 Oct. 
1 Jan. 



Collector j 1 Jan. 

Clerk and Ldg. Waiter 1 Mar. 



Preventive Officer., 



Collector 

Landing Waiter. 



Collector 

Sub-Collector 
Clerk 



; Collector. 



Landing Waiter., 
Tide Waiter 



1 Aug. 



5 Apr. 


1 Apr, 


iMay 


1 Sept 


1 Apr. 


IMar. 


24 Jan. 


iJuly 



• 


Present 
Salary. 




% cts. 


'00 


1,000 00 


'98 


500 00 


'99 


200 00 


'97 


600 00 


'96 


450 00 


'01 


450 00 


'97 


500 00 


'78 


1,400 00 


'87 


600 00 


'00 


600 00 


'94 


1,000 00 


'00 


400 00 


'97 


1,300 00 


'99 


800 00 


'99 


700 00 


'97 


1,000 00 


'87 


500 00 


'99 


1,500 00 


'79 


800 00 


'00 


700 00 


'88 


1,300 00 


'50 


800 00 


'85 


600 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



24 Feb. '42 

12 Oct. '63 
22 Feb. '77 

4 Feb. '48 
26 Nov. '37 

8 Sept. '49 
31 Aug. '54 

4 Dec. '44 

20 Oct. '35 

4 Feb. '53 

25 Dec. '52 
25 Oct. '61 

31 Aug. '39 
25 Oct. '66 

16 Sept. '45 

10 Apr. '37 

4 Dec. '39 

7 Dec. '39 

9 Jan. '39 
20 Aug. '52 

17 Feb. '37 

5 Jan. '29 

13 Aug. '53 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 July '00 
13 July '97 

17 Aug. '99 
4 Mar. '97 
1 Jan. '96 
1 July '01 
1 Apr. '97 

18 Oct. '78 
IJuly '87 
1 Jan. '00 
9 Feb. '92 
1 Jan. '00 



1 Jan. '97 
1 Mar. '99 
1 Aug. '99 

5 Apr. '97 
1 Apr. '87 

27 Oct. '76 
iSept. '79 
lApr. '00 

1 Mar. '88 

24 Jan. '50 

1 July '85 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMElfT OP CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE— ONTARIO. 



51 



Name and P.O. Address. 



Chatham. 

Farquharson, Donald R 

Pilkey, Albert Edwardl 

Hay, Morice Gilmour 

Ridgetown. 

Hall, William E 

Rondeau & Blenheim 

Cobourg. 

Jones, Geo. F 

Hagerman, John G 

Morrow, John 

Colborne 
Johnston, James H 

Grafton. 

Collin gwood. 

Watson, George 

Cameron, Alex. McKinnon.. 
Meaford. 

Cornwall. 

Bergin, John 

Cline, JohnH 

Cook, Durham 

Aultsville. 

Deseronto. 
Valleau, Alex. S 

Fort Erie. 

Lawson, James 

Scholfield, Thomas 

Lewis, Charles Wesley. ...... 

Newbigging, Thomas Leslie. 
Pattison, Frank Thorborn... 

House, William Taylor 

Wilkins, Oscar Fitzalwyn... 

Riselay, Egerton Elliott 

Willson, William F 

Fort William. 
Perry, F. C 

30=4| 



Present Bank. 



Collector 

Preventive Officer.... 

Sub-Collector 

do 

Collector 

Preventive Officer.... 

Sub-Collector 

do 

Collector 

Sub-Collector 

Collector 

Preventive Officer.... 
Landing Waiter 

Collector 

Collector 

Preventive Officer.... 
Clerk and Land .Waiter 

do 

do 

Land. Waiter and Clerk 

do do 

Preventive Officer 

Tide Waiter 

Collector 



Date. 



June '01 
Nov. '98 
Apr. '00 
May '01 

July '98 
Feb. '92 
Apr. '00 
Nov. '96 



Nov. '66 

Nov. '88 



Mar. '96 
Sept. '94 
Oct. '78 



U Dec. '96 



Jan. '96 

June '90 
Dec. '75 
Feb. '74 
Feb. '99 
June '87 
Sept. '84 
Aug. '99 
Oct. '00 



1 Dec. '00 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 

1.300 00 
700 00 
700 00 
300 00 

1,100 00 
650 00 
550 00 
300 00 



1,000 00 
600 00 



1,200 00 
550 00 
350 00 

800 00 

1,400 00 
600 00 
700 00 
700 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



2 July '46 

2 July '60 

18 July '58 

10 Sept. '60 

17 Oct. '55 
^8 July '39 

10 Oct. '60 
21 May '69 

2 Dec. '28 

11 Sept. '56 

15 July '29 
20 July '64 

1 Nov. '38 

31 Aug. '48 

6 Jan. '40 

23 June '46 
9 Oct. '47 

13 June '42 

6 Mar. '72 
28 Mar. '42 

2 July '36 

7 July '60 

24 June '65 



900 00 1 May '52 1 Dec. '00 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 June '01 

16 Nov. '98 

1 Apr. '00 

1 May '01 

1 July '98 

1 Feb. '92 

1 Apr. '00 

14 Nov. '96 

22 Nov. '66 
1 Nov. '88 

5 Mar. '96 
11 Sept. '94 
16 Oct. '78 

14 Dec. '96 

1 Jan. '96 
1 June '90 
1 Dec. '75 
27 Feb. '74 
1 Feb. '99 
1 June '87 
1 Sept. '84 
1 Aug. '99 
1 Oct. '00 



SECRETARY OP J^TATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPAfeTMBKT OF OUSTOMS-^OUtiSIDE SERYlCE^-ONtARIO. 



Name and P.O. Address. 



Present Bank, 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 

Birth. 



Date of 

First Ap- 
pointment. 



Gait. 

Peck, Thomas 

Dennis, William Alfred 
Bowman, Allan. 



Collector 

Preventive Officer. 
Sub-Collector 



Preston, 
Gananoque. 

Britton, Wm. Henry 

Dixon, William. 



Collector 

Sub-Collector. 



Rockport. 



Goderich. 
Farrow, Asher 



McPherson, Malcolm J..,., 

Kincardine. 

Davis, Henry 

Wingham 

Neelin, Fred. G 

Seaforth 

Smith, George E 

Southampton. 

Wiseman, John 

Clinton. 



Guelph. 
Harlett, Jeremiah. 

Costello, John , 

Strachan, John.... 



Collector 

Sub-Collector. 

do 

do 

do 

do 



McNamara, Michael 

Walker ton. 

Hamilton. 

Kilvert, Francis Edwin i 

Mackenzie, Alexander Innes 

Thomson, John 

Gayfer, Harry 

Murray, Hugh 

Alexander, Andrew 

Park, Robert Hood 

Cape, John 

Colvin, Robert 

Battle, John 



Collector. 

Landing Waiter. 

do 
Sub-Collector .... 



1 Nov. '86 

6 June '87 

13 June '99 

18 Dec. '97 
6 June '87 

1 July '84 
1 Apr. ' 97 
1 Oct. '82 
1 Aug. '94 

12 July '95 
1 Mar. '00 

13 Jan. '96 
1 Nov. '73 
1 July '01 
1 Oot. '80 



Collector 

Surveyor 

Dominion Appraiset 

Appraiser 

Clerk 

do 

do 

do 

Clerk and Land.Waiter 
Clerk V, 



1 Feb. '87 

25 Oct. '76 

16 May '96 

13 July '97 

1 Nov. '83 

1 June '84 

1 June '87 

1 Dec. '81 

12 Apr. '90 

13 July '74 



$ cts. 

1,000 00 
600 00 
250 00 



1,000 00 
500 00 



1,000 00 
600 00 
600 00 
500 00 
400 00 
600 00 

1,300 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 

3,000 00 

1,500 00 

1,600 00 

1,200 00 

1,300 00 

900 00 

800 00 

1,200 00 

600 00 

850 00 



14 Oct. '56 
14 Feb. '53 
U Mar. '41 



16 July '50 
14 Feb. '38 



17 Apr. '40 
16 Dec. '65 
4 June '43 
8 May '53 
25 Aug. '50 
19 Nov. '50 

7 Dec. '43 

25 Dec. '40 

28 Jan. '69 
7 Mar. '41 

27 Dec. '38 

6 Feb. '26 

— June '35 

14 June '39 

26 June '43 

29 July '32 
25 Jan. '34 

30 Dec. '41 
5 July '70 

31 Jan. '57 



1 Nov. '86 

6 June '87 

13 June '99 

18 Dec. '97 
6 June '87 

1 June '84 
1 Apr. '97 
1 Oct. '82 
1 Aug.'94 

12 July '95 
1 Mar. '00 

13 Jan. '96 
1 Nov. ' 73 
1 July '01 
1 Oct. '80 

1 Feb. '87 

1 Apr. '76 

1 Mar. '73 

13 July '97 

1 Nov. '83 

1 June '84 

1 June '87 

— Aug. '76 

12 Apr. '90 

23 July '74 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE-^-ONTARIO. 



58 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Hamilton — Concluded. 

Peebles, Wm 

McCallum, Thomas 

Gibson, David Richie 

McCandlish, A 

Burns, John 

Scott, William J 

O'Dell, Alexander 

Halcrow, James 

McCuUy, George A 

Cleary, Stephen 

Gates, Joseph 

Ferguson, Alexander 

McKechnie, M. R 

Dundas. 

Moblo, John 

Dunnville. 

Felan, Maurice 

Oakville. 

Allen, James 

Burlington. 

Port Hope. 
Burton, Edmund John W.... 
Bletcher, Wm. Samuel 

Ingersoll. 

Williams, James F 

Lynch, John J 

Kingston. 

Hamilton, Clarke 

Anglin, Robert D 

Neish, William 

Gaskin, Thomas 

Driver, Thomas 

Comer, George Wm. Henry.. 

Hanley, James 

Geoghegan, John 



Present Rank. 



Clerk&Landing Waiter 
do 
do 

Clerk , 

do 

do 

Landing Waiter 

do 

Locker 

Preventive Officer.... 
do 

Messenger 

Sub-Collector 

do 

do 

do 



Collector 

Preventive Officer. 



Collector 

Preventive Officer. 



Collector 

Clerk 

Acting Surveyor 

Clerk 

Appraiser 

Tide. Waiter 

do 

do 



Date 



1 Feb. 

1 Feb. 

1 Feb. 

1 Mar. 

1 Mar. 

1 July 
16 M*y 
14 Feb. 

7 May 

1 Sept. 

1 Mar. 

1 May 
10 Jan. 
23 June 
13 July 

1 Aug 



'99 
'99 
'99 
'95 
'95 
'00 
'96 
'98 
'00 
'89 
'99 
'80 
'96 
'93 
'94 
'99 



15 Sept. '72 
17 Aug. '99 

1 Aug. '99 
1 Aug. '99 

29 June '82 
1 Mar '88 

16 Sept. '98 
1 July '90 

23 June '75 
1 Apr. '92 

27 Nov. '89 
4 May '93 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 
700 00 
600 00 
650 00 
600 00 
600 00 
400 00 
450 00 
800 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
450 00 
1,200 00 
800 00 
450 00 
300 00 



1,200 00 

700 00 

900 00 
650 00 

1,800 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 



Date of I ^^"^^^^ 
Birth. First Ap- 

pointment. 



28 Oct. '54 

1 Feb. '52 

2 Oct. '53 

24 May '60 

2 Jan. '55 
16 Apr. '77 

3 Mar. '68 
9 Jan. '39 

18 July '51 
— Dec. '33 
18 Sept. '38 
Nov. '46 

25 June '35 

4 Mar. '42 
30 Dec. '42 
22 Dec. '36 



1 Feb. '99 

1 Feb. '99 

1 Feb. '99 

1 Mar. '95 

1 Mar. '95 

1 July '00 

16 May '96 

1 June '74 

7 May '00 

6 May '74 

1 Mar. '99 

1 May '80 

10 Jan. '96 

23 June '93 

13 July '94 

1 Aug. '99 



5 Jan. '48 15 Sept. '73 
12 July '53 |17 Aug. '99 



17 Feb. '48 
12 May '66 

17 Mar. '33 
8 Dec, '38 

18 Jan. '34 
27 Mar. '50 



1 Aug. '99 
1 Aug. '99 

29 June '82 

23 Feb. '73 

23 July '77 

1 June '85 



1,200 00 15 Aug. '42 123 June '75 



550 00 21 Oct. '40 



550 00 
500 00 



8 Feb. '43 
23 Jan. '50 



1 Apr. '91 

27 Nov. '89 

4 May '93 



54 



SEGRBTARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE— ONTARIO. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Kingston — Concluded. 

Quigley, Joseph 

Graves, Wm. Daws 



Hogan, Thomas 

Wolfe Island 
Joslin, Almon 

Port Metcalf. 

Rankin, David J 

Collins Bay. 
Hitchens, Henry 



Home, Wm. E. 



Wolfe Island 



Carson, Robert . 
Rouse, David T. 



Bath, 

Lindsay. 
Lownsborough, William 

London. 

Burns, George 

Talbot, Oscar Henry 

Ferguson, John 

Sharp, Archibald 

Brett, William 

Stephenson, John 

McLean, Hugh Allen 

Johnston, Richard 

McCann, Bernard C 

Lewis, Philip C 

Southcott, Samuel J 

Wiley, David 

Orr, Robinson John 

McFadden, John 

Brady, John C 

Boyle, Patrick F 

Murray, W. H 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Preventive Officer. 

Tide Waiter 

Preventive Officer. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Messenger 

Sub-Collector 



Strathroy 
Midland. 
Parkhill, William James.... 



Collector, 



Collector 

Acting Surveyor 

Appraiser 

do 

Packer 

Cashier 

Preventive Officer 

Clerk 

Clerk&Landing Waiter 
do 
do 

Clerk 

Packer and Messenger.. 
Landing Waiter 

do 

do 

Sub-Collector 



Apr. '88 
May '92 
Apr. '93 
May '85 
Mar. '82 
Aug' '94 
Oct. '94 
Nov. '95 
Oct. '98 



Present 
Salary. 



1 July '98 



Collector., 



May '00 
July '97 
June '98 
June '98 
Jan. '88 
July '98 
May '91 
Jan. '99 
Feb. '99 
Feb. '9S 
Jan. '00 
Apr. '01 
Aug. '89 
Aug. '92 
Mar. '94 
June '95 
Oct. '98 



1 Mar. '89 



$ cts. 
550 00 
550 00 
500 00 
150 00 
150 00 
550 00 
200 00 
500 00 
400 00 

900 00 

2,250 00 
1,100 00 
1,100 00 
1,100 00 
500 00 
900 00 
550 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 GO 
500 00 
650 00 
600 00 
500 00 
500 00 

800 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



29 Apr. '45 
16 July '48 
28 Feb. '47 
28 May '46 

30 Mar. '33 
24 Dec. '37 
14 Nov. '30 

'46 

20 Jan. '39 

23 Feb. '38 

28 July '42 

29 Dec. '60 
4 Aug. '48 

13 Dec. '41 
10 May '59 

24 Aug. '51 

6 Jan. '58 
2 May '65 

7 Dec. '58 

14 Feb. '66 
10 Sept. '59 



Date of 

First Ap- 
pointment. 



5 Sept. '64 

9 Nov. '71 

15 Mar. '43 

'47 

12 Aug. '36 

27 Dec. '40 



1 Apr. '88 

I Apr. '91 
10 Apr. '93 
16 May '85 

16 Mar. '82 
1 Aug. '94 
5 Oct. '94 
1 Nov. 95 

17 Oct. '98 

1 July '98 

7 May '90 

II May '88 
22 June '98 
22 June '98 

1 Jan. '88 
1 July '98 
1 May '91 
1 Jan. '99 
1 Feb. '99 
1 Feb. '99 
1 Jan. '00 
1 Apr. '01 
12 Aug. '89 
1 Aug. '92 
7 Mar. '94 
1 June '95 
1 Oct. '98 

1 Mar. '89 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



55 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE— ONTARIO. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Morrisburg. 

Laflamme, Andrew J 

Napanee. 

Anderson, Thos. E 

Perry, Charles Benjamin 

Niagara Falls. 

Boyle, Arthur 

Brown, Joseph Pell 

Cannon, John Henry 

Culhaiie, Patrick 

Bender, Hiram.. 

Flynn, James Joseph 

Bartle, John Clarence 

Parker, "William McMicking. 

Bampfield John Joseph 

House, William Henry 

Gray, Alexander 

Brown, James 

McKenzie, Charles James ... 

Robertson, Augustus R 

Nidle, Henry 

Wood, Fred. F 

Sando, John 

Niagara. 
Glasgow, Oliver D 

Queenston. 
Whitewell, Francis 

Queenston. 
Kimmitt, Richard 

Queenston. 
WoodruflF, David W 

Queenston. 

Oshawa. 

Blarney, Geo. Frederick 

Hall, Luther Calvin 

Ottawa. 

Russell, James Waddell 

Bartram, Joseph Thomas 



Present Rank. 



Collector. 



do 

Landing Waiter 



Collector 

Chief Clerk 

Landing Waiter 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Preventive Officer 

do 

do 

Clerk& LandingWaiter 
do 
do 
Landing Waiter 

do 

Sub-Collector 

Preventive Officer 

do 

do 

do 



Collector 

Preventive Officer. 



Collector . 
Surveyor ... 



Date. 



1 Aug. '97 

10 Dec. '96 
1 May '75 



May '96 
Apr. '87 
Nov. '69 
July '72 
Sept. '79 
Mar. '80 
Mar. '82 
Mar. '82 
Mar. '99 
July '86 
Apr. '99 
Oct. '84 
Oct. '84 
Dec. '91 
Mar. '88 
Apr. '93 
Aug. '95 
Jan. '97 
Apr. '00 
May '00 
Apr. '01 



1 Jan. '82 
1 July '00 

1 Feb. '98 

9 June '76 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 
Birth. 



% cts. 

800 00 26 Aug. '35 



800 00 
500 00 

1,600 00 
1,000 00 
650 00 
650 00 
750 00 
600 00 
700 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
750 00 
750 00 
600 00 
600 oO 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
700 00 
600 00 

800 00 
500 00 

2,000 00 
1,400 00 



9 Mar. '55 
16 Sept. '27 

13 Mar. '42 
10 Feb. '37 
16 Apr. '41 

'29 

16 Oct. '42 
31 Aug. '58 

21 Aug. '57 

30 June '51 

22 Mar. '65 
18 Sept. '57 
22 Sept. '47 
20 May '44 

22 Mar. '47 
3 Jan. '53 

24 Mar. '50 

23 July '62 
29 Sept. '46 

24 Dec. '60 

31 Aug. '62 

1 Feb. '51 
10 Jan. '49 

26 Nov. '33 

2 Feb. '33 

18 Mar. '41 
24 June '41 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 Aug. '97 

10 Dec. '96 
1 May '75 

1 May '96 
18 Dec. '65 

11 Nov. '69 

1 July '72 

2 Sept. '79 
— Mar. '80 
14 Mar. '82 
29 Mar. '82 

1 Mar. '99 

21 Oct. '85 

1 Apr. '99 

1 Oct. '84 

1 Oct. '84 

5 Dec. '91 

14 Mar. '88 

1 Apr. '93 

1 June '88 

14 Jan. '97 

10 Apr. '00 

7 May '00 

1 Apr. '01 

1 Jan. '82 
1 July '00 

1 Feb. '98 
1 Jan. '57 



56 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE— ONTARIO. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Ottawa — Concluded. 

Taylor, Alex. Harvey 

McGovern, John James 

Clark, Robert Alex 

Waggoner, Stephen Hooper. 

Lacerte, Alide 

Bishop, Wm. Gordon 

Champness, Weldon 

Spittal, Robert 

Hood, Tho3. Andrew 

Ryan, Patrick Eugene 

Lapointe, Frederick 

Routhier, Andr6M 

Russell, Robert 



Present Rank. 



Pembroke 

Wright, Orange 

Renfrew, 

Donald, Frank 

Carleton Place 

Neilson, Geo. Edward , 

Arnprior. 

Pollock, Wm. C 

Almonte 

McKenzie, Wm 

North Bay. 



Owen Sound. 
Horton, Nicholas Powell. 

Malone, Patrick , 

Caton, James 

Parry Sound. 

Fitzgerald, Jos. W 

Jordan, Robert 



Byng Inlet. 

Gillies, James Francis 

French River. 

Paris. 

Hall, Thomas 

Kinnear, Alexander Molgon 

Peterboro' . 

Hall, Robert 



Appraiser 

Preventive Officer... 

Clerk 

Clerk& Landing Waiter 

Clerk , 

do 

Preventive Officer... 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

Sub-Collector 

do 

do 

do 

•do 

do 

Collector 

Preventive Officer .. 
do 

Collector 

Preventive Officer- 
do 

Collector 

Landing Waiter 

Collector 



Date. 


Present 
Salary. 




% cts. 


13 July '97 


1,300 00 


1 Jan. '88 


800 00 


1 July '89 


1,000 00 


1 July '90 


850 00 


1 June '82 


1,000 00 


1 Feb. '00 


750 00 


22 May '89 


750 00 


1 Mar. '88 


800 00 


1 Apr. '92 


700 00 


1 Dec. '92 


800 00 


1 Mar. '00 


700 00 


20 Mar. '00 


700 00 


1 July '01 


700 00 


1 July '01 


500 00 


6 Dec. '86 


500 00 


17 Apr. '90 


400 00 


1 Aug. '99 


500 00 


1 Apr. '01 


400 00 


1 July '98 


1,000 00 


1 Aug. '99 


600 00 


1 Feb. '00 


600 00 


1 Apr. '01 


800 00 


1 Aug. '99 


300 00 


1 Nov. '99 


300 00 


1 Mar. '78 


1,000 00 


10 May '75 


600 00 


1 July '00 


1,200 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



9 Nov. '39 

4 Feb. '52 

25 July '68 

13 Mar. '59 

4 July '65 

19 Sept. '78 

3 Jan. '39 
18 Mar. '48 

13 Dec. '65 

4 Jan. '36 
'62 

30 Mar. '54 
22 Aug. '52 
29 May '52 
22 Mar. '43 
12 Mar. '34 

4 Aug. '65 

31 May '50 

14 Nov. '47 
12 Apr. '55 
31 July '42 

18 Jan. '47 

21 Dec. '33 

6 Sept. '62 

31 Jan. '35 
— Apr. '26 

17 Jan. '49 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



13 July '97 
1 Sept. '76 
1 July '89 
1 July '90 
1 June '82 
1 Feb. '00 

22 May '89 
1 Mar. '8P 
1 Dec. '87 
1 Dec. '92 
1 Mar. '00 

20 Mar. '00 
1 July '01 
1 July '01 
6 Dec. '86 

17 Apr. '90 
1 Aug. '99 
1 Apr. '01 



1 July '98 
1 Aug. '99 
1 Feb. '00 

1 Apr. '01 
1 Aug. '99 
1 Nov. '99 



1 Mar. '78 
10 May '75 

1 July '00 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



57 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE— ONTARIO. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Present 

Salary. 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



Picton. 

Ross, Walter T 

Prescott. 

Jessup, Edward 

Murphy, John 

Gerald, Asahel Scott 

Keeler, Robert M 

Melville, Thomas R 

Hollingsworth, Samnel 

Leahy, Hugh. 

Mooney, John 

Maitland. 

McMillan, Robert Pringle ... 

Cardinal. 

Port Arthur. 

Wiley, A. M 

Boyce, Thos. Riddell 

Marsh, R. J. F 

Fort Frances. 

Rat Portage. 

Barnes, George 

St. Catharines. 

Cuffe, John E 

Hodge, Archibald 

McClive, John 

Spillette, Silas William ...... 

Pattison, Thos. F 

Thorold. 
Sidey, Samuel James 

Port Colborne. 
Ramsden, John A 

Port Colborne. 
Clark, Wm. Beverly 

Port Dalhousie. 

Hill, John F 

Welland. 

St. Thomas. 

Darrach, Alex 

Finlay, James Thos. Clark.. 



Collector. 



Collector 

Landing Waiter 

Preventive OflBcer.... 
Clerk & Land' g Waiter 

Appraiser 

Preventive Officer..., 
do 

Sub-Collector 

do 



Collector 

Clerk 

Sub- Collector. 



Collector. 



Collector ., 

Clerk & Land'g Waiter 

Searcher. 
Sub-Collector. 



do 

do 

Preventive Officer. 

do 
Sub-Collector 



Collector 

Sub-Collector 



23 May '78 

1 Aug. '85 
1 July '74 
25 Jan. '62 
1 Apr. '92 
7 May '00 
1 July '83 
1 Aug. '99 

28 Mar. '76 
6 JAe '90 

1 Nov. '95 

14 May '89 
1 July '00 

1 July '98 

11 Nov. '92 
13 Mar. '76 

15 Mar. '76 

29 May '82 
1 Jan. '97 
1 July '98 

27 May '90 
1 Aug. '89 
4 Mar. '97 



1 Aug. '99 
28 Mar. '74 



$ cts. 
1,000 00 

1,200 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
900 00 
600 00 
600 00 
400 00 
800 00 



22 Jan. '47 

11 Jan. '32 
28 Mar. '45 
31 Aug. '40 

6 Oct. '55 
19 Dec. '47 

8 Dec. '32 
17 Jan. '44 

7 Oct. '24 

12 Mar. '43 



1,000 00 31 Oct. '64 
800 00 I I Feb. '64 
500 00 '53 



600 00 

1,000 00 
850 00 
800 00 
700 00 
800 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
500 00 



10 Sept. '54 



23 May '78 

1 Aug. '85 
1 July '74 

25 Jan. '62 
1 Aug. '91 
7 May '00 
1 July '83 
1 Aug. '99 

28 Mar. '76 
6 June '90 

1 Nov. '95 

14 May '89 

I July '00 

1 July '98 



4 Mar. '40 11 Nov. '92 
17 July '32 U. June '74 

5 Jan. '50 115 Mar. '76 



15 Jan. '37 
19 Sept. '56 



29 May '82 
1 Jan. '97 



4 Oct. '50 i 1 July 



26 Apr. '46 
2 Mar. '56 



21 May '90 
1 Aug. '89 



27 Jan. '50 i 4 Mar. '97 



1,200 00 |17 Jan. '57 
i 
800 00 i 7 Dec. '39 



1 Aug. '99 
28 Mar. '74 



58 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE— ONTARIO. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



St. Thomas — Concluded. 



Ogilvie, John Bedford 

Aylmer. 

Payne, Manuel, 

Port Stanley. 

Backhouse, William 

Burwell. 

Thompson, Thomas 

Port Bruce. 



Sarnia. 
Matheson, George Nair.. 
Adams, Joshua Fourth... 

McLagan, John 

Macvicar, Alfred Fisher. 
Alcock. James 



Lott, John McKenzie 

Courtright. 

Clark, 0. S 

Point Edward 

Dawson, Daniel 

Petrolia. 
Almas, A. A , 



Chester, John 

Mahouey, John C. 



Sault Ste. Marie. 

Plummer, Henry 

Ironside, James Symington.. 

Howe, A. W 

Stephen, John 



Present Rank. 



Sub-Collector 

do 

do 
Preventive Officer. 



Collector 

Landing Waiter ... 
do 
do 
Preventive Officer. 

Sub-Collector 

do 
do 
Preventive Officer., 
do 
do 



Collector 

Clerk & Land'g Waiter 
Preventive Officer.... 
do 



Prout, John W Sub-Collector 

Bruce Mines. 

English, Richard 

Little Current. 

Monck, Alfred 

Cockburn Island. 

McGuire, Gloss Crysler 

Algoma Mills. 

Smith, A. Hoffman 

Sudbury. 



Flesh Ir, Thos. 

Spanish River. 

Taylor, George H 

Michipicoten. 

Currie, Neil 

Thessalon. 



do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
Preventive Officer. 



Date. 



1 July '98 
I July '84 
5 July '81 
1 Apr. '70 



Jan. '56 

10 Aug. '74 

1 Aug. '79 

1 Feb. '87 

18 June '84 

1 July '98 

1 July '92 

16 Oct. '73 

1 Julv '95 

1 May '97 

1 Aug. '99 



Feb. '89 
Aug. '80 
Mar. '96 
Aug. '99 
May '92 
Apr. '71 
Nov. '92 
Jan. '92 
June '96 
Dec. '94 
Aug. '99 
Aug '99 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 
Birth. 



$ cts. 

450 00 
300 00 
300 00 
100 00 



1,800 00 
800 00 
600 00 
550 00 
600 00 
400 00 
700 00 
850 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 

1,300 00 
750 00 
600 00 
600 00 
400 00 
500 00 
300 00 
700 00 
600 00 
400 00 
600 00 
400 00 



8 May '62 
10 Fsb. '45 
— Mar. '39 
'20 



2 Dec. '35 

22 Apr. '40 
31 Oct. '41 
24 Aug. '68 
11 July '45 

5 Oct. '49 
17 Aug. '48 

16 Mar. '35 
10 Oct. '49 

1 May '40 
14 Oct. '66 

29 Dec. '51 
13 July '35 

24 May '51 
13 Apr. '67 
13 Dec. '67 

7 Feb. '34 

17 June '38 

23 May '62 
19 Nov. '63 
23 Aug. '46 
19 Jan '66 

25 Dec. '61 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 July '98 
1 July '84 
5 July '81 
5 Apr. '70 



26 Jan. '56 

10 Aug '74 

1 Aug. '79 

1 Feb. '87 

18 June '84 
1 July '98 
1 July '92 

16 Oct. '73 
29 June '95 

1 May '57 
1 Aug. '99 

1 Feb. '89 

31 Aug. '80 

31 Mar. '96 

1 Aug. '99 

1 May '92 

19 Apr. '71 
1 Nov. '92 
1 Jan. '92 
1 June '96 

26 Nov. '94 

17 Aug. '99 
17 Aug. '99 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OP CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE-ONTARIO. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Simcoe. 
Porter, Nathaniel. 
Law, Wm. S 



Davis, John R. 



Tilsonburg. 



Stewart, Geo. 



Port Dover. 



Present Rank. 



Port Rowan. 



Noble, John 

Stratford. 

Hess, John George 

MacGregor, Chas. John. 
Hutchison, Robert. 



Listowel. 
Tyson, Albert Monroe 

Wiarton. 
Cull, Dr. J. W 

Mitchell, 



Toronto. 

Small, John 

Douglas, John 

Fleming, John Beverley... 
Baxter, Charles Wesley... 
McCaffry, James Robert... 

Heakes, James Robert 

Cowan, John Arpen 

Ardagh, Henry Hatton 

Woods, Wm. Patrick 

Greer, James 

Thompson, John 

Tinning, William Karr S.. 

Walton, Robert F 

Reiddy, Charles , 

Harris, Samuel T. H 

Griffith, William 

Bovell, Howard , 

Beale, James 

Meredith, Wm. Edward... 
Somers, Frank, jr , 



Date. 



Collector 

Sub-Collector 

do 

do 

Tide Waiter 

Collector 

Clerk 

Sub-Collector 

do 

do 

Collector 

Surveyor 

Cashier 

Asst. C ashier 

Acting Chief Clerk 

Clerk 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Clerk & Land. Waiter 
Clerk and Tide Waiter, 
do 



1 Dec. '00 
IJan. '87 
1 Jan. '92 
1 Nov. '94 
20 Feb. '95 

6 Nov. '93 
9 Apr. '85 
IJuly '98 
25 Aug. '88 
1 Dec. '93 



10 Mar. 

1 Jan. 

1 Jan. 

1 Jan. 

1 Jan. 

IMay 

1 July 

6 Feb. 
21 June 

1 Jan. 

1 Jan. 

IMay 

IFeb. 

1 July 

1 June 

1 Sept. 

1 Apr. 
16 May 

1 Jan. 

IFeb. 



'91 
'58 
'91 
'91 
'96 
'78 
'78 
'83 
'86 
'96 
'96 
'82 
'89 
'83 
'89 
'81 
'84 
'96 
'96 
'91 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



$ cts. 
800 00 
600 00 
500 00 
250 00 
600 00 

1,200 00 
850 00 
700 00 
400 00 
400 00 



4,000 00 

2,250 00 

1,400 00 

1,100 00 

1,200 00 

900 00 

1,000 00 

850 00 

700 00 

800 00 

750 00 

750 00 

650 00 

750 00 

600 00 

750 00 

700 00 

600 00 

650 00 

700 00 



6 June '60 \ 1 Feb. '97 



21 Dec. '33 
24 Sept. '53 
21 Mar. '42 
'26 



8 Nov. '38 
19 Feb. '33 
22 Sept. '36 

8 Apr. '43 
18 Aug. '39 



8 Oct. 
19 Mar. 
22 Aug. 
19 Jan. 

6 Feb. 
11 July 
11 Oct. 
11 Sept. 
27 Aug. 

5 Oct. 
15 July 
29 Aug. 
29 Mar. 
22 July 

26 Apr. 

27 Mar. 
29 Mar. 
19 Oct. 
15 Oct. 

3 Aug. 



IJan. '87 

1 Jan. '92 

17 Oct. '94 

1 Dec. '93 

6 Nov. '93 

9 Apr. '85 

IJuly '98 
25 Aug. '88 

1 Dec. '93 



31 10 Mar. '91 



1 Jan. '58 

1 Dec. '72 

22 Oct. '73 

26 May '69 



'49 ! 1 May '78 
'50 I 1 July '78 



6 Feb. '83 
21 June '86 
'53 j IJuly '86 
'70 I 5 Dec. '88 
'62 1 May '82 



'46 
'40 
'60 
'27 
'40 
'60 
'50 
'68 



.1 Feb. '89 
IJuly '83 
1 June '89 
1 Sept. '81 
1 Apr. '84 
IJune '91 
IMar. '86 
IFeb. '91 



60 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII. 
DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVIOE— ONTARIO. 



A. 1902 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Present Rank. 



Toronto— Continued . 

Larkin, Joseph J 

Leatch, Charles C 

ColwelljFred 

Miller, Edward W 

Pearson, Wesley 

Patterson, Alexander, jr.. 

McCaw, Hugh 

Davidson, John James 

Sinclair, James 

Mitchell, Thos 

Ryan, James 

Westman, S. J 

Bertram, John Hugh 

Bell, Robert 

McKay, John 

Yorston, James 

Anderson, Bouchette 

Howe, William 

Loarden, Cornelius 

Scott, Andrew 

Mitchell, Thomas 

Black, David Nathaniel ... 

Plunkett, William 

Gray, Chas. L 

Fowler, Edwin 

Burns, William 

Lowther, John 

Pape, Oswald 

Hudson, John Wilkinson.... 

O'Farrall, Robert 

Milburn, Robert Baldwin. 



Clerk 

do 

do 

Dominion Appraiser 

Asst. Appraiser 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Ganger 

Asst. Ganger 

Chief Locker 

Landing Waiter 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Tide Waiter 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Preventive Officer.... 



Date. 



1 Oct. '00 

1 July '01 

1 Jan. "00 

26 July '99 

iJan. '93 

1 July '89 

1 July '77 

1 Dec. '91 

13 July '97 

1 Jan. '96 

1 July '01 

31 Mar. '96 

1 June '01 

1 Apr. '83 

7 May '00 

1 Aug. '00 

1 Jan. '88 

17 Mar. '64 

IJan. '96 

1 Apr. '73 

1 May '78 

1 Sept. '83 

1 May '84 

1 Nov. '95 

22 Oct. '73 

22 Oct. '73 

22 Oct. '72 

16 May '96 

1 July .'98 

16 Sept. '98 

1 July '81 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts 

600 00 

600 00 

700 00 

1,600 00 

1,200 00 

1,200 00 

800 00 

1,600 00 

1,200 00 

750 00 

1,200 00 

1,200 00 

1,000 00 

1,200 00 

800 00 

1,000 00 

750 00 

750 00 

650 00 

800 00 

800 00 

650 00 

700 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

600 00 

700 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



17 Jan. '67 
1 Nov. ' 75 
9 Mar. '69 

25 May '57 

17 Feb. '51 

4 Aug. '57 
10 Dec. '32 
13 Sept. '43 

26 Nov. '54 

5 Sept. '54 
26 July '50 

1 Nov. '63 
10 Apr. '72 

8 June '32 
4 July '67 

12 July '44 
29 Dec. '47 

6 May '26 

21 Dec. '33 

12 Nov. '47 

22 Jan. '44 
iNov. '37 

1 July '52 

13 Mar. '68 

9 Oct. '34 

2 June '26 
22 May '35 

18 July '57 

14 Feb. '44 
13 Nov. '38 
22 Dec. '48 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 Oct. '00 

1 July '01 

1 Jan. '00 

13 July '97 

13 May '82 

1 July '82 

1 July '77 

1 Dec. '91 

13 July '97 

I Jan. '96 

1 July '01 

31 Mar. '96 

1 June '01 

1 Apr. '83 

7 May '00 

IJuly '77 

1 June '70 

17 Mar. '64 

16 May '72 

1 Apr. '73 

1 May '78 

1 Sept. '83 

1 May '84 

1 Nov. '95 

22 Oct. '73 

22 Oct. '73 

22 Oct. '72 

16 May '96 

1 July '81 

1 July '81 

1 July '81 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



61 



SESSIONAL PAF>ER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS-^OUTSIDB SERVICE— ONTARIO. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 

Toronto — Continued. 

Lloyd, Frank 

Loughrane, Lawrence 

Graham, Nicholas 



Sharp, Daniel M 



Port Credit. 



Wright, Robert 

Byers, Henry 

Byron, Geo. Edward 

Reid, William 

Trowbridge, John 

Dunlop, Wm. John 

Slean, John 

Giroux, Octave 

Davis, Thomas Jefferson. 
Rutland, Sinclair A 



William, Thomas 

Cook, Marshall Edwin.. 

Custaloe, Reuben 

McCuaig, Donald Alex. 

Clewlo, O.S 

Head, John 

Foy, Augustine , 

Oxley, William B 

Dickson, Wm. Henry.... 



Ellard, James H. 



Smith, Philip 

Gunn, Wm. Alex .... 

DriffiU, James 

McWhirter, Hugh..... 
McArthur, Frank F. 
Gillespie, John S 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 

Birth. 



16 May '96 
1 Jan. '95 
1 July '81 
1 May '85 
1 July '83 
7 May '00 
1 Sept. '00 
1 July '83 
1 July '83 
1 Feb. '89 
1 Mar. '86 

16 May '96 
1 June '87 

18 Oct. '89 

20 Aug. '90 
1 May '78 
1 Jan. '90 
1 Apr. '01 

16 May '96 
Preventive Officer jll Mar. '95 



Preventive Officer.... 

do 

Packer 

Preventive Officer 

Packer 

Preventive Officer 

do 

Packer 

do 

Packer and Messenger. 

do 

Preventive Officer 

Packer and Messenger. 

do 

Packer, Messenger and 

Porter. 
Messenger 



Packer and Porter. 

do 
Landing Waiter .... 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Packer. 



1 Mar. '99 
1 Feb. '96 
1 Jan. '00 
4 Jan. '00 
1 Mar. '00 
1 Mar. '00 
1 July '00 
1 Oct. '00 
1 July '00 
1 Apr. '01 
I Feb. '95 



$ cts. 
650 00 
650 00 
550 00 
250 00 
500 00 
550 00 
600 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
600 00 
550 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
550 00 
550 00 
800 00 
600 00 
700 00 
800 00 
600 00 
500 00 
700 00 
700 00 
500 00 
700 00 
500 00 



1 Dec. '62 
15 Sept. '44 

12 July '33 
26 June ' 31 

13 Mar. '58 
3 Mar. '56 

18 Apr. '76 
10 June '45 

29 July '52 

17 Mar. '62 

15 June '59 
23 Jan. '53 
21 July '64 

8 Jan. '41 
13 July '64 
10 Aug. '39 

10 Aug. '66 

25 Dec. '55 

11 May '47 

30 July '65 
5 Feb. '48 

2 July '58 
21 Aug. '40 

16 Dec. '49 

18 Aug. ' 70 
30 Nov. '47 

26 Dec. '52 
23 Aug. '42 
16 Nov. '61 

27 Aug. '42 
4 July '54 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 July '82 
25 Apr. '92 

I July '81 
1 May '85 
1 July '83 
1 July '83 
1 Sept. '00 
1 July '83 
1 July '83 
1 Feb. '89 
1 Mar. '86 

18 Apr. '87 
1 June '87 
18 Oct. '89 
20 Aug. '90 
1 May '78 
1 Jan. '90 
1 Apr. '01 
9 Feb. '92 

II Mar. '95 
1 Mar. '99 
1 Feb. '96 
1 Jan. '00 
4 Jan. '00 
1 Mar. '00 
1 Mar. '00 
1 July '00 
1 Oct. '01 
1 July '00 
1 Apr. 01 
1 Feb. '95 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 

DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE— ONTARIO. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Present Rank, 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



Toronto — Concluded 
Bro-wnlee, Alex- 
Manning, John J 



Barrie 

Brampton 

Graydon, Robert 

Streetsville. 

Gilchrist, Jno 

Orangeville, 

Lynch, Robert A 

Orillia 

Ross, Hugh Henry 

Penetanguishene 

Langan, John 

Georgetown 

Yule, Andrew 

Aurora and Newmarket 

Trenton. 

McGuire, Francis James 

Wallaceburg. 

Fraser, J. H 

Deming, Henry Vilender.. .. 

Whitby. 

Philp, James Rowe 

Taylor, Charles 

Windsor. 

Allen, Henry William 



Sub-Collector, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



C ollector. 



Collector 

Landing Waiter. 



Collector 

Landing Waiter 



Welsh, Walter., 



Hanrahan, Patrick 

Dronillard, Albert 

Bushell, Wm. Crampton. 
McKee, Thomas. 
Dench, Thos. 0. 
Barnett, John.... 



Sandwich 



Beers, Jamee M. R. 



Crampton, James 

Thompson, Marshall .. 

Turk, John 

Castanier, Louis Nap. 

Adam, Albert R 

McMurray, James 



Collector 

Preventive Officer 
Landing Waiter,... 

do 

do 
Preventive Officer. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



U Nov. '96 

4 Nov. '90 
1 July '88 

21 Jan. '93 
1 Apr. '00 
1 Nov. '98 
1 Aug. '99 
1 Apr. '01 

9 July '75 

14 Nov '96 

23 July '74 

1 Mar. '94 
1 Mar. '78 

11 Sept. '98 
9 June '96 

5 May '82 
19 Dec. '83 

1 June '86 

24 Sept. '80 
I Jan. '91 

21 Sept. '91 
1 Dec. '91 
1 Jan. '89 
5 Jan. '92 
9 June '97 

16 Sept. '96 
1 July '00 
1 Jan. '01 



$ cts. 
700 00 
550 00 
200 00 
500 00 
600 00 
500 00 
400 00 
400 00 

700 00 

700 00 
600 00 



26 June '52 
17 Aug. '52 

1 July '47 

2 Nov. '36 
21 Dec. '47 

7 June '38 
10 Aug. '41 
10 Oct. '39 

'25 

27 Apr. '56 

3 July '30 



600 00 23 Feb. '35 
600 00 28 Aug. '36 



1,800 00 
1,000 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
350 00 
600 00 
750 00 
700 00 
600 00 
650 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 



29 Dec. '43 

24 Feb. '44 
5 June '48 

12 May '51 
4 Mar. '57 

16 May '27 
4 July '45 

25 Nov. '44 

13 Sept. '50 
10 Dec. '39 
39 June '46 
13 May '44 
22 July '58 
13 June '65 



14 Nov. '96 

4 Nov. '90 
1 July '88 

21 Jan. '93 
1 Apr. '00 
1 Nov. '98 
1 Aug. '99 
1 Apr. '01 

9 July '75 

14 Nov. '96 
23 July '74 

1 Mar. '94 
1 Mar. '78 

ll Sept. '98 
9 June '97 

5 May '82 
19 Dec. '83 

1 June '86 

lA Sept. 80 

1 Jan. '91 

21 Sept. '91 

1 Dec. '91 

1 Jan. '89 

5 Jan. '92 

9 June '97 

16 Sept. '98 

1 July '00 

1 Jan. '01 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 



63 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE— QUEBEC. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Woodstock. 
Van Ingen, William Henry.. 
Banting, Charles 

Province of Quebec. 

Abercorn. 
Dunn, John 

Currie, Edgar Prentis 

Coaticook. 

Daly, John Baptist 

Churchill, James 

Durocher, Jean-Baptiste 

Island Pond. 
Williams, J 

Webster, Oscar H. E 

Adams, Geo. Edward 

Cookshire. 

Ross, Alexander 

Gendreau, A. Bagnes 

Lake Megantic. 
Graham, Donald 

Lake Megantic. 

Kingsbery, William 

Comins Mills. 
Cauchon, Alphonse 

Lake Megantic. 

Gaspe. 

Kavanagh, Arthur J 

McGie, Donald Barnabas.... 
Esquimaux Point 

Hemmingford. 

Proper, Frederick Serine..., 

Manning, Robert C 

Franklin Centre 

Saunders, Wm 

Athelstan 

Fiddes, Alex , 

Vicars 

Simpson, J. Patterson , 

Roxham 



Present Rank. 



Collector.... 

Land. Waiter & Clerk. 



Collector 

Preventive Officer , 

Collector 

Clerk & Land. Waiter 

Landing Waiter 

Preventive Officer , 

do 

do 

Collector 

Sub-Collector 

Preventive Officer , 

Aictg. Sub-Collector... 
Preventive Officer 

Collector 

Sub-Collector 

Collector 

Sub-Collector , 

do 

Preventive Officer 

do 



Date. 



22 Nov. '66 
1 July '84 



1 July '85 
1 July '85 

20 Aug. '90 

1 Aug. '83 

12 July '83 

1 Jan. '94 

10 July '99 

1 Nov. '00 

1 Jan. '91 
1 Jan. '88 
1 May '92 
1 Apr. '82 
1 Aug. '99 

19 June '94 
5 May '71 

1 Jan. '77 
1 July '98 
1 May '91 
1 May '89 
4 Mar. '97 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 

1,300 00 

800 00 



700 00 
400 00 

1,200 00 
800 00 
600 00 
250 00 
500 00 
400 00 

700 00 
600 00 
500 00 
450 00 
450 00 

800 00 
400 00 

700 00 
400 00 
500 00 
350 00 
300 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



31 Oct. '32 
7 Apr. '39 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



6 Apr. '58 
1 July '84 



10 May '43 

14 Sept. '44 

29 Apr. '37 
1 Sept. '46 
8 May '50 

21 Sept. '55 
31 Aug. '59 

30 Mar. '48 

1 Aug. '50 

8 May '54 

26 Apr. '46 

28 Aug. '41 

28 July '54 



27 Aug. '23 
11 Oct. '37 



14 Dec. '39 

7 June '62 

22 July '42 

14 Aug. '37 

7 Mar. '73 



1 Aug. '77 
1 July '85 

20 Aug. '90 
1 Aug. '83 

12 July '83 
1 Jan. '94 

10 July '99 
1 Nov. '00 

- May '79 
1 Jan. '88 
1 May '92 
1 Apr. '82 
1 Aug. '99 

19 June '94 
5 May '71 

12 Mar. '68 

1 July '98 
1 May '91 
1 May '89 
4 Mar. '97 



64 



SEC RET A RY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE— QUEBEC. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Mansonville. 

Lynch, Walter , 

Perkins, Calvin Colburn.... 

Soule, Frank Foster 

Oilman, Henry A 

Montreal. 

White, Robert Smeaton 

Boyer, Remi 

Laurin, Alphonse 

Lanthier, Arthur Aurelien. 

McLaughlin, Henry 

Malboeuf, Arthur 

Lamer, Joseph Emmanuel.., 

Charland, Magloire 

Mercier, Edouard Henri , 

Porteous, John 

Wilkes, Edward Thomas.... 

Sherritt, James 

Martin, Nap. Pierre 

Tuff, David 

McDougall, James 

Lavoie, Francois Arthur.... 

Scott, Edward Taylor 

Chambers, Thomas 

Smith, George 

Tighe, Edward 

Davis, John 

Cross, Samuel 

Sorley, James Stewart 

Isaacson, Herbert Noel 

Belair, Gaspard Adelard P 

Dansereau, Joseph A 

McKenna, Wm. John 



Present Rank. 



Collector 

Landing Waiter.... 
Preventive Officer, 
do 



Collector 

Surveyor 

Chief Clerk 

do 

Tide Surveyor 

Chief Landing Waiter 

Landing Waiter 

do 



do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Cashier 

Assistant Cashier. 

Clerk 

do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Date. 



1 May '79 
3 Oct. '74 
1 July '00 
5 Sep. '00 

1 Jan. '96 
8 June '92 
July '93 
Feb. '95 
Aug. '92 
Sept. '94 
Apr. '74 
Apr. '74 
Apr. '74 
Nov '89 
Oct. '94 
Feb. '95 
Oct. 'S4 
Mar. '96 
July '98 
Apr. '88 
Apr. '88 
Apr, '74 
June '76 
Apr. '82 
July '83 
July '83 
July '83 
July '83 
July '83 
June '99 
Nov. '89 



Present 
Salary. 



% cts. 
700 00 
500 00 
300 00 
500 00 

4,000 00 

1,600 00 

1,400 00 

1,400*00 

1,000 00 

1,100 00 

950.00 

900 00 

900 00 

800 00 

650 00 

1,000 CO 

600 00 

750 00 

650 00 

1,700 00 

1,500 00 

1,150 00 

1,000 00 

1,200 00 

1,000 00 

900 00 

950 00 

950 00 

700 00 

600 00 

1,000 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



4 May '47 

5 Dec. '33 
1 Feb. '54 

10 Jan. '67 

15 Mar. '56 

1 Oct. '42 

2 July '43 
15 Oct. '45 

7 Oct. '64 

8 Dec. '36 
— Feb. '44 

4 Sept. '36 

20 Oct. '38 
10 May '44 
19 June '44 
14 Nov. '44 

9 Deo. '61 
1 Dec. '46 

29 June =65 
26 Sept '33 
12 Feb. '30 
26 May '43 

30 June '50 
26 Nov. '47 

9 Nov. '39 
9 Dec. '47 

14 Aug. '60 

6 Nov. '55 

15 Sept. '58 

21 Sept. '73 
23 Dec. '68 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 May '79 

3 Oct. '74 
1 July '00 
5 Sept. 00 

1 Jan. '96 

7 Apr. '72 

13 May '62 

23 Oct. '73 
1 Jan. '88 
1 July '72 
1 July '72 
1 Apr. '74 
1 Apr. '74 
1 Mar. '84 
1 May '84 
1 May '91 
1 Dec. '87 

— June '72 
1 July '98 

20 Jan. '65 
1 Apr. '88 

— Apr. '72 

24 June '76 
1 Apr. '82 
1 July '83 
1 July '83 
1 July '83 
I July '83 
1 July '83 

13 June '99 

4 Nov. '89 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS—OUTSIDE SERVICE-QUEBEC. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Present Rank. 



Montreal— Continued. 

Perham, Louis Daniel 

Laurin, Alphonse, jr 

Butler, Tobias 

Heroux, Blaise 

Tansey, Timothy Peter 

Loyer, Joseph Samuel 

Bourret, Arthur 

Laurier, Albert 

Fontaine, Rodolphe 

Hough, John •••• 

Chevrier, F. L 

Giroux, A. E 

Bessette, Jos M 

Patterson, Walter 

Latouche, A. M 

Chicoine, J. A 

Cloran, Edward 

McCafiFrey, Wm. John 

Douglas, James Henry 

Ambrosse, John David Long, 

B.C.L. 
Brossard, Telesphore 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



DatP of i ^^^® 0^ 
Birth"' Firs' Ap.- 
I pointment. 



Clerk 1 July '90 

do 1 July '89 

Clerk & Land. Waiter. 1 July '84 

Clerk |16 May '96 

Clerk & Land' g Waiter i 10 April '89 

do do ...! 1 July '90 

do do ...jlO April'OO 

do do 

do do 
Clerk 

do 



I 2 Mar. '00 

IFeb. '01 

17 Aug. '99 

17 Aug. '99 



do |19 Aug. '99 



do 
do 
do 



19 Aug. '99 
1 Feb. 00 
1 Oct. '93 



Hatchette, John 

Lanthier, Auguste 

Lavoie, Jos. Adelard 

Cuthbert. Robert 

Dawson, T. J 

Langan, Frank 

Donohue, Edward 

White, John David 

Lunny, Richard J 

O'Shae, Edward 

Corbeil, Joseph Zephirin. 

30^^5 



do I 1 Oct. '00 

1 

do 1 Oct. '00 

do 10 July '99 

Dominion Appraiser.... 16 May '96 

do do |l6Dec. '88 



Appraiser 

do 

Asst. Appraiser 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Gauger & Weigher. 



6 June '91 
1 July '82 
4 April ' 74 i 
1 Dec. '90 
IJuly '93 

1 April '96 
13 July '97 
4 Sept. '97 
1 Sept. '00 
1 July '98 
1 July '01 

7 Jan. '96 



$ cts. 
900 00 
650 00 
600 00 
800 00 
600 00 
600 00 
700 00 
650 00 
500 00 
500 00 
800 00 
700 00 
750 00 
600 00 
650 00 
600 00 
650 00 
1,000 00 
1,800 00 
2,000 00 
2,000 00 
1,800 00 
1,300 00 
950 00 
1,200 00 
1,100 00 
1,100 00 
1,100 00 
700 00 
1,000 00 
600 00 
1,200 00 



3 Apr. '54 

13 Mar. '65 

5 June '56 
29 Sept. '58 
28 Jan. '56 
15 Aprir59 

4 Nor. '42 
8 Dec. '69 

14 Aug. '65 
24 June '67 

15 April' 78 

27 Aprir64 
23 Aug. '75 
'74 

8 Jan. '60 

18 April '78 

6 Feb. '59 

23 Jan. '64 
;21 May '44 

28 Jan. '38 

28 Oct. '48 

24 May '34 

20 Mar. '38 

9 Feb. '69 

21 June '44 

29 April '45 
16 April '48 

22 Dec. '45 
14 Jan. '57 

19 Mar. '60 
27 May '70 
14 Dec. '50 



1 July '85 
1 July '89 
1 July '84 
1 Aug. '86 
10 April' 89 
1 April '90 
— Nor. '73 
1 Jan. '00 
IFeb. '01 
17 Aug. '99 
jl7 Aug. '99 
19 Aug. '99 
19 Aug. '99 
1 Feb. '00 
1 Oct. '93 
1 Oct. 'Ofr 
1 Oct. '00 
1 Feb. '89- 
1 Jan. '88- 
1 April '82: 
1 July '86' 
1 July '82' 
4 April ' 74 
-July '8» 
1 July '95 
1 April' de- 
ls July '97 
4 Sept. '97 
1 Sept. 'oa 
1 Dec. '87 
IJuly '01 
1 Oct. '83 



m 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWARD VII., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE— QUEBEC. 



Niime and P. 0. Address. 



Montreal— Continued. 

Jones, Thom«bs Michael 

Lemieux, Damase Joseph 

Ooallier, Jean-Baptiste 

Bemwid, H 

Murray, John 

Momson, John 

Matbeson, John 

Nugent, Arthur 

Losey, Taylor ^ 

Garault, Maxime 

Nicholson, Thomas William, 

McOinskey, John 

Sanguinette, Leonidas 

Johnston, James 

Roach, Michael 

Lambert, Jeremiah. 

Vallee, Henri 

Richardson, Williaaa Henry. 

Rawley, William ^ 

Pare, AdhenMU* 

Martin, P , 

Holdbnook, B. T 

Balthazatd, B 

Guferhi, Louis Joseph 

Lafleua;, L. H «.... 

Hcfher, Martiu ^ 

Drysdale, John 

Galbrahh, J- ~ 

Martineau, J B ►.. 

Patterson, William Low ...... 

FhcBniflc, John 

Ooouey, P. J ., 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Assistant Gauger 

do 

Locker 

do 

Tide Waiter 

Packer 

do ~ 

do 

Tide Waiter & Locker. 

Tide Waiter 

do 

do and Locker. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Cheese Inspector 

Tide Waiter..^...„ 

do 

Clerk - 

Tide Waiter 

do .„. 

do 

Preventive Officer. ..«« 

do 

do ....«« 

do ........ 

do 

Tide Waiter 

do 

do .....,«.. 



1 April' 96 

1 July '98 

30 April' 72 

16 May '96 

21 Aug. '01 

10 Nov. '85 

1 Jan. '90 

1 Mar. '96 

IJuly '85 

— Oct. "74 

— June ' 72 

— June ' 72 
30 June '72 

— May '72 
1 Dec. '87 
1 April '74 
1 April' 74 
1 Dec. '96 
1 June '85 

14 May '89 
1 July '01 
1 July '95 
1 July '95 

16 May '96 
1 Nov. '94 
1 Feb. '95 

12 July '97 
1 July '95 

15 Nov. '97 
1 May '91 
1 May '91 

il6'May '96 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts 
750 00 
900 00 
800 00 
550 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
750 GO 
600 00 
550 00 
750 00 
560 00 
550 00 
550 00 
550 00 
600 00 
900 00 
500 00 
600 00 
600 00 
550 00 
500 00 
550 00 
700 00 
600 00 
550 00 
500 00 
500 00 
600 00 
550 00 
500 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



1 May '67 

2 Jan. '53 
26 Oct. -44 

29 Dec. '50 

8 Feb. '62 

16 May '48 
15 Mar. '49 
28 Sept. '42 

24 Sept. '44 

26 July '34 

17 Jan. '38 

25 Dec. '45 

21 Feb. '48 

9 Sept. '35 

30 July '64 
— April '37 

27 May '47 
9 Sept. '52 

31 Oct. '40 
19 June '62 
27 Jan. '51 

3 Oct. '61 
8 Mar. '61 

23 Jan. '65 
15 Oct. '42 

22 Feb. '47 
31 Oct. '63 

26 July '58 
13 Sept. '38 
26 Jan. *o3 
13 May '44 
22 July '64 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 April '96 

1 July '85 

30 April ' 72 

16 May '96 

1 July '88 

10 Nov. '85 

1 Jan. '90 

1 Mar. '96 

1 July '85 

— Oct. '74 

— June '72 

— June ' 72 
30 June ' 72 

— May '72 
1 Dec. '87 
1 April '74 
1 April '74 
1 May "84 
1 June '85 

14 May '89 
1 July '95 
1 July '95 
1 July '95 

16 May '96 
I Nov. '94 
1 Feb. '95 

12 July '97 
1 July '95 

15 Nov. '97 
1 May '91 
IMay '91 

16 May '96 



OIVIL SERVICE LIST 



67 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS-^ OUTSIDE SERVICE— QUEBEC. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Present Rank. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



Montreal — Continued. 
L'Africain, Napoleon.... 

Bri^re, J. C. 

Scleater, Michael M, 

Scanlon, Michael 

McCamley, Henry 

Bernard, Euclide 

O'Neill, P.J 

Boyd, William Stewart.. 

Slattery, Timothy F 

Montenari, A. N. P 

McCallum, J. S 

Prevost, Napoleon , 

Harrigan, P. Joseph 

Prevost, Louis 

Corbeil, James H 

Turton, Thos. H 

Perry, Edward 

Robert, James Alexis 

Bouthellier, Armand 

O'Shaughnessy, Jas 

Barlow, A. L 

Riopelle, J. A 

Dequoy, Jas. Edward 

Flynn, Thomas 

Coughlin, Jas. P 

Lytle, Samuel B 

Hutchins, Roland F 

St. Jean, Samuel 

Cauchon, Flavien L 

Gouin, Ernest 

Harvey, Percy J. A 

Webster, Robt. B 

30—5^ 



Tide Waiter , 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Landing Waiter .. 

Tide Waiter 

do 

Clerk 

Tide Waiter 

do , 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Clerk 

Tide Waiter 

do 

do 

Preventive Officer 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 




68 



SECRETARY OF STATE 

1-2 EDWARD Vll., A. 1902 
DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE— QUEBEC. 



Name and P.O. Address. 



Montreal — Concluded 

Paradis, Pierre 

Pelletier, Hubert E 

Dumontier, Victor 

Allen, George Miles 

Homier, Jos Albert 



Present Rank. 



Smith, Merritt Munson 

Dundee 

Basinet, Louis 

Joliette 

Long, George 

St. Regis 

O'Reilly, Charles B 

Trout River 

St. Michel, F. X 

St. Jer6me 

Paspebiac. 

Beauchesne, Pierre Clovis.. 



Leblanc, Joseph. 

Ne^ 



few Richmond 
Perce. 

Flynn, William 

Sirois, Joseph Octave 

Quebec. 

Forsyth, Joseph Bell 

Carter, William Henry 

Dion, Aurelien V 

Hecker, Eberhard 

Watters, James Giblin 

Gouin, Charles 

Edge, W. E 

Doucet, Eugene 

Lam^re, Chas 

Larue, Panet Edouard 

Gray, Frost Wood 

Frechette, J. E . 

Belanger, Francois Xavier... 



Preventive Officer 

do 

do 

Tide Waiter 

do 

Sub-Collector 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Collector 

Preventive Officer 

Collector 

Landing Waiter and 
Searcher. 

Collector. 

Surveyor 

Appraiser 

do 

Assistant Appraiser 

Clerk 

do 

do 

do 

Tide Surveyor 

Assist. Tide Surveyor.. 

Clerk 

Ganger 



Date 



1 June '01 
1 July '01 
1 July '01 
1 Apr. '96 
19 June '97 

15 Sept. '79 
14 Nov. '96 
18 Apr. '87 

1 Feb. '88 
13 Apr. '97 

1 June '83 

16 May '88 



1 Apr. '79 
25 June '79 



17 Apr. '91 

1 Sept. '91 
4 June '89 

19 Jan. '01 

2 June '88 
28 Apr. '60 

1 Apr. '98 
1 Mar. '74 
1 Apr. '96 
1 Oct. '93 
1 Oct. '93 
1 July '00 
1 Oct. '95 



Present 
Salary. 



$ cts. 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
550 00 
500 00 
400 00 
300 00 
300 00 



1,000 00 
100 00 



600 00 

450 00 

3,000 00 

1,700 00 

1,400 00 

1,300 00 

800 00 

1,200 00 

900 00 

950 00 

550 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

700 00 

1,000 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



29 June '55 

16 May '63 
29 Sept. '68 

28 Feb. '63 
12 June '77 

8 Dec. '34 

29 Nov. 46 

24 Mar. '39 
19 Nov. '49 
10 Apr. '51 

8 June '41 

25 May '40 

22 July '36 

29 Jan. '35 

30 June '31 

17 May '36 

18 May '39 
2 June '56 

16 Dec. '48 

2 Aug. '30 
24 June '34 
21 Aug. '49 
12 Sept. '72 

3 Jan. '43 

4 Apr. '42 
16 Apr. '56 
— Dec. '50 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 July '01 

1 July '01 

1 July '01 

1 Apr. '96 

19 June '97 

14 Mar. '64 

14 Nov. '96 

18 Apr. '87 

1 Eeb. '88 

13 Apr. '97 

5 May '71 

16 May '88 

18 June '58 
25 June ' 79- 



17 Apj. '91 
9 May '71 

27 Oct. '77 
20 Oct. '97 

2 June '88 

28 Apr. '60 
1 Sept. '75 
1 Mar. '74 
1 Apr. '9& 
1 Sept. '73 
9 Apr. '84 
1 July '00 
5 Aug. '8L 



i 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTMENT OP CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE— QUEBEC. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



Quebec — C on eluded . 

Bolger, Michael Kingsley.... 

Laurin, Louis Napoleon 

Dugal, L^andre 

Lemieux, E. 

St. Francois, Beauce. 

Pelletier, N.G 

Riviere du Loup. 

Joncas, Pierre Leger 

Magdalen Islands. 

Bilodeau, Ambroise. 

Trinity Bay. 

Gagne, Auguste 

Chambord Junct. 
OrifiS'hs, Jacob 

Rouillard, Jean 

Porier, Jos. N 

Victoriaville. 
Batterton, James 

Trudel, J. Edmond - 

Vallerand, Louis Napol6on . 

Griffiths, Geo. Anthony 

Fortin, 

Hannon, Henry M 

Jobin, Henri 

Lafond, Joseph 

Rimouski. 
Gauvreau, Joseph 

St. Armand. 

Bourret, Edmond Augustus. 

Futvoye,Fred. Franc. Booth. 

Luke, Philip Edward 

Philipsburg 

St. Hyacinthe. 

Henshaw, Geo. H 

Lamothe, Arthur 

Pare, Jules 

Drummondville. 



Landing Waiter 1 Jan. 

do 16 May 

Warehouse Keeper 31 Oct. 

Sub-Collector 8 Jan. 

do 1 June 

do 1 July 

Preventive Officer 1 Dec. 

do 19 June 

House-keeper 1 July 

Locker — Dec. 

Sub-Collector 1 Apr. 

Locker 123 Oct. 

Tide Waiter 22 Sept. 

Preventive Officer :14 Oct. 



Tide Waiter 

do 

Packer and Messenger. 

Preventive Officer 

do 



Collector. 



Collector 

Preventive Officer., 
Sub-Collector 



Collector 

Preventive Officer.. 
Sub-Collector 



20 Aug. 

1 Nov. 
20 Aug. 

1 July 
17 Aug. 



1 July '98 

1 June '77 

1 July '89 

INov. '77 



1 Aug. '99 
1 Aug. '99 
1 Apr. '01 



$ cts. 
800 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
600 00 
500 00 
500 00 
100 00 
300 00 
550 00 
650 00 
400 00 
600 00 
650 00 
700 00 
600 00 
550 00 
500 00 
550 00 
500 00 

400 00 

800 00 
500 00 
250 00 

950 00 
700 00 
300 00 



12 July '48 
8 July '52 
4 Sept. '36 
1 Jan. '50 
6 Mar. '57 

10 May '51 
'32 

6 Apr. '50 

24 Feb. '32 
31 July '40 
15 June '61 

15 June '34 

3 Mar. '42 
28 Feb. '56 

7 Sept. '60 
26 Feb. '38 
10 Oct. '66 
20 Nov. '30 

16 Mar. '43 

19 Mar. '62 

16 Nov. '40 

25 Feb. '64 
23 July '28 

13 April '49 

4 Mar. '56 
22 Feb. '74 



1 Jan. '8Q 

12 June '82 
31 Oct. '70 

8 Jan. '97 
1 June '96 

— Sept. '75 
1 Dec. '81 

19 June' 97 
1 May #'54 

— Dec. '72 
1 Apr. '01 

23 Oct. '73 

22 Sept. '74 

1 Jan. '86 

20 Aug. '90 
1 Nov. '95 

20 Aug. '90 

IJuly '98 

17 Aug. '99 

1 July '98 

13 Feb. '65 
1 July '89 
INov. 77 

1 Aug. '99 
1 Aug. '99 
1 Apr. '01 



70 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



1-2 EDWAUD VII., A. 1902 

DEPARTMENT OF CUSTOMS— OUTSIDE SERVICE—NEW BRUNSWICK. 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Present Rank. 



St. Johns. 
Wood, Hannibal Whitney... 

Latour, Joseph Cyprien 

Jameson, William Matthew.. 

Gallet, Alphonse 

Rouse's Point. 

Pinsonneault, Joseph E 

LacoUe. 

Baker, Joel Homer 

Frelighsburg 

Brodeur, S. A 

Valleyfield. 

Quinn, J. D 

Granby. 

Sherbrooke. 

Stenson, Michael Thomas.... 

Hunt, William Josiah 

Des6ve, Orig6ne Louis 

O'Dell, Henry A 

Murphy, James 

Richmond. 

Pender, James 

Windsor Mills. 

Sorel. 

Mathieu, Joseph 

Stanstead 

McClintock, Chas. Hugh 

Paquette, John Flavien 

Campbell, Edward M 

McGowan, William, jun 

Georgeville. 

Three Rivers. 

Vanasse, Pierre Benj 

D ufresne, Isaie - 

Prov. of New Brunswick. 

Bathurst. 

Veniot, Peter John 

Leahy, David 

Benoit, Joseph 

Tracadie. 



Collector..... 

Preventive Officer 

Landing Waiter 

Tide Waiter k Locker. 
Sab-Collector , 

do 

do 

do 



Collector , 

Landing Waiter 

Clerk and Ldg. Waiter 

Appraiser 

Sub-Collector , 

do 



Collector. 



Collector 

Landing Waiter.. . 
Preventive Officer. 
^Landing Waiter... 



Collector 

Preventive Officer., 



Collector 

Clerk and Ldg. Waiter 
Preventive Officer.... 



Date. 



Present 
Salary. 



1 Feb. '90 

1- July '89 

1 Jan. '99 

IMay '72 

17 Jan. '88 

13 Jan. '86 

1 July '98 

1 Nov. '98 

24 Oct. '00 

19 June '81 

1 Nov. '98 

1 Apr. '93 

12 Apr. '90 

1 Jan. '00 

i 

9 Apr. '84 I 

1 July '98 I 

i 

1 Nov. '87 i 

1 July '00 I 

6 Dec. '80 '' 

1 Mar. '89 

1 July '00 



7 May '00 
1 Aug. '83 i 

16 June '83 j 

I 



$ cts. 
1,200 00 
600 00 
500 00 
600 00 
600 00 
650 00 
500 00 
200 00 

1,500 00 
700 00 
800 00 
900 00 
700 00 
400 00 

600 00 



Date of 
Birth. 



Date of 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



10 July '40 IFeb. '90 
20 Jan. '62 | 1 July '89 

4 Dec. '45 j 1 Jan. '99 
20 Sept. '36 |— May '62 
19 Nov. '50 17 Jan. '88 
19 Jan. '62 j 1 Nov. '83 
22 Feb. '52 I 1 July '98 

6 Jan. '48 i 1 Nov. '98 



8 Dec. '38 24 Oct. '00 

18 Sept. '43 19 June -81 

31 Aug. '69 29 Apr. '90 

15 Feb. '55 ! 1 Apr. '93 

20 July '48 jl2 Apr. '90 

... '54 I 1 Jan. '00 

r 
i 

20 Feb. '37 9 Apr. '84 



1,100 00 4 Jan. '44 
500 00 9 June '62 
500 00 i26 Sept. '65 
580 00 24 Feb. '49 



1,100 00 
500 00 



1,000 00 
500 00 



3 Oct. '38 
I Dec. '52 



6 Oct. '63 
13 May '54 



00 15 June '37 



1 July '98 
1 Aug. '82 
1 July '00 
6 Dec. '80 



1 Mar. '89 
1 July '00 



7 May '00 

1 Aug. '83 

16 June '83 



CIVIL SERVICE LIST 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 30 

DEPARTME^^: OF GUSTOIUS— OUTSIDE SERVICE— NEW BRUNSWICK. 



71 



Name and P. 0. Address. 



Present Rank. 



Date. 



Batuurst— Concluded. 

Sormany, Henry Armand.... 
Shippegan. 

Bourgeois, Mederic E 

Tracadie. 

Poulin, Prosper E 

Caraquet. 

Chatham, N.B. 

Ferguson, Daniel 

Benson, Peter H. C 

Connors, Patrick 

Johnson, Basil Eloi 

Richibucto. 
LeBlanc, Jude J 

Buctouche. 

Rus3, Wm. Horen Botsford.. 

Kingston. 

Keswick, David 

Buctouche. 

Richard, Damien 

The Cape. 

Dalhousie. 

Montgomery, William 

Harquail, Jas. Sherman 

McKenzie, Archibald 

Campbellton. 

Fredericton. 

Street, Alfred Foxcraft 

Winter, Herbert Gayner 

Moncton. 

Binney, Irvine Whitty 

Rayworth, John Snowball... 

Woodworth, William 

Hillsboro. 

Dysart, Andrew Huot 

Cocagne. 

Leger, Anselme M 

Shediac. 

Wood, William Rufus 

Shediac. 

Cleaveland, David 

Alma. 

Chapman, A. W 

Dorchester. 

McKinley, Charles Hamilton 

Alma. 

Turner, James B 

Harvey. 

Pye, John L 

Hopewell Cape. 



Sub-Collector 

do 

do 

Collector 

Preventive Officer... 
Preventive Officer.., 

Sub-Collector , 

do 

Tide Waiter 

do 

Preventive Officer.. 

Collector , 

Preventive Officer.. 
Sub-Collector 

Collector 

Appraiser 

Collector ...,. 

Landing Waiter 

Sub-Collector 

do , 

do , 

Preventive Officer.., 

Sub-Collector 

do , 

Preventive Officer.. 

Sub-Collector 

Preventive Officer.. 



Present 
Salary. 



Date of 

Birth. 



1 Aug. '77 

17 Apr. '75 

1 Apr. '01 

27 Mar. '65 

14 July '99 

U July '99 I 

1 Jan. '90 

1 July '91 

16 July '77 

1 June '78 j 

1 Oct. '86 ; 

1 July '71 

1 July '00 

12 July '83 

1 Jan. '73 
1 Jan. '71 

1 Nov. '83 
1 July '85 
1 July '98 
27 June '73 
1 July '98 
1 Jan. '88 
1 May '85 
1 Nov. '95 
1 Sept. '75 
1 July '01 
1 July '01 



% cts. 
600 00 
200 00 
400 00 



23 Oct. '35 
15 Apr. '38 
... Oct. '44 



1,200 00 30 Apr. '26 
800 00 U Oct. '55 



450 00 
800 00 
500 00 
400 00 
300 00 
60 00 

1,000 00 
300 00 
500 00 

1,500 00 
1,000 00 

1,200 00 
700 00 
600 00 
500 00 
600 00 
400 00 
300 00 
400 00 
200 00 
300 00 
150 00 



22 Sept. '40 
4 May '59 

28 Apr. '48 

23 Jan. '38 
30 Jan. '35 
15 May '30 

6 Oct. '38 
8 Sept. '62 

29 May '41 



Date oi 
First Ap- 
pointment. 



1 Aug. '77 

17 Apr. '75 

1 Apr. '01 

27 Mar. '65 

14 July '99 

14 July '99 

1 Jan. '90 

1 July '91 

16 July '77 

1 June '78 

1 Oct. '86 

1 July '71 

1 June '78 

12 July '83 



28 Jan. -'44 1 Jan. '73 
9 Nov. '50 ' 1 Jan. '71 



16 Dec. '74 
1 July '75 
1 July '98 

27 June '73 
1 July '98 
1 Jan. '88 
1 May '85 
1 Nov. '95 
1 Sept. '75 
1 July '01 
1 July '00 



10 July 


'41 


1 Nov. 


'57 


7 Jan. 


'32 


30 Aug. 


'38 


9 May 


'47 


12 Oct 


'52 


14 Sept. 


'39 


13 Mar. 


'61 


20 Mar. 


'40 


22 Nov. 


'44 


4 Feb. 


'34